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Archives Brown Bag Seminars


1994-1997 | 1998-1999 | 2000 | 2001 | 2002 | 2003 |  2004 |  2005 | 2006 | 2007 |  2008 | 2009 | 2010 | 2011 | 2012 | 2013 | 2014 | Upcoming Brown Bags    For questions concerning this page please contact Library.Reference@noaa.gov.

The NOAA Central Library has hosted over 274 lunchtime "Brown Bag" seminars since 1994. This page lists all Brown Bags given. Powerpoint presentations and live recordings of the seminars will be added when available. Most presentations are in pdf format and require the free Acrobat Reader to view, while the live recordings are in wrf format and require the free WebEx Player to view. If you are interested in presenting a Brown Bag seminar, please contact Library.Reference@noaa.gov.

1994-1997 Brown Bags

  • 07/14/94 - "Implementing the National Spatial Data Infrastructure," Millington Lockwood, NOS
  • 09/13/94 - "Encore Presentation: Implementing the National Spatial Data Infrastructure," Millington Lockwood, NOS
  • 10/11/94 - "Natural and Anthropogenic Events Impacting Florida Bay: 1910-1994 Time Line," Adriana Cantillo, ORCA
  • 01/24/95 - "Internet, Gophers, and the World Wide Web," Patrick Stingley, NWS
  • 02/28/95 - "Efforts to Access GIS Through Libraries," Marilyn Lutz, University of Maine
  • 09/20/95 - "Unique and Historical Material at the NOAA Central Library - Part 1," Skip Theberge, NOS
  • 09/26/95 - "Unique and Historical Material at the NOAA Central Library - Part 2," Skip Theberge, NOS
  • 04/18/96 - "NOAA's Photo Library,"Carla Wallace, NOAA Central Library
  • 06/06/96 - "NODC's 35th Anniversary," Don Collins et al., NODC
  • 10/21-22/96 - "A Twister film presentation," comments by Joe Golden, OAR
  • 01/09/97 - "The Wreck of the Historical World War II Japanese Submarine I-52," Dave Jourdan and Jeff Burns, Meridian Sciences, Columbia, MD
  • 02/12/97 - "National Marine Sanctuaries Program 25th Anniversary; Outreach and Special Project," Stephanie Thornton, Sanctuaries and Reserves Division, Office of Ocean and Coastal Resource Management
  • 04/17/97 - A "To Fly" film presentation in honor of Kurt Stehling
  • 07/8/97 - "Global Oceanographic Data Research (GODAR) Project," Sydney Levitus, NODC
  • 08/19/97 - "Red Tides and the Federal ECOHAB Program," Kevin Sellner, Coastal Ocean Program
  • 10/02/97 - "Mapping the Ocean Floor from Space," Walter Smith, NODC Laboratory for Satellite Altimetry
  • 10/30/97 - "2000 and Beyond - A New Millennium of Disasters," Bill Hooke, OAR, U.S. National Weather Program
  • 12/04/97 - "Acid Rain: Science and Policy Issues," Michael Uhart, OAR
  • 12/18/97 - "Update on El Nińo: Getting Better or Getting Worse?" with John Kermond, Office of Global Programs

1998-1999 Brown Bags

  • 01/22/98 - "NOAA's Role in the TWA Flight 800 Investigation," Sam Debow, Office of Coast Survey
  • 02/05/98 - "Encore Presentation: NOAA's Role in the TWA Flight 800 Investigation," Sam Debow, Office of Coast Survey
  • 03/19/98 - "Salmon and the Endangered Species Act," Joseph Blum, National Marine Fisheries Service
  • 04/09/98 - "Women in Meteorology - A Global Perspective," Dian Gaffen, OAR
  • 04/21-23/98 - Open House for National Library Week (10 a.m. - 3 p.m.) Highlights: Tour Special Collections, Tips for desktop searches, Plot historical maps, Discover the weather on your day of birth
  • 06/16/98 - "NOAA's Role in the Development of the Civil Uses of the Global Positioning System (GPS) - Past, Present, and Future" by Dave Minkel, National Geodetic Survey
  • 07/30/98 - "The Dynamic Ocean - Tracking Ocean Surface Temperature Features Through Time, as Tracked by Satellite Sensing Systems," Richard Legeckis, NESDIS Office of Research and Applications
  • 08/27/98 - "Large Marine Ecosystems: Theory and Application," Ned Cyr, National Marine Fisheries Service
  • 10/01/98 - "Is the United States Arctic Contaminated?" by Jawed Hameedi, National Ocean Service
  • 01/15/99 - "Remote Sensing of Coral Reefs," Heather Holden, University of Waterloo
  • 02/23/99 - "Protecting Endangered Right Whales from Ship Strikes," Gregory Silber, Office of Protected Resources, NMFS
  • 03/25/99 - "The Environmental History of Biscayne Bay," Adriana Cantillo, National Ocean Service
  • 04/13/99 - "A Plan for Global Coral Reef Monitoring," Clive Wilkinson, Global Coral Reef Monitoring Network and Gregor Hodgson, Reef Check
  • 04/29/99 - "Climate Network Contributions to the Global Ocean Observing System Michael Johnson, Office of Global Programs
  • 05/20/99 - The Ecological History of the Potomac River Fisheries," James Cummins, Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin,~ Past President of the Potomac Chapter of American Fisheries Society
  • 06/08/99 - "Fellowship Programs of Japan's Science and Technology Agency," Katsuhisa Sagisaka, Deputy Director, Office for International Exchange Programs (STA) and Izumi Iketani, Chief Researcher, Division of International Affairs, Japan Science and Technology Corporation (JST)
  • 07/29/99 - "NEXRAD Project," Robert Saffle, National Weather Service
  • 08/05/99 - "May's Fury - Video Footage of the May 3, 1999 Oklahoma City Tornadoes," with comments by Joe Golden, OAR [This particular Brown Bag had at least five presentations over a 2-month period.]
  • 10/19/99 - "Prince William Sound - Ten Years After the Exxon Valdez Disaster," Jeep Rice and Ron Heintz, NMFS Auke Bay Laboratory
  • 11/04/99 - "Clouds, Rain, and Wonder," Hank Robinson, NWS
  • 11/18/99 - "Mapping Oyster Habitat in Chesapeake Bay," Gary Smith, Maryland Department of Natural Resources.
  • 12/16/99 - "Update on El Nińo- Getting Better or Worse?" John Kermond, Office of Global Programs.

