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NOAA Central Library Brown Bag Seminar Series

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General Information

All Brown Bag Seminars (unless otherwise noted) are held from 12:00pm - 1 p.m. in the NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring.

For remote access via webinar (unless specified otherwise below), please fill out the registration form a few minutes before the meeting is scheduled to begin. The Meeting Number is 742656968; the Passcode is brownbag. For audio in the US and Canada, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360.

Contact Mary Lou Cumberpatch (301-713-2600 ext. 140) or Albert (Skip) Theberge (301-713-2600 ext. 118) for further information or to set up a Brown Bag.

Archived Seminars

A list of previous Brown Bag Seminars and their accompanying Powerpoint presentations, when available, can be found on the Archive Brown Bags page.

 

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Upcoming Seminars

Social Media and Severe Weather: What Do We Know and Where are We Going?

Date: Thursday, July 24, 2014 at 12:00pm EDT

Speaker: Joe Ripberger, CIMMS, National Severe Storms Laboratory

Abstract: According to a recent report by the Department of Homeland Security, "social media and collaborative technologies have become critical components of emergency preparedness, response, and recovery" (2013). These technologies are critical because they provide a centralized mechanism for two-way communication before, during, and after disasters that allows the National Weather Service, Emergency Managers, the media, and affected communities to disseminate and receive information about a hazard in near real-time. As yet, however, we know relative little about who participates in this exchange of information and how it transpires throughout the course of an event. In this presentation, I will address this void by answering three basic yet important research questions: (1) Who uses social media to get information about severe weather and how has this evolved over time? (2) How does social media usage evolve throughout the course of a severe weather event? (3) What do meteorologists and forecasters think about social media and how has it changed the way they approach their jobs?

Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


Case-Zablocki Act

Date: Friday, July 25, 2014 at 12:00pm EDT

Speaker: Hugh Schratwieser, NOAA Office of General Counsel

Abstract: This brown bag presentation will address the law and policies regarding international agreements and memoranda of understanding between NOAA and counterparts in foreign nations. Hugh Schratwieser of the NOAA Office of General Counsel Weather, Satellites and Research Section will provide an overview of the Case-Zablocki Act and its implementation by the Department of Commerce and NOAA's Office of General Counsel. Authority for making most determinations under the Case-Zablocki Act for NOAA international agreements is delegated to the NOAA General Counsel by the Department of Commerce General Counsel. Additional information on the Case-Zablocki Act and its implementation by the Department of Commerce and NOAA is available online at http://www.gc.noaa.gov/gc_case_zablocki.html. NOAA GC guidance on legal determinations under the Case-Zablocki Act is available online at http://www.gc.noaa.gov/documents/082604-faq-case-act-2p.pdf.

Note: This seminar is sponsored by the International Section of the NOAA Office of General Counsel.

Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


Round gobies in the Great Lakes Basin: How the spreading invasion is affecting diets and growth of top predators in Lake Huron tributaries.

Date: Tuesday, July 29, 2014 at 12:00-12:30 pm EDT

Speaker: Clarence Fullard, Aquatic Invasive Species Analyst, NOAA/NMFS, 2014 Knauss Sea Grant Fellow

Abstract: Round gobies (Neogobius melanostomus) are small (<150mm) benthic invasive fish now common to the Laurentian Great Lakes region. Although well studied in lakes, less research has investigated how the secondary invasion of round gobies into Great Lakes tributaries is changing riverine food webs. Previous studies have found increased predation of round gobies by smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu) in many areas of the Great Lakes where round gobies are common. This study used diet, growth, and stable isotope analysis of two lotic predators, smallmouth bass and rock bass (Ambloplites rupestris), to determine the impacts of round gobies to stream food webs in three Michigan rivers with different round goby abundances. Seasonal predation of round gobies occurred, but differed between predators and between rivers. There were positive relationships between round goby consumption and predator trophic positions, indicating that increased round goby populations are lengthening food chains leading to these predators. Contrary to other studies in the Great Lakes, increased round goby predation did not result in increased predator growth rates. Opportunistic and highly variable feeding habits may be buffering predators from significant changes to their trophic ecology and growth rates, which is contrary to the belief that these invasive fish are boosting the growth of popular game species.


