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NOAA Central Library Brown Bag Seminar Series

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General Information

All Brown Bag Seminars (unless otherwise noted) are held from 12:00pm - 1 p.m. in the NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring.

For remote access via webinar (unless specified otherwise below), please fill out the registration form a few minutes before the meeting is scheduled to begin. The Meeting Number is 742656968; the Passcode is brownbag. For audio in the US and Canada, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360.

Contact Mary Lou Cumberpatch (301-713-2600 ext. 140) or Albert (Skip) Theberge (301-713-2600 ext. 118) for further information or to set up a Brown Bag.

Archived Seminars

A list of previous Brown Bag Seminars and their accompanying Powerpoint presentations, when available, can be found on the Archive Brown Bags page.

 

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Upcoming Seminars

August 25 is Reserved for BIG event


Shrimper Attitudes and Bycatch Compliance in the Gulf of Mexico Shrimp Fishery

Date: Wednesday, August 26, 2015 at 12:00pm EST

Speaker: Dr. Jolvan T. Morris, Post-doctoral Research Fellow, NOAA Living Marine Cooperative Science Center at Savannah State University

Abstract: Bycatch reduction technology (BRT) is a popular way to protect endangered and threatened marine animals. The available literature on BRT primarily considers the biological elements of managing shrimp trawl fisheries but rarely addresses social acceptance of such protocols, despite the clear importance of human behavior to successful deployment of BRTs. Reasons why fishermen adopt or fail to comply with requirements for BRT, thus, are poorly understood. The Gulf of Mexico shrimp fishery, and its requirements for Turtle Excluder Devices (TEDs) to protect Gulf of Mexico sea turtle species, sharks, and marine mammals, offers a useful case study on BRT compliance. Research methods included a content analysis of shrimping regulation literature, and focused interviews and mail surveys that were administered to shrimp fishermen across three states in the Gulf of Mexico shrimp fishery: Texas, Louisiana and Florida. Results suggest that regardless of general environmental attitudes, the cost of buying TEDs and the revenue lost through lower catches tend to deter TED use, while increased knowledge regarding regulatory requirements, species endangerment status, and bycatch levels has no impact. Also improving compliance were increased participation in decision making in advance of deployment and certain social norms. Recommendations at the conclusion of this research outline how to include fishermen in decisionmaking for TED deployment, what management practices may promote compliance, and how to consider Environmental Justice and sustainability concerns while managing the Gulf of Mexico Shrimp fishery

About the Speaker: Dr. Jolvan Morris is a postdoctoral researcher working with Dr. Dionne Hoskins in the NOAA Living Marine Resources Cooperative Science Center at Savannah State University (SSU). Her principal research interests are Environmental Policy, Risk Communication, the Social Dimensions of Fisheries, and Environmental Justice issues in coastal communities. Dr. Morris's post-doctoral research focuses on the African American Fishermen Oral History Project at SSU. This initiative explores the roles and significance of fisheries in Gullah Geechee communities along the coast in the Southeastern United States. She earned her Master's degree and Ph.D. in Environmental Science from Florida A&M University in the NOAA Environmental Cooperative Science Center. Her Master's thesis focused on evaluating the biological and sociological issues surrounding the management of protected sturgeon species under Section 7 of the Endangered Species Act. Her dissertation research used socio-environmental synthesis to address compliance, participation, and environmental justice issues in the Gulf of Mexico shrimp fishery. Dr. Morris also spent two years as an intern at the Northeast Regional Office of the National Marine Fisheries Service assisting the Protected Resources Division with projects including Section 7 consultations, identifying critical habitat for protected marine species, and the development of educational outreach programs for K-12 students.

Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


The impact of the South Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation variability on extreme weather events in the Northern Hemisphere with particular emphasis on the US

Date and Time: Wednesday, September 2 at 12:00pm EST

Speaker: Dr. Hosmay Lopez (NOAA/AOML)

Co-authors: Dr. Shenfu Dong (NOAA/AOML), Dr. Gustavo Goni (NOAA/AOML),Dr. Sang-Ki Lee (NOAA/AOML)

Abstract: The global oceans distribute mass and heat through all basins in a large-scale circulation called the Meridional Overturning Circulation (MOC). This circulation in the Atlantic Ocean (AMOC) is composed of a northward-flowing branch in the upper ocean and a return flow at depths. The MOC component in the South Atlantic Ocean has been hypothesized to be of key importance for weather and climate. NOAA, and other US and international partners, are placing big efforts to monitor and understand the AMOC and associated Meridional Heat Transport (MHT) in the Atlantic at different latitudes. These efforts include monitoring the characteristics of the MHT, which are also used to validate climate models and to establish the link between AMOC and extreme weather events such as drought and heat waves. Here, we present results on one of the first attempts to link the MHT variability to extreme weather and climate. For this, a multi-century run from a coupled general circulation model is used as basis for the analysis. Results obtained indicate that weaker MHT leads to increase occurrence and severity of heat waves and droughts over Eastern Europe and Western North America. Weaker MHT is also associated with enhanced Northern Hemisphere summer monsoons. We conclude that the link between weaker MHT, stronger monsoons, and increased heat waves conditions and droughts over Europe and North America is through modification of the atmospheric circulation associated with changes in MHT. Also, results presented here suggest the possibility of decadal predictability of seasonal temperature and precipitation in that MHT in the South Atlantic Ocean could serve as potential predictor for decadal variability of droughts and heat waves over the US. The South Atlantic MHT also gives a lead-time of about 15 years from the anomalous heat transport to its weather effects over the US. These results highlight the value and need for studies involving continuous ocean observations and numerical models, necessary to improve our knowledge of the complex interaction between the SAMOC and its global impact on extreme weather.

About the Speaker: Dr. Hosmay Lopez graduated with a PHD in Meteorology and Physical Oceanography from the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences at the University of Miami in 2013. He currently holds a Post-doctoral Associate position at the NOAA - University of Miami, Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies. He works at the Physical Oceanography Division of NOAA/AOML, in Miami, FL. His main area of research is to study the links between the Atlantic Ocean and extreme weather events using numerical models.

Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar

Date: Thursday, September 17, 2015 at 12:00pm EST

Speaker: TBD

Abstract: TBD

Note: This seminar is part of the 2015 Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar series .

Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


The Atlantic Hurricane Database Reanalysis Project

Date: Friday, 18, 2015 at 12:00pm EST

Speaker: Christopher W. Landsea, NOAA/NWS/NCEP/National Hurricane Center

Abstract:A re-analysis of the Atlantic basin tropical storm and hurricane database (HURDAT2, otherwise known as "best tracks") for the period of 1851 to 1955 has been completed with the remainder of the 20th Century still ongoing. This reworking and extension back in time of the main archive for tropical cyclones of the North Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean Sea and Gulf of Mexico was necessary to correct systematic and random errors and biases in the data as well as to incorporate observations that may not have been available at the time. The re-analysis project provides the revised tropical storm and hurricane database, a metadata file detailing individual changes for each tropical cyclone, a "center fix" file of raw tropical cyclone observations, details for U.S. landfalling tropical storms and hurricanes, and comments from/replies to the Best Track Change Committee. This presentation details the methodologies used for this re-analysis of the Atlantic tropical cyclone record as well as some of the highlights of the most important changes made.

About the Speaker:TBD


State of the Tropics: Unique ecosystems, rapid growth and a new global dynamic

Date: Tuesday, September 22, 2015 at 12:00pm EST

Speaker: Professor Sandra Harding, Vice Chancellor and President of James Cook University

Abstract: Over the past half-century the Tropics has emerged as an increasingly important region. More than 40% of the world's population live in the Tropics, the region's economy is growing 20% faster than the rest of the world, it hosts around 80% of the world's biological diversity and it includes some of the world's most culturally diverse regions. Rapid population and economic growth mean it is a region whose influence is set to rise dramatically in coming decades. The nature of this influence will depend on how the region addresses its many challenges, and whether it realises its potential and opportunities. The range and significance of shared issues facing nations and territories in the Tropics suggests it is timely to examine the characteristics and challenges facing the tropical region as an entity in itself.

