NOAA Central Library
 Contact Us | Catalog | Ask-A-Librarian | Feedback | A-Z Index
All of NOAA

NOAA Central Library Brown Bag Seminar Series

rss feed icon Sign up for our RSS Feed to be automatically notified of library events each week. What is RSS?

General Information

All Brown Bag Seminars (unless otherwise noted) are held from 12:00pm - 1 p.m. in the NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring.

For remote access via webinar (unless specified otherwise below), please fill out the registration form a few minutes before the meeting is scheduled to begin. The Meeting Number is 742656968; the Passcode is brownbag. For audio in the US and Canada, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360.

Contact Mary Lou Cumberpatch (301-713-2600 ext. 140) or Albert (Skip) Theberge (301-713-2600 ext. 118) for further information or to set up a Brown Bag.

Archived Seminars

A list of previous Brown Bag Seminars and their accompanying Powerpoint presentations, when available, can be found on the Archive Brown Bags page.

 

blue line

Upcoming Seminars

Marine National Monuments and NOAA: Come find out what makes a Monument different than a Sanctuary, and learn about NOAA's Marine National Monument Program

Date: May 26, 2015 at 12:00pm EST

Speaker: Samantha Brooke, Marine National Monuments Program Manager

Abstract: There are a total of four marine national monuments in the United States, all located in the Pacific Ocean: Papahanaumokuakea (designated in 2006), Marianas Trench (designated in 2009), Rose Atoll (designated in 2009), and the Pacific Remote Islands (designated in 2009 and expanded in 2014). NOAA co-manages each of these extraordinary places, which are home to near-pristine coral reefs, large apex predator populations, rare and endangered species, and unique geological features. The Monuments also are intimately connected with the cultures and communities of Pacific peoples. As a co-manager, NOAA is charged with implementing the Presidential Proclamations through the development of management plans and research programs to preserve and protect them. An overview of the Monuments Program will be provided, along with a short introduction to each Monument and an summary of exciting developments.

About the Speaker: Samantha G. Brooke is the Program Manager for NOAA Fisheries Pacific Islands Regional Office in Honolulu, Hawaii. She has spent nearly decade working for NOAA Fisheries programs, including the Northwest Regional Office, Protected Resources Division in Seattle, Washington and the Office of Science and Technologies National Observer Program in Silver Spring, Maryland.


The Tale of Two Bays: A comparison of the American horseshoe crab population in Wellfleet Bay, MA and Great Bay Estuary, NH and the lessons to be learned

Date: Thursday, May 28, 2015, 12:00 - 12:30 pm EST

Speaker: Helen Cheng, NOAA OAR National Sea Grant Office, helen.cheng@noaa.gov

Abstract: Due to over-harvesting as bait, American horseshoe crab (Limulus polyphemus) populations along the U.S. Atlantic Coast have been declining, particularly in New England. Additionally, population trends have not reserved despite state-by-state quotas and regulations. Current management and monitoring include closing the horseshoe crab harvest during the weeks of new and full moons of their spawning season and conducting shoreline surveys; these methods were originally based on horseshoe crab survey data from Delaware Bay populations indicating that peak spawning activity occurred during these times. Historically, Wellfleet Bay, Massachusetts has been a location where harvesting horseshoe crabs for bait is practiced, and despite current strict regulations and yearly monitoring, populations at this location continue to decline. While some states conduct monitoring and surveys annually, New Hampshire's Great Bay Estuary, supporting a modest population of horseshoe crabs, do not have an organized monitoring program, thus it is unclear when and where spawning occurs in this location. Recent studies investigating horseshoe crab spawning behavior, and new research and survey data from Wellfleet Bay, MA and Great Bay Estuary, NH indicate that peak spawning activity did not always occur during times of the new and full moons; instead, it is suggested that environmental factors may strongly influence horseshoe crab spawning activity. Generalization of scientific information could lead to ineffective decision-making in the management of a species, especially a species that is vulnerable during spawning and mating. Rather, behavior of local populations need to be investigated that then may contribute to the overall conservation of horseshoe crabs.

