NOAA Central Library
 Contact Us | Catalog | Ask-A-Librarian | Feedback | A-Z Index
All of NOAA

NOAA Central Library Brown Bag Seminar Series

rss feed icon Sign up for our RSS Feed to be automatically notified of library events each week. What is RSS?

General Information

All Brown Bag Seminars (unless otherwise noted) are held from 12:00pm - 1 p.m. in the NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring.

For remote access via webinar (unless specified otherwise below), please fill out the registration form a few minutes before the meeting is scheduled to begin. The Meeting Number is 742656968; the Passcode is brownbag. For audio in the US and Canada, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360.

Contact Mary Lou Cumberpatch (301-713-2600 ext. 140) or Albert (Skip) Theberge (301-713-2600 ext. 118) for further information or to set up a Brown Bag.

Archived Seminars

A list of previous Brown Bag Seminars and their accompanying Powerpoint presentations, when available, can be found on the Archive Brown Bags page.

 

blue line

Upcoming Seminars

Harnessing Stakeholder Engagement to Produce Useful and Usable Science: a Qualitative Evaluation of Great Lakes Restoration Research Grants

Date: Wednesday, April 22, 2015 at 12:00-12:30 pm EST

Speaker: Rachel Jacobson, Program Planning and Integration Social Science Team, rachel.jacobson@noaa.gov

Abstract: The Water Center at the Graham Sustainability Institute is a grant-making organization affiliated with the University of Michigan focused on freshwater restoration and protection. Following implementation of its first funding competition for research, the Water Center sought to evaluate 1) to what extent its grant-making strategies and guidelines influenced the quantity and quality of stakeholder interaction with research teams; 2) to what extent this interaction resulted in increased use of the knowledge produced by stakeholders; and 3) how its grant-making guidelines shaped the development of the research and research teams. We conducted 30 qualitative interviews with PI's, project teams, and stakeholders, and undertook detailed documentary analysis of the RFP instrument, project reports, and other materials for ten grant projects. Coding and analysis revealed that previous PI experience, culture differences, timing, and availability and appropriation of time and resources were significant factors influencing the quantity and quality of stakeholder engagement. Results showed a need for better stakeholder mapping and resource allocation guidance during early phases of projects, and pointed to benefits of allowing flexibility in grant requirements based on project type. This seminar is part of the 2015 Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar series .

Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


The Little Mussel That Could: Phosphorus Recycling by Dreissenids in Lake Michigan

Date: Wednesday, April 22, 2015 at 12:30-1:00 pm EST

Speaker: Caroline Mosley, NOAA OAR Communications, caroline.mosley@noaa.gov

Abstract: The effects of dreissenid mussels on plankton abundance and nutrient cycling in shallow, productive water of the Great Lakes have been well-documented, but the effects of their more recent expansion into oligotrophic, offshore regions have received much less attention. Understanding quagga mussel impact on Lake Michigan's phosphorus (P) fluxes is critical in assessing long-term implications for nutrient cycling and energy flow. In this study, P excretion and egestion rates were determined for mussels in the hypolimnion of Lake Michigan. Constant low temperatures and limited food supply contributed to a lower basal P excretion rate in profunda quagga mussels compared to the shallow phenotype. The P excretion:egestion ratio was approximately 3:2, highlighting the need to consider both of these pathways when assessing the effect of these filer feeders on nutrient dynamics. Total dissolved P (TDP) excretion rates ranges from 0.0002 to 0.0124 umol L-1, soluble reactive P (SRP) excretion rates ranged from 0.0003 to 0.0061 umol L-1, and particulate P (PP) egestion rates (feces + pseudofeces) ranged from 0.0007 to 0.0269 umol L-1. The ability of profunda mussels to alter P cycling dynamics is reflected in an increase in the hypolimnetic dissolved:particulate P ratio and the disappearance of the benthic nepheloid layer. On an areal basis, mussel P recycling rates are up to 11 times greater than P settling rates as determined by sediment traps, suggesting that mussel grazing has resulted in an increased delivery rate of P to the deep benthos and a shorter P residence time in the water column. Note: This seminar is part of the 2015 Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar series.

Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


Out of sight but not out of mind: Harmful effects of derelict traps in selected U.S. coastal waters

Date: Wednesday, April 29, 2015 at 12:00pm EST

Speaker: Courtney Arthur, NOAA's Marine Debris Division, Peter Murphy, NOAA's Marine Debris Division, Holly Bamford, Assistant Administrator, National Ocean Service, Ariana Sutton-Grier, University of Maryland, Cooperative Institute for Climate and Satellites

Abstract: There is a paucity of data in the published literature on the ecological and economic impacts of derelict fishing traps (DFTs) in coastal ecosystems. We synthesized results from seven NOAA-funded trap fisheries studies around the United States and determined that DFT-caused losses to habitat and harvestable annual catch are pervasive, persistent, and largely preventable. Based on this synthesis, we identified key gaps to fill in order to better manage and prevent DFTs. We conclude with suggestions for developing a U.S. DFT management strategy including: (1) targeting studies to estimate mortality of fishery stocks, (2) assessing the economic impacts of DFTs on fisheries, (3) collaborating with the fishing industry to develop solutions to ghost fishing, and (4) examining the regional context and challenges resulting in DFTs to find effective policy solutions to manage, reduce, and prevent gear loss.D

Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


Climate Change Projections from High-Resolution Global Models and the Implications for Fisheries Management in the U.S. Northeast Shelf Marine Ecosystem

Date: Wednesday, May 5, 2015 at 12:00pm EST

Speaker: Vincent S. Saba, Ph.D., Research Fishery Biologist, NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service, Northeast Fisheries Science Center, Ecosystem Assessment Program, Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory,Princeton University

Abstract: Over the past 20 years, ocean surface temperature in the United States Northeast Shelf (U.S. NES) has warmed at a substantially higher rate than the global average. To date, all climate change projections for species within the U.S. NES have been based on climate models that have a coarse ocean resolution (1 x1 degree global). These coarse models do not resolve the fine-scale bathymetry (i.e. Georges Bank, Northeast Channel) of the U.S. NES, nor do they resolve the correct position of the Northwestern wall of the Gulf Stream. Here we used high-resolution global climate models from the NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory to assess differences in climate change projections for the U.S. NES as a function model resolution. We found that the high-resolution climate model (0.1 x 0.1 degree global ocean) resolves water mass circulation much more accurately than the standard coarse models. Climate change projections of sea surface temperature and bottom temperature within the U.S. NES based on the high-resolution model are up to 1.5 C (surface) to 3 C (bottom) warmer than the projections based on the coarse models. Therefore, existing projections for the U.S. NES are conservative and thus impacts to fisheries may be greater than the current climate change projections.

About the Speaker Dr. Vincent Saba is a Research Fishery Biologist with the Northeast Fisheries Science Center's Ecosystem Assessment Program. He resides at the NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) in Princeton, New Jersey. Dr. Saba received a B.S. and M.S in Environmental Science from Drexel University. He earned a Ph.D. in Marine Science from the College of William and Mary - Virginia Institute of Marine Science. His research focuses on climate impacts on marine ecosystems. His research scales the marine food web ranging from phytoplankton to top predators. Much of his current research involves the use of NOAA GFDL's high-resolution global climate models for their use in regional marine ecosystems such as the U.S. Northeast Continental Shelf.

Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


Visualize Your Data and Results

Date: Wednesday, May 20, 2015 at 12:00pm EST

Speaker: James Hartman, Technical Director, Quantitative Methods Division, Office of the Inspector General, Department of Defense

Abstract:

  • "A picture is worth a thousand words" as the saying goes
  • Do your charts and graphs present your information as effectively as a picture?
  • Is the information content readily understandable?
  • Learn the fundamentals of effectively visualizing data and results to make more compelling visualizations
  • Immediately following the presentation there will be a one hour follow-on session to disucss your specific challenges and provide additional examples. Participants are invited to submit examples of their data and results (in advance) for discussions on improving presentation. Contact Monica.Montague or John.Bortniak for information on this follow-up session.

Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.

Note:

This seminar is sponsored by the NOAA Evaluation Training and Capacity Building Work Group.


The 2013-2014 Survey of the Washington Monument

Date: Thursday, May 21, 2015 at 12:00pm EST

Speaker: Dru Smith, PhD, Chief Geodesist, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey

Abstract: After the 5.8 - magnitude earthquake of Virginia on August 23, 2011, scaffolding was built around the Washington Monument (WM) to facilitate repairs made to the building in 2013 and 2014. This provided a rare opportunity for NOAA's National Geodetic Survey (NGS) to perform a geodetic survey incorporating direct occupation of the WM peak with multiple instruments. The goal of this survey was to provide a baseline position of the peak so accurate that future surveys would be able to detect sinking, shrinking or tilting of the monument.

This was only the third time in history (1934 and 1999 being the others) that NGS was able to use geodetic instruments at the peak. However it was the first time that a complete three-dimensional position, accurate to a millimeter, was achieved.

