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NOAA Central Library Brown Bag Seminar Series

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General Information

All Brown Bag Seminars (unless otherwise noted) are held from 12:00pm - 1 p.m. in the NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring.

For remote access via webinar (unless specified otherwise below), please fill out the registration form a few minutes before the meeting is scheduled to begin. The Meeting Number is 742656968; the Passcode is brownbag. For audio in the US and Canada, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360.

Contact Mary Lou Cumberpatch (301-713-2600 ext. 140) or Albert (Skip) Theberge (301-713-2600 ext. 118) for further information or to set up a Brown Bag.

Archived Seminars

A list of previous Brown Bag Seminars and their accompanying Powerpoint presentations, when available, can be found on the Archive Brown Bags page.

 

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Upcoming Seminars

Energy Innovation and the Marine Environment: Finfish and Tidal Power in Cobscook Bay, Maine

Date: Thursday, March 26, 2015 at 12:00 -12:30 pm Eastern

Speaker: Jeffrey D. Vieser, NOAA Fisheries, Office of Science and Technology

Abstract: Cobscook Bay, Maine is a macrotidal embayment on the U.S. - Canadian border where, in 2012, the Western Hemisphere's first grid-connected in-stream tidal power turbine was deployed. A suite of environmental monitoring activities accompanied this deployment to assess its potential impacts and enable informed decision-making by relevant stakeholders regarding this new technology. One focus of these monitoring activities was to investigate how a tidal turbine would affect finfish. A combination of hydroacoustics and direct netting activities was used to describe Cobscook Bay's finfish assemblage composition, document the distribution of finfish throughout the water column (i.e., their likelihood of encountering the tidal turbine), and record the interactions between finfish and a test turbine. A total of 46 species and over 60,000 individual fish were captured while netting. Finfish were found to be concentrated near the sea floor, below the height of the turbine, with some seasonal differences. The study of fish behavior near a test turbine at the surface documented various interactions, especially during night at slack tide and within the wake of the turbine.

Note: The Knauss Lecture Series features current 2015 Sea Grant Knauss Fellows

Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


The Effectiveness of Marine Protected Areas on Conserving the Fish Population in the Gulf of Aqaba, Egypt

Date: Thursday, March 26, 2015 at 12:30 - 1:00 pm Eastern

Speaker: Ayman Mabrouk, NOAA National Ocean Service, Biogeography Branch

Abstract: Marine Protected Areas have been used globally as an effective tool to maintain coral reef fisheries and conserve fish populations. This study investigated the role of the Marine Protected Areas in changing fish diversity, density, and size of 9 families over 10 years (2002-2012) of conservation efforts in the Gulf of Aqaba. Four regionns were studied, with different level of protection and fishing pressure. We found that the un-fished regions (Ras Mohamed and Sharm El Sheikh) were more abundant in total species and significantly by 2012, while Dahab significantly increased in both total species and diversity. Nabq and carnivore species were significantly decreased over time with Nabq and Dahab having the smallest fish sizes by the end of our study. Fishing pressure has been increasing in Nabq and affecting the fish population dramatically, due to pressure from Dahab fishers and non-compliance by fishing in the No Take Zones. Even in the Ras Mohamed National Park, fishing occurred causing a decline in abundance of target species. Ensuring long-term effective law enforcement is critical for the MPAs to maintain and conserve the fish populations in the Gulf of Aqaba. Tourism development and public awareness can also play a role in reducing fishing pressure, increasing fish abundance, and maintaining fish diversity.

Note: The Knauss Lecture Series features current 2015 Sea Grant Knauss Fellows

Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


Brown Bag Seminar

Date: Wednesday, April 22, 2015 at 12:00pm EST

Speaker: TBD

Abstract: TBD

Note: This seminar is part of the 2015 Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar series .

Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


Out of sight but not out of mind: Harmful effects of derelict traps in selected U.S. coastal waters

Date: Wednesday, April 29, 2015 at 12:00pm EST

Speaker: Courtney Arthur, NOAA's Marine Debris Division, Peter Murphy, NOAA's Marine Debris Division, Holly Bamford, Assistant Administrator, National Ocean Service, Ariana Sutton-Grier, University of Maryland, Cooperative Institute for Climate and Satellites

Abstract: There is a paucity of data in the published literature on the ecological and economic impacts of derelict fishing traps (DFTs) in coastal ecosystems. We synthesized results from seven NOAA-funded trap fisheries studies around the United States and determined that DFT-caused losses to habitat and harvestable annual catch are pervasive, persistent, and largely preventable. Based on this synthesis, we identified key gaps to fill in order to better manage and prevent DFTs. We conclude with suggestions for developing a U.S. DFT management strategy including: (1) targeting studies to estimate mortality of fishery stocks, (2) assessing the economic impacts of DFTs on fisheries, (3) collaborating with the fishing industry to develop solutions to ghost fishing, and (4) examining the regional context and challenges resulting in DFTs to find effective policy solutions to manage, reduce, and prevent gear loss.D

Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


Climate Change Projections from High-Resolution Global Models and the Implications for Fisheries Management in the U.S. Northeast Shelf Marine Ecosystem

Date: Wednesday, May 5, 2015 at 12:00pm EST

Speaker: Vincent S. Saba, Ph.D., Research Fishery Biologist, NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service, Northeast Fisheries Science Center, Ecosystem Assessment Program, Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory,Princeton University

Abstract: Over the past 20 years, ocean surface temperature in the United States Northeast Shelf (U.S. NES) has warmed at a substantially higher rate than the global average. To date, all climate change projections for species within the U.S. NES have been based on climate models that have a coarse ocean resolution (1 x1 degree global). These coarse models do not resolve the fine-scale bathymetry (i.e. Georges Bank, Northeast Channel) of the U.S. NES, nor do they resolve the correct position of the Northwestern wall of the Gulf Stream. Here we used high-resolution global climate models from the NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory to assess differences in climate change projections for the U.S. NES as a function model resolution. We found that the high-resolution climate model (0.1 x 0.1 degree global ocean) resolves water mass circulation much more accurately than the standard coarse models. Climate change projections of sea surface temperature and bottom temperature within the U.S. NES based on the high-resolution model are up to 1.5 C (surface) to 3 C (bottom) warmer than the projections based on the coarse models. Therefore, existing projections for the U.S. NES are conservative and thus impacts to fisheries may be greater than the current climate change projections.

Speaker's BioDr. Vincent Saba is a Research Fishery Biologist with the Northeast Fisheries Science Center's Ecosystem Assessment Program. He resides at the NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) in Princeton, New Jersey. Dr. Saba received a B.S. and M.S in Environmental Science from Drexel University. He earned a Ph.D. in Marine Science from the College of William and Mary - Virginia Institute of Marine Science. His research focuses on climate impacts on marine ecosystems. His research scales the marine food web ranging from phytoplankton to top predators. Much of his current research involves the use of NOAA GFDL's high-resolution global climate models for their use in regional marine ecosystems such as the U.S. Northeast Continental Shelf.

Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


Seminar with Stephen M. Volz, Assistant Administrator for Satellite and Information Services

Date: Thursday, May 7, 2015 at 12:00pm EST

Speaker: Stephen M. Volz, NOAA Assistant Administrator for Satellite and Information Services

Abstract: TBD

Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


Effectively Visualize Your Data and Results

Date: Wednesday, May 20, 2015 at 12:00pm EST

Speaker: James Hartman, Technical Director, Quantitative Methods Division, DOD

Abstract: An active follow-up Question and Answer will follow the seminar (remote access not provided for the follow-up session).

Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.

Note:

This seminar is sponsored by the NOAA Evaluation Training and Capacity Building Work Group.