Note: This seminar is part of the 2015 Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar series .

Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


The bloom that wasn't: Perfect demonstration of how nature does not follow a graduate student's timeline

Date: Thursday, May 28, 2015 at 12:30pm - 1:00 EST

Speaker: Emily Smith, NOAA Climate Observation Division, Climate Program Office, Emily.a.smith@noaa.gov

Abstract: Estuaries are biologically productive and important habitats for several fisheries. However, human intervention has separated many estuaries from their needed freshwater source and the common solution is to use diversions to regulate the flow. This episodic increase in nutrients into estuaries has sometimes led to the formation of freshwater cyanobacteria HABs (CyanoHABs). The goal of this research was to look at a field research study of phytoplankton bloom dynamics; management implications for cyanobacteria entering estuaries; and an outreach effort in relation to residents' knowledge about cyanobacteria and algae. The first study compared the phytoplankton bloom dynamics, specifically CyanoHABs, in Lake Pontchartrain, Louisiana (LA) during a diversion opening year and a non-opening year. While variations in freshwater flow were found to be important to determine which phytoplankton group dominates the system, species diversity within a group was likely regulated by the water source. During the large flow year (21.9 km3) in 2011, chlorophytes and diatoms were the dominant groups in the spring. In 2012, with a much lower flow of 0.3 km3, chlorophytes and diatoms were again dominant in the spring, but both years' cyanobacteria numbers significantly increased in the late summer. The second study surveyed fishermen about their knowledge of algae and HABs. This baseline data was used to create an educational brochure which was distributed to the marinas around Lake Pontchartrain and Lac Des Allemandes. There was also a follow-up survey to determine the effectiveness of the educational brochure. Many of the people surveyed had a basic understanding of algae, but 60% were not familiar with the term "harmful algal blooms."

Note: This seminar is part of the 2015 Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar series .

Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


Brown Bag Seminar

Date: Tuesday, June 16, 2015 at 12:00pm EST

Speaker: TBD

Abstract: TBD

Note: This seminar is part of the 2015 Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar series .

Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


Elsevier Presents Publisher Connect

Date: Thursday, June 25, 2015 at 12:00pm EST

Speaker: TBD

Abstract: TBD

Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


Brown Bag Seminar

Date: Thursday, July 9, 2015 at 12:00pm EST

Speaker: TBD

Abstract: TBD

Note: This seminar is part of the 2015 Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar series .

Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


July 15 is Reserved for Knauss Fellows


Brown Bag Seminar

Date: Thursday, July 16, 2015 at 12:00pm EST

Speaker: TBD

Abstract: TBD

Note: This seminar is part of the 2015 Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar series .

Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


Plain Language, Writing for clarity and Impact with your readers in mind

Date: Wednesday, July 22, 2015 at 12:00pm EST

Speaker: Frances Pflieger, NOAA Fisheries

Abstract: TBD

Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


Brown Bag Seminar

Date: Thursday, August 20, 2015 at 12:00pm EST

Speaker: TBD

Abstract: TBD

Note: This seminar is part of the 2015 Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar series .

Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


August 25 is Reserved for BIG event


Brown Bag Seminar

Date: Thursday, September 17, 2015 at 12:00pm EST

Speaker: TBD

Abstract: TBD

Note: This seminar is part of the 2015 Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar series .

Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


Brown Bag Seminar

Date: Thursday, October 15, 2015 at 12:00pm EST

Speaker: TBD

Abstract: TBD

Note: This seminar is part of the 2015 Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar series .

Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


 

Additional seminars are scheduled through the OneNOAA Science Discussion Seminar Series

 

  Last modified:    Thu, 21-May-2015 19:25 UTC Library.Reference@noaa.gov
 
Dept. of Commerce - NOAA - NESDIS - NCEI
* External link: You will be leaving the Federal
   Government by following an external link.
USA.gov - The U.S. Government's Web Portal