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NOAA Central Library Brown Bag Seminar Series

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General Information

All Brown Bag Seminars (unless otherwise noted) are held from 12:00pm - 1 p.m. in the NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC#3, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring.

For remote access via webinar (unless specified otherwise below), please fill out the registration form a few minutes before the meeting is scheduled to begin. The Meeting Number is 742656968; the Passcode is brownbag. For audio in the US and Canada, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360.

Contact Mary Lou Cumberpatch (301-713-2600 ext. 140) or Albert (Skip) Theberge (301-713-2600 ext. 118) for further information or to set up a Brown Bag.

Archived Seminars

A list of previous Brown Bag Seminars and their accompanying Powerpoint presentations, when available, can be found on the Archive Brown Bags page.

 

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Upcoming Seminars

A case study for urban estuaries: All about the Delaware!

Date: Thursday, October 16, 2014 at 12:00pm EDT

Speaker: Anna Hermes, NOAA Research Office of Labs and Cooperative Institutes and the Science Advisory Board, New Jersey Sea Grant Knauss Fellow, anna.hermes@noaa.gov

Abstract: Estuaries link terrestrial and marine biomes. They are locations of great complexity, with interwoven and often competing human and natural systems, now facing further and often un-quantified impacts from climate change. They provide conduits for trade, fresh drinking water for urban cities, and natural resources such as fisheries, and simultaneously often also sustain incredibly diverse wetlands, house migratory species, and act as buffers from storms. Balancing these often opposing forces requires a basic understanding of the physical, chemical, and biological processes of estuaries. Here, the Delaware Estuary is used as a case study. This presentation will demonstrate that long- term, interdisciplinary research programs can provide a more holistic understanding of how these components are interconnected, while specifically addressing the biogeochemistry of the Delaware. Sources of particulate organic carbon through the estuary for multiple seasons were assessed using stable carbon isotopes and organic biomarkers. Biomarker distributions revealed that bottom waters are geochemically distinct from surface waters, and that land-derived organic carbon is trapped in bottom waters where fresh and saltwater meet. Compound specific stable carbon isotopes of the biomarkers further suggest that a significant proportion of the land-derived material trapped mid-estuary is derived from marshes in the lower estuary. These results have implications for how land and sediment management practices will impact the overall carbon cycling in the Delaware, and also demonstrate the connectivities in these systems that can be identified through integrative study.

Note: This seminar is part of the 2014 Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar series.

Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


Blue Crabs and Freshwater Inflows: Local Behaviors to Global Perspectives

Date: Thursday, October 16, 2014 at 12:30 pm

Speaker: Kimberly Bittler, Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement, Department of the Interior, Texas Sea Grant Knauss Fellow, kmbittler@gmail.com

Abstract: Freshwater inflows are critical for the function and health of estuaries, but can become severely limited due to human use, drought, and diversions. The management of limited freshwater inflows is a growing concern, and the use of a focal species such as blue crabs can assist managers in allocating this limited resource. Previous studies have suggested that freshwater inflows affect populations of the commercially and ecologically important blue crab, Callinectes sapidus, especially in early life stages, but the nature and geographic extent of the relationship is unclear. The potential link between freshwater inflows and recruitment of blue crab post-larvae was examined in a series of behavior experiments and coupled models, and compared between case study systems. Broader relationships between abundance and salinity were examined from a global perspective by synthesizing available data on blue crab abundance from the Gulf of Mexico to the Mid-Atlantic. The results of these studies have implications for the management of freshwater inflows and blue crab stock management, and will aid managers as pressures on blue crab populations continue to grow in the future.

Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


Title: Wind turbine wake characterization with remote sensing and computational fluid dynamics

Date: Tuesday, October 21, 2014 at 12:00 pm

Speaker: Matthew Aitken, PhD, ORISE Research Fellow US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Research Triangle Park, NC

Abstract: Wind farm wake modeling, and hence turbine layout optimization, currently suffer from an unacceptable degree of uncertainty, largely because of a lack of adequate experimental data for model verification. Here, we analyze wake measurements taken with long-range scanning lidar in two separate experiments, one at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) and the other at a wind farm in the western United States. The presentation outlines a set of quantitative procedures for determining critical parameters from these extensive datasets—such as the velocity deficit, the size of the wake boundary, and the location of the wake centerline and the results are categorized by ambient atmospheric conditions. Despite specific reference to lidar, the methodology is general and can be applied to extract wake characteristics from other remote sensor datasets as well as output from numerical simulations. Experimental results are compared to a large eddy simulation (LES) of a turbine operating in the stable boundary layer using the actuator disk parameterization in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model.

