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NOAA Central Library Brown Bag Seminar Series

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General Information

All Brown Bag Seminars (unless otherwise noted) are held from 12:00pm - 1 p.m. in the NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring.

For remote access via webinar (unless specified otherwise below), please fill out the registration form a few minutes before the meeting is scheduled to begin. The Meeting Number is 742656968; the Passcode is brownbag. For audio in the US and Canada, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360.

Contact Mary Lou Cumberpatch (301-713-2600 ext. 140) or Albert (Skip) Theberge (301-713-2600 ext. 118) for further information or to set up a Brown Bag.

Archived Seminars

A list of previous Brown Bag Seminars and their accompanying Powerpoint presentations, when available, can be found on the Archive Brown Bags page.

 

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Upcoming Seminars

The USGS Hurricane Sandy Integrated Science Plan

Date: Tuesday, August 26, 2014 at 12:00pm EDT

Speaker: John Haines and Matthew Andersen, USGS

Presentation slides (pdf)

Abstract: The USGS, in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy, developed an integrated science plan across our diverse research programs. This presentation will provide an overview of the ongoing implementation of that plan with the objective to identify specific areas for further development and enhanced collaboration with NOAA programs in the short and long term. Following the thematic structure of our Sandy Science Plan ( http://pubs.usgs.gov/circ/1390/) the presentation will provide an introduction to the following activities:

Coastal Topography and Bathymetry - Overview of region-wide collection of Lidar data throughout the Sandy impact zone, improved products for delivery of topo-bathy elevation, and USGS research Lidar capabilities.

Impacts to Coastal Beaches and Barriers -The USGS has supported a sustained effort to provide tools to assess coastal vulnerability to storms, erosion, and sea-level rise. Storm vulnerability forecasts rely on NOAA data and forecasts and are provided for both "scenario" storms for long-term planning and in response to impending storms.

Environmental Quality and Persisting Contaminant Exposures, and Impacts to Coastal Ecosystems, Habitats, and Fish and Wildlife -USGS scientists have been investigating the impacts that storm-released pollutants may have had on animals, specifically mussels and sea turtles. Mussels have been collected at NOAA Mussel Watch sites. USGS scientists have also been studying the impacts of the storm at wetlands all along the mid-Atlantic and Northeast coasts using a dispersed network of surface elevation tables (SETs). About 10 of these SET locations are within the NOAA National Estuarine Research Reserve System between Virginia and Maine.

Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


Ecological Impacts of Climate-Related Ichthyofaunal Shifts and Invasive Lionfish on the Northern Gulf of Mexico Reef Fish Community

Date: Wednesday, August 27, 2014 at 12:30-1:00pm EDT

Speaker: Tony Marshak, Office of Science and Technology, NOAA Fisheries

Abstract: Large and apparently unprecedented increases in the abundance of juvenile gray (Lutjanus griseus) and lane snapper (L. synagris) within northern Gulf of Mexico (nGOM) seagrasses have been recently documented. Although previously occurring infrequently within the nGOM, their increased abundance coincides with regional warming trends, and may result in higher offshore presence. Additionally, recent invasion by the Indo-Pacific red lionfish (Pterois volitans) into nGOM offshore habitats has been documented. Increases in tropically-associated confamilials, and invasive lionfish, could result in pronounced competitive interactions with nGOM reef fishes, such as juvenile red snapper (L. campechanus), and cause shifts in the species composition of offshore fish assemblages. We experimentally investigated the intensity of these interactions between increasingly abundant tropical snapper species, red lionfish, and indigenous members of the nGOM reef fish community. Compared to tropical counterparts, red snapper demonstrated increased roving behavior, aggression, and predatory activity, suggesting greater ability to exploitatively outcompete lower latitude snappers. However, lionfish were significantly more active than red snapper and range-shifting reef fishes, suggesting their potential to competitively displace nGOM fish species. Our findings contribute to the assessment of the potential impacts of warming-related species shifts and marine invasions upon the nGOM reef-associated fish community. Bio:

Note: These seminars are part of the 2014 Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar series.

Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


Round gobies in the Great Lakes Basin: How the spreading invasion is affecting diets and growth of top predators in Lake Huron tributaries.