Ecological Impacts of Climate-Related Ichthyofaunal Shifts and Invasive Lionfish on the Northern Gulf of Mexico Reef Fish Community

Date: Tuesday, July 29, 2014 at 12:30-1:00pm EDT

Speaker: Tony Marshak, Office of Science and Technology, NOAA Fisheries

Abstract: Large and apparently unprecedented increases in the abundance of juvenile gray (Lutjanus griseus) and lane snapper (L. synagris) within northern Gulf of Mexico (nGOM) seagrasses have been recently documented. Although previously occurring infrequently within the nGOM, their increased abundance coincides with regional warming trends, and may result in higher offshore presence. Additionally, recent invasion by the Indo-Pacific red lionfish (Pterois volitans) into nGOM offshore habitats has been documented. Increases in tropically-associated confamilials, and invasive lionfish, could result in pronounced competitive interactions with nGOM reef fishes, such as juvenile red snapper (L. campechanus), and cause shifts in the species composition of offshore fish assemblages. We experimentally investigated the intensity of these interactions between increasingly abundant tropical snapper species, red lionfish, and indigenous members of the nGOM reef fish community. Compared to tropical counterparts, red snapper demonstrated increased roving behavior, aggression, and predatory activity, suggesting greater ability to exploitatively outcompete lower latitude snappers. However, lionfish were significantly more active than red snapper and range-shifting reef fishes, suggesting their potential to competitively displace nGOM fish species. Our findings contribute to the assessment of the potential impacts of warming-related species shifts and marine invasions upon the nGOM reef-associated fish community. Bio:

Note: These seminars are part of the 2014 Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar series.

Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


Hurricane Sandy and SWATH Network

Date: Thursday, July 31, 2014 at 12:00pm EDT

Speaker: Robert Mason and Harry Jenter, USGS, John Fulton, NOAA

Abstract: Understanding the evolution and dissipation of overland storm tides and waves as they move across natural and manmade landscapes is critical to increasing coastal resilience and establishing early warning systems for coastal storm hazards. In the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy, the USGS is building an overland Surge, Wave, and Tide Hydrodynamics (SWaTH) network along the Atlantic Coast from Virginia through Maine to provide more timely storm-surge and wave data to enhance public awareness, help forecasters predict surge impacts, and inform emergency responders. During this brown-bag presentation the presenters will describe plans for implementation of the SWaTH and discuss collaborative opportunities and user needs and solicit input from NOAA scientists and engineers.

Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


Developing Holistic Marine Data Management Solutions

Date: Wednesday, August 13, 2014 at 12:00pm EDT

Speaker: Rob Bochenek, Information Architect and CEO, Axiom Data Science -- Rob Bochenek is an information Architect at Axiom Data Science an Anchorage based data science and cyberinfrastructure technology firm. Rob has over 15 years experience developing data management systems for a wide array of ecological and geophysical data types and user groups. He is also the technical lead for the Central and Northern California Observing System (CeNCOOS) and the Alaska Ocean Observing System (AOOS) which are both regional associations for the Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS).

Abstract: Data management of marine and coastal research data is particularly challenging because it can include a vast range of subjects and variables. Data relevant to marine scientists may include field, expedition or cruise observations, laboratory analyses, data from remote sensing satellite and observational platforms, model outputs, and various other sources. From a systems-level perspective, model and satellite data are often in standardized data formats and are easier to manage in an automated fashion than project level data (e.g., ad hoc spreadsheets and databases). However, these project data may be complex in nature, large in size (megabytes to terabytes) and packaged in advanced formats. Project data typically require individualized review, and even experts within subfields may have difficulty using data from different sources because of the plethora of data collection protocols. This talk will explore these issues more deeply, discuss strategies and demonstrate several technologies which have been developed to address these problems in a holistic way. The Research Workspace, being actively used by several NOAA research campaigns, will be presented as a solution for researchers to centralize, secure, share, document and publish projects, data and metadata. Additionally, several examples of cyberinfrastructure, developed with funding from NOAA and others, will be demonstrated which enable data resources (GIS, numerical models/remote sensed, sensor networks, time series and research project assets) to be discovered, integrated and visualized. Examples of these types of systems can be accessed online at http://portal.aoos.org/ and http://data.cencoos.org/.

Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


Brown Bag Seminar

Date: Thursday, August 21, 2014 at 12:00pm EDT

Speaker: TBD

Abstract: TBD

Note: This seminar is part of the 2014 Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar series.

Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


Hurricane Sandy and SWATH Network

Date: Tuesday, August 26, 2014 at 12:00pm EDT

Speaker: Robert Mason and Harry Jenter, USGS, John Fulton, NOAA

Abstract: Understanding the evolution and dissipation of overland storm tides and waves as they move across natural and manmade landscapes is critical to increasing coastal resilience and establishing early warning systems for coastal storm hazards. In the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy, the USGS is building an overland Surge, Wave, and Tide Hydrodynamics (SWaTH) network along the Atlantic Coast from Virginia through Maine to provide more timely storm-surge and wave data to enhance public awareness, help forecasters predict surge impacts, and inform emergency responders. During this brown-bag presentation the presenters will describe plans for implementation of the SWaTH and discuss collaborative opportunities and user needs and solicit input from NOAA scientists and engineers.

Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


Geospatial Data Sharing and Collaborative Decision Making: Addressing Climate Resilience, Extreme Weather and National Preparedness.

Date: Thursday, September 18, 2014 at 12:00pm EDT

Speaker: Dave Jones, Founder & CEO, Applications Futurist, StormCenter Communications, Inc

Abstract: TBD

Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


Brown Bag Seminar

Date: Thursday, October 16, 2014 at 12:00pm EDT

Speaker: TBD

Abstract: TBD

Note: This seminar is part of the 2014 Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar series.

Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


OER Maug Expedition Seminar

Date: Wednesday, October 22, 2014 at 12:00pm EDT

Speaker: TBD

Abstract: TBD

Note: This seminar is sponsored by the Office of Ocean Exploration.

Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


Does the driest part of the Sahara Desert have a rainy season?

Date: Wednesday, October 30, 2014 at 12:00pm EDT

Speaker: Owen Kelly, Research Scientist, NASA Goddard and George Mason University

Abstract: Within the Sahara Desert, there is a large region that receives less than 5 millimeters (0.2 inches) of rain a year on average, which makes this region one of the driest on Earth. Among the challenges to studying the climate of this region is that, in an area almost as large as the southeast United States, there are only four rain-gauge stations and no weather radars. Understandably, there has been a lack of consensus about the existence of any seasonal rainfall patterns here. This talk will present evidence for multiple rainy seasons in this extremely dry part of the Sahara Desert using 15-years of observations by the TRMM satellite, which was built by NASA and by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA). In particular, the TRMM satellite's precipitation radar and lightning sensor are used in this study. To validate seasonal patterns observed with TRMM, various African rain-gauge datasets were obtained from the NCDC, WMO, UCAR, and NOAA Central Library. Climate forecast models disagree about even the sign of the expected change in Saharan rainfall over the next century. Conceivably, improved documentation of current climate may facilitate an increase in consensus among climate forecasts.

Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


Brown Bag Seminar

Date: Thursday, November 20, 2014 at 12:00pm EST

Speaker: TBD

Abstract: TBD

Note: This seminar is part of the 2014 Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar series.

Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


Brown Bag Seminar

Date: Thursday, December 18, 2014 at 12:00pm EST

Speaker: TBD

Abstract: TBD

Note: This seminar is part of the 2014 Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar series.

Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


Brown Bag Seminar

Date: Thursday, January 15, 2015 at 12:00pm EST

Speaker: TBD

Abstract: TBD

Note: This seminar is part of the 2014 Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar series.

Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


 

Additional seminars are scheduled through the OneNOAA Science Discussion Seminar Series

 

  Last modified:    Wed, 23-Jul-2014 20:27 UTC Library.Reference@noaa.gov
 
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