As an interesting by-product of the survey, an architectural height of the monument, using modern international standards, was determined. This new height is in disagreement with the historic height by almost 10 inches, almost all of which is due to the location at the base of the monument from which the height was measured. However, by adopting the standards used in 1884, NGS was able to validate the historic height to within 3/4 of an inch. This talk will outline the history of surveys at the WM as well as the highlights of the most recent survey.

About the Speaker: Dr. Dru Smith has been the Chief Geodesist of NOAA's National Geodetic Survey since 2005. He first entered NGS in 1995 after receiving his Ph.D. in geodetic science from The Ohio State University. His original job with NGS was in geoid modeling. He has also been active in developing U.S. GPS policy and modeling the ionosphere using the CORS network.

In 2008 he led the development of the GRAV-D plan, and in 2012 led the development of the NGS Ten Year Plan (2013-2023). In 2011 he was the principal investigator for the Geoid Slope Validation Survey of 2011, which proved that airborne data from GRAV-D yielded a 1 cm accurate geoid model. For his leadership of that study he was awarded the Department of Commerce's Gold Medal, their highest award.

He is a member of the Institute of Navigation, the American Geophysical Union, the International Association of Geodesy and is a Fellow of the American Congress on Surveying and Mapping (now the National Society of Professional Surveyors). He holds special appointments as a member of the Graduate Faculty of both Texas A&M University and the University of Rhode Island. He serves on the Board of Directors of the Conrad Blucher Institute for Surveying and Science and on the Advisory Board of the Department of Civil, Environmental and Geodetic Engineering at The Ohio State University and has previously served on the Board of Directors for the American Association for Geodetic Surveying.

Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


Marine National Monuments and NOAA: Come find out what makes a Monument different than a Sanctuary, and learn about NOAA's Marine National Monument Program

Date: May 26, 2015 at 12:00pm EST

Speaker: Samantha Brooke, Marine National Monuments Program Manager

Abstract: There are a total of four marine national monuments in the United States, all located in the Pacific Ocean: Papahanaumokuakea (designated in 2006), Marianas Trench (designated in 2009), Rose Atoll (designated in 2009), and the Pacific Remote Islands (designated in 2009 and expanded in 2014). NOAA co-manages each of these extraordinary places, which are home to near-pristine coral reefs, large apex predator populations, rare and endangered species, and unique geological features. The Monuments also are intimately connected with the cultures and communities of Pacific peoples. As a co-manager, NOAA is charged with implementing the Presidential Proclamations through the development of management plans and research programs to preserve and protect them. An overview of the Monuments Program will be provided, along with a short introduction to each Monument and an summary of exciting developments.

About the Speaker: Samantha G. Brooke is the Program Manager for NOAA Fisheries Pacific Islands Regional Office in Honolulu, Hawaii. She has spent nearly decade working for NOAA Fisheries programs, including the Northwest Regional Office, Protected Resources Division in Seattle, Washington and the Office of Science and Technologies National Observer Program in Silver Spring, Maryland.


Brown Bag Seminar

Date: Thursday, May 28, 2015 at 12:00pm EST

Speaker: TBD

Abstract: TBD

Note: This seminar is part of the 2015 Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar series .

Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


Brown Bag Seminar

Date: Thursday, June 16, 2015 at 12:00pm EST

Speaker: TBD

Abstract: TBD

Note: This seminar is part of the 2015 Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar series .

Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


Brown Bag Seminar

Date: Thursday, July 9, 2015 at 12:00pm EST

Speaker: TBD

Abstract: TBD

Note: This seminar is part of the 2015 Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar series .

Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


Brown Bag Seminar

Date: Thursday, July 16, 2015 at 12:00pm EST

Speaker: TBD

Abstract: TBD

Note: This seminar is part of the 2015 Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar series .

Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


Brown Bag Seminar

Date: Thursday, August 20, 2015 at 12:00pm EST

Speaker: TBD

Abstract: TBD

Note: This seminar is part of the 2015 Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar series .

Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


Brown Bag Seminar

Date: Thursday, September 17, 2015 at 12:00pm EST

Speaker: TBD

Abstract: TBD

Note: This seminar is part of the 2015 Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar series .

Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


Brown Bag Seminar

Date: Thursday, October 15, 2015 at 12:00pm EST

Speaker: TBD

Abstract: TBD

Note: This seminar is part of the 2015 Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar series .

Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


 

Additional seminars are scheduled through the OneNOAA Science Discussion Seminar Series

 

  Last modified:    Fri, 17-Apr-2015 14:24 UTC Library.Reference@noaa.gov
 
Dept. of Commerce - NOAA - NESDIS - NCEI
* External link: You will be leaving the Federal
   Government by following an external link.
USA.gov - The U.S. Government's Web Portal