Date: Wednesday, August 27, 2014 at 12:00-12:30 pm EDT

Speaker: Clarence Fullard, Aquatic Invasive Species Analyst, NOAA/NMFS, 2014 Knauss Sea Grant Fellow

Abstract: Round gobies (Neogobius melanostomus) are small (<150mm) benthic invasive fish now common to the Laurentian Great Lakes region. Although well studied in lakes, less research has investigated how the secondary invasion of round gobies into Great Lakes tributaries is changing riverine food webs. Previous studies have found increased predation of round gobies by smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu) in many areas of the Great Lakes where round gobies are common. This study used diet, growth, and stable isotope analysis of two lotic predators, smallmouth bass and rock bass (Ambloplites rupestris), to determine the impacts of round gobies to stream food webs in three Michigan rivers with different round goby abundances. Seasonal predation of round gobies occurred, but differed between predators and between rivers. There were positive relationships between round goby consumption and predator trophic positions, indicating that increased round goby populations are lengthening food chains leading to these predators. Contrary to other studies in the Great Lakes, increased round goby predation did not result in increased predator growth rates. Opportunistic and highly variable feeding habits may be buffering predators from significant changes to their trophic ecology and growth rates, which is contrary to the belief that these invasive fish are boosting the growth of popular game species.


Ocean Acidification and its potential affects on Alaska fisheries and communities.

Date: Monday, September 15, 2014 at 12:00pm EDT

Speaker: Dr. Jeremy Matthis, oceanographer at NOAA’s Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory in Seattle, and the director of the University of Alaska Fairbanks School of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences Ocean Acidification Research Center.

Abstract: Dr. Matthis' research is quite unique in that it assesses the risk of ocean acidification to fisheries and the communities that depend on them. His research also involved a broad partnership with NOAA Fisheries, University of Alaska and other institutions

Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


Geospatial Data Sharing and Collaborative Decision Making: Addressing Climate Resilience, Extreme Weather and National Preparedness.

Date: Thursday, September 18, 2014 at 12:00pm EDT

Speaker: Dave Jones, Founder & CEO, Applications Futurist, StormCenter Communications, Inc

Abstract:TBD

Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


NOAA Evaluation Training and Capacity Building Seminar Series

Date: Thursday, September 25, 2014 at 12:00pm EDT

Speaker: TBD

Abstract: TBD

This seminar is sponsored by the NOAA Evaluation Training and Capacity Building Work Group

Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


Brown Bag Seminar

Date: Thursday, October 16, 2014 at 12:00pm EDT

Speaker: TBD

Abstract: TBD

Note: This seminar is part of the 2014 Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar series.

Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


OER Maug Expedition Seminar

Date: Wednesday, October 22, 2014 at 12:00pm EDT

Speaker: TBD

Abstract: TBD

Note: This seminar is sponsored by the Office of Ocean Exploration.

Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


Does the driest part of the Sahara Desert have a rainy season?

Date: Wednesday, October 30, 2014 at 12:00pm EDT

Speaker: Owen Kelly, Research Scientist, NASA Goddard and George Mason University

Abstract: Within the Sahara Desert, there is a large region that receives less than 5 millimeters (0.2 inches) of rain a year on average, which makes this region one of the driest on Earth. Among the challenges to studying the climate of this region is that, in an area almost as large as the southeast United States, there are only four rain-gauge stations and no weather radars. Understandably, there has been a lack of consensus about the existence of any seasonal rainfall patterns here. This talk will present evidence for multiple rainy seasons in this extremely dry part of the Sahara Desert using 15-years of observations by the TRMM satellite, which was built by NASA and by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA). In particular, the TRMM satellite's precipitation radar and lightning sensor are used in this study. To validate seasonal patterns observed with TRMM, various African rain-gauge datasets were obtained from the NCDC, WMO, UCAR, and NOAA Central Library. Climate forecast models disagree about even the sign of the expected change in Saharan rainfall over the next century. Conceivably, improved documentation of current climate may facilitate an increase in consensus among climate forecasts.

Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


NOAA Evaluation Training and Capacity Building Seminar Series

Date: Thursday, November 6, 2014 at 12:00pm EDT

Speaker: TBD

Abstract: TBD

This seminar is sponsored by the NOAA Evaluation Training and Capacity Building Work Group

Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


Brown Bag Seminar

Date: Thursday, November 20, 2014 at 12:00pm EST

Speaker: TBD

Abstract: TBD

Note: This seminar is part of the 2014 Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar series.

Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


Brown Bag Seminar

Date: Thursday, December 18, 2014 at 12:00pm EST

Speaker: TBD

Abstract: TBD

Note: This seminar is part of the 2014 Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar series.

Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


Brown Bag Seminar

Date: Thursday, January 15, 2015 at 12:00pm EST

Speaker: TBD

Abstract: TBD

Note: This seminar is part of the 2014 Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar series.

Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


 

Additional seminars are scheduled through the OneNOAA Science Discussion Seminar Series

 

  Last modified:    Wed, 27-Aug-2014 17:46 UTC Library.Reference@noaa.gov
 
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