The 2013-2014 Survey of the Washington Monument

Date: Thursday, May 21, 2015 at 12:00pm EST

Speaker: Dru Smith, PhD, Chief Geodesist, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey

Abstract: After the 5.8 - magnitude earthquake of Virginia on August 23, 2011, scaffolding was built around the Washington Monument (WM) to facilitate repairs made to the building in 2013 and 2014. This provided a rare opportunity for NOAA's National Geodetic Survey (NGS) to perform a geodetic survey incorporating direct occupation of the WM peak with multiple instruments. The goal of this survey was to provide a baseline position of the peak so accurate that future surveys would be able to detect sinking, shrinking or tilting of the monument.

This was only the third time in history (1934 and 1999 being the others) that NGS was able to use geodetic instruments at the peak. However it was the first time that a complete three-dimensional position, accurate to a millimeter, was achieved.

As an interesting by-product of the survey, an architectural height of the monument, using modern international standards, was determined. This new height is in disagreement with the historic height by almost 10 inches, almost all of which is due to the location at the base of the monument from which the height was measured. However, by adopting the standards used in 1884, NGS was able to validate the historic height to within 3/4 of an inch. This talk will outline the history of surveys at the WM as well as the highlights of the most recent survey.

About the Speaker: Dr. Dru Smith has been the Chief Geodesist of NOAA's National Geodetic Survey since 2005. He first entered NGS in 1995 after receiving his Ph.D. in geodetic science from The Ohio State University. His original job with NGS was in geoid modeling. He has also been active in developing U.S. GPS policy and modeling the ionosphere using the CORS network.

In 2008 he led the development of the GRAV-D plan, and in 2012 led the development of the NGS Ten Year Plan (2013-2023). In 2011 he was the principal investigator for the Geoid Slope Validation Survey of 2011, which proved that airborne data from GRAV-D yielded a 1 cm accurate geoid model. For his leadership of that study he was awarded the Department of Commerce's Gold Medal, their highest award.

He is a member of the Institute of Navigation, the American Geophysical Union, the International Association of Geodesy and is a Fellow of the American Congress on Surveying and Mapping (now the National Society of Professional Surveyors). He holds special appointments as a member of the Graduate Faculty of both Texas A&M University and the University of Rhode Island. He serves on the Board of Directors of the Conrad Blucher Institute for Surveying and Science and on the Advisory Board of the Department of Civil, Environmental and Geodetic Engineering at The Ohio State University and has previously served on the Board of Directors for the American Association for Geodetic Surveying.

Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


Brown Bag Seminar

Date: May 26, 2015 at 12:00pm EST

Speaker: Samantha Brooke, Marine National Monuments Program Manager

Abstract: TBD


Brown Bag Seminar

Date: Thursday, May 28, 2015 at 12:00pm EST

Speaker: TBD

Abstract: TBD

Note: This seminar is part of the 2015 Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar series .

Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


Brown Bag Seminar

Date: Thursday, June 16, 2015 at 12:00pm EST

Speaker: TBD

Abstract: TBD

Note: This seminar is part of the 2015 Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar series .

Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


Brown Bag Seminar

Date: Thursday, July 9, 2015 at 12:00pm EST

Speaker: TBD

Abstract: TBD

Note: This seminar is part of the 2015 Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar series .

Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


Brown Bag Seminar

Date: Thursday, July 16, 2015 at 12:00pm EST

Speaker: TBD

Abstract: TBD

Note: This seminar is part of the 2015 Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar series .

Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


Brown Bag Seminar

Date: Thursday, August 20, 2015 at 12:00pm EST

Speaker: TBD

Abstract: TBD

Note: This seminar is part of the 2015 Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar series .

Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


Brown Bag Seminar

Date: Thursday, September 17, 2015 at 12:00pm EST

Speaker: TBD

Abstract: TBD

Note: This seminar is part of the 2015 Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar series .

Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


Brown Bag Seminar

Date: Thursday, October 15, 2015 at 12:00pm EST

Speaker: TBD

Abstract: TBD

Note: This seminar is part of the 2015 Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar series .

Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


 

Additional seminars are scheduled through the OneNOAA Science Discussion Seminar Series

 

  Last modified:    Thu, 26-Mar-2015 17:29 UTC Library.Reference@noaa.gov
 
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