About the Speaker: Matthew Aitken, PhD, is currently an ORISE Research Fellow with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in Research Triangle Park, NC, where he is researching the use of the Market Allocation (MARKAL) energy system model to assess the economic and environmental implications of a variety of clean energy technologies. He recently received his PhD in physics from the University of Colorado, Boulder, where he developed a statistical modeling procedure for quantifying wind turbine wake characteristics from both lidar measurements and CFD simulations, to help advance the optimization of turbine layouts and control systems at wind farms.

Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


Volcanic Ocean Acidification and Coral Reef Ecosystem Study at Maug, Northern Mariana Islands

Date: Wednesday, October 22, 2014 at 12:00pm EDT

Speaker: David Butterfield, Joint Institute for the Study of the Atmosphere and Ocean, University of Washington and Pacific Marine Environmental Lab, Seattle

Abstract: Carbon dioxide emitted by volcanoes in the upper ocean over long timespans creates unique natural undersea laboratories to study the impact of ocean acidification on coral reef ecosystems. These hydrothermal sites are limited across the world's oceans and afford a unique way to study coral reef community adaptation and viability which cannot be duplicated by traditional laboratory microcosm or mesocosm experiments. Maug is a ring of 3 islands with a 200-m deep central caldera with a highly diverse coral community along the inner caldera and the outer fore reef shorelines. Shallow gas/hydrothermal vents along the inner shoreline of Maug's East island affect the water chemistry surrounding the coral reef communities of the caldera and have a significant local impact on corals. This talk will provide an overview of Maug and focus on the chemistry of the vents and their local impacts Closed captioning provided.

About the Speaker: David Butterfield has a bachelor's degree in Chemistry and German from Portland State University, and PhD in Chemical Oceanography from the University of Washington. After a National Research Council Post-Doc at PMEL, he started working in the Joint Institute for the Study of the Atmosphere and Ocean in 1993, where he is now Principal Research Scientist. His scientific interests center on the chemistry of hydrothermal vents and their impact on ocean chemistry and marine ecosystems. One of his specialties has been the development of instrumentation for coordinated chemical and microbiological sampling of hydrothermal fluids. He has worked on a wide range of deep-sea hydrothermal systems ranging from the carbonate chimneys of Lost City on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge to actively erupting volcanoes NW Rota and West Mata in the volcanic arcs of the western Pacific. He is engaged in deep-sea cabled observatory work in the NE Pacific. The May 2014 expedition to Maug was his first research cruise that did not involve a submersible. See website: http://www.pmel.noaa.gov/vents/index.html

Note: This seminar is sponsored by the Office of Ocean Exploration.

Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


Does the driest part of the Sahara Desert have a rainy season?

Date: Thursday, October 30, 2014 at 12:00pm EDT

Speaker: Owen Kelly, Research Scientist, NASA Goddard and George Mason University

Abstract: Within the Sahara Desert, there is a large region that receives less than 5 millimeters (0.2 inches) of rain a year on average, which makes this region one of the driest on Earth. Among the challenges to studying the climate of this region is that, in an area almost as large as the southeast United States, there are only four rain-gauge stations and no weather radars. Understandably, there has been a lack of consensus about the existence of any seasonal rainfall patterns here. This talk will present evidence for multiple rainy seasons in this extremely dry part of the Sahara Desert using 15-years of observations by the TRMM satellite, which was built by NASA and by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA). In particular, the TRMM satellite's precipitation radar and lightning sensor are used in this study. To validate seasonal patterns observed with TRMM, various African rain-gauge datasets were obtained from the NCDC, WMO, UCAR, and NOAA Central Library. Climate forecast models disagree about even the sign of the expected change in Saharan rainfall over the next century. Conceivably, improved documentation of current climate may facilitate an increase in consensus among climate forecasts.

Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


NOAA Evaluation Training and Capacity Building Seminar Series

Date: Thursday, November 6, 2014 at 12:00pm EDT

Speaker: TBD

Abstract: TBD

This seminar is sponsored by the NOAA Evaluation Training and Capacity Building Work Group

Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


Citizen Science Seminar

Date: Wednesday, November 12, 2014 at 12:00pm EDT

Speaker: TBD

Abstract: TBD

Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


Brown Bag Seminar

Date: Thursday, November 20, 2014 at 12:00pm EST

Speaker: TBD

Abstract: TBD

Note: This seminar is part of the 2014 Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar series.

Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


Brown Bag Seminar

Date: Thursday, December 18, 2014 at 12:00pm EST

Speaker: TBD

Abstract: TBD

Note: This seminar is part of the 2014 Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar series.

Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


Brown Bag Seminar

Date: Thursday, January 15, 2015 at 12:00pm EST

Speaker: TBD

Abstract: TBD

Note: This seminar is part of the 2014 Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar series.

Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


 

Additional seminars are scheduled through the OneNOAA Science Discussion Seminar Series

 

  Last modified:    Tue, 14-Oct-2014 20:23 UTC Library.Reference@noaa.gov
 
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