State of the Tropics is a multi-disciplinary project that has brought together key research institutions across the Tropics to answer a nominally simple question: "Is life in the Tropics improving?" Recognizing shared connections and issues, while acknowledging variable responses between regions, we report that across a broad range of environmental, social and economic indicators, the region has made extraordinary progress in recent decades. Life is indeed improving on several fronts. However, the region is at a critical juncture. The resources required to sustain larger populations and economic growth are putting significant and increasing pressures on the natural environment. This presentation will explore some of the critical issues facing the Tropics and how we might work towards a prosperous and sustainable future for the Tropics worldwide.

About the Speaker: Professor Sandra Harding took up her appointment as Vice Chancellor and President of James Cook University Australia in January 2007. In this role, she is responsible for ensuring clear and effective leadership and management of the University across all operating sites, including campuses in Cairns, Singapore and Townsville. Professor Harding has extensive academic and academic leadership experience. An economic sociologist by training, her areas of enduring academic interest include work, organisation and markets and how they work. She also has a keen interest in public policy in two areas: education policy and related areas; and the global Tropics, northern Australia and economic development. Professor Harding has undertaken a wide variety of external roles within the business community and the higher education sector. Current roles include: Councillor, Queensland Futures Institute; Member, Trade and Investment Policy Advisory Committee (advising Minister Andrew Robb, Minister for Trade and Investment); Member, the Australia-China Council Board; Co-Vice Chair, the New Colombo Plan Reference Group; Director, Regional Australia Institute; Council Member, the Australian Institute of Marine Science; Director, North Queensland Cowboys National Rugby League club; Director of Townsville Enterprise and of Advance Cairns (regional economic development bodies); and; a Governor of the Committee for Economic Development of Australia (CEDA). She has recently been appointed a member of the Australian Government's Research Policy and Funding Working Group (assisting Dr Ian Watt AO).

Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar

Date: Thursday, September 24, 2015 at 12:00pm EST

Speaker: TBD

Abstract: TBD

Note: This seminar is part of the 2015 Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar series .

Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


Telling the NOAA Story through Social Media

Date: September 30, 2015 at 12:00pm EST

Speaker: Leesha Saunders, NESDIS

Abstract: Social media was initially developed for sharing photos and personal antidotes. However, with careful planning, plus accessing and using the right tools, offices can develop dynamic, effective social media based on NOAA science. This session will touch on how NOAA offices can cultivate a personable and informative social media presence, some do's and don'ts, tips on how to best further your brand and more.

About the Speaker: Leesha Saunders has been with NOAA's Satellite and Information Service (called NESDIS) since February 2008 as a part of its communication team. Her responsibilities have ranged from setting up NESDIS exhibits around the country to managing the agency's flourishing social media presence, which includes Facebook, with more than 67,000 likes and Twitter, with more than 96,000 followers. Leesha is a graduate of the Georgetown University Center for Continuing & Professional Education in Washington, D.C., with a certificate in Social Media Management. In addition, Leesha holds a BA from the University of Maryland, University College in Communications Studies with a minor in fine Art. While at NESDIS, Leesha also has established other social media platforms including the NESDIS YouTube and Flickr accounts. Before NOAA released its social media handbook,Leesha developed a NESDIS Facebook handbook, which was later expanded to the NESDIS social media handbook, along with other guides. All NESDIS offices, with social media platforms, use the handbooks as operating tools and templates

Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar

Date: Thursday, October 1, 2015 at 12:00pm EST

Speaker: TBD

Abstract: TBD

About the Speaker:

Note: This seminar is part of the 2015 Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar series .

Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar

Date: Thursday, October 15, 2015 at 12:00pm EST

Speaker: TBD

Abstract: TBD

Note: This seminar is part of the 2015 Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar series .

Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar

Date: Thursday, November 12, 2015 at 12:00pm EST

Speaker: TBD

Abstract: TBD

Note: This seminar is part of the 2015 Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar series .

Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


 

Additional seminars are scheduled through the OneNOAA Science Discussion Seminar Series

 

  Last modified:    Mon, 24-Aug-2015 16:56 UTC Library.Reference@noaa.gov
 
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