2000 Brown Bags

  • 02/02/00 - "The History and Science of Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide; NOAA's Involvement," Dr. Lester Machta, former head of the Air Resources Laboratory
  • 02/24/00 - "Maximum Sustainable Yield Reborn," Dr. Pamela Mace, NMFS Woods Hole Laboratory
  • 03/09/00 - "Exploring Innerspace," Barbara Moore, Director of National Undersea Research Program
  • 03/23/00 - "My Stamp on History," Rear Admiral Evelyn Fields, Director of the Office of Marine and Aircraft Operations
  • 04/10/00 - "Alaska Predator Ecosystem Experiment and Findings," Bruce Wright of the NMFS Auke Bay Laboratory
  • 04/11/00 - "Ecological Impacts of the EXXON VALDEZ Oil Spill," NMFS Auke Bay Laboratory
  • 04/20/00 - "TIROS 40th Year Anniversary," Gregory Withee, Assistant Administrator for NESDIS
  • 05/25/00 - "NOAA's Program on Noise and the Effects on Marine Animals," Dr. Roger Gentry, NMFS Office of Protected Resources

  • 06/29/00 - "NOAA - Past, Present, and Future," Dr. D. James Baker, Administrator of NOAA

  • 07/12/00 - "Weather Satellites: History and Future for Operational Use and Climate Research," Dr. S. Fred Singer, first Director of the U. S. Weather Satellite Service

  • 08/31/00 - "OAR - Past, Present, and Future," Dr. David Evans, Assistant Administrator for the Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research

  • 09/26/00 - "Where the Detritus Hits the Alluvial Fan - The National Estuarine Research Reserves," Dr. David Niebuhr of the Chesapeake Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve.

  • 10/26/00 - "Selling and Transforming Time," Dr. Ian Bartky (formerly of the National Bureau of Standards)

  • 11/14/00 - "Adventures Under the Ozone Hole," Dr. Susan Solomon, OAR Aeronomy Laboratory

  • 11/30/00 - "Review of East Coast Winter Storms," Dr. Louis Uccellini, National Centers for Environmental Prediction

  • 12/07/00 - "Warming of the World Ocean," by Syd Levitus, Ocean Climate Laboratory, NODC

  • 12/19/00 - "Nino, Nina, and NAO - The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly," John Kermond, Office of Global Programs

2001 Brown Bags

  • 01/09/01 - "NWS - How We Serve the Nation," General Jack Kelly, Assistant Administrator for Weather Services and Director of the National Weather Service

  • 03/13/01 - "The Future of NOAA - A Vision for the Twenty-First Century," Scott Gudes, Acting Administrator of NOAA

  • 03/28/01 - "Horseshoe Crab Conservation Efforts," Dr. Carl Shuster, Jr., et al., Virginia Institute of Marine Science

  • 04/10/01 - "The GLOBE Program: Environmental Science and Education for K-12 Students Worldwide at Over 10,1000 Schools in 96 Countries, Sponsored by NOAA, NASA, and EPA," Tom Pyke, Chief CIO, Director HPCC, and Head of the GLOBE Program

  • 04/13/01 - "Declining Sea Otters and Ecosystem Changes in Alaska," Dr. James Estes, United States Geological Survey and University of California at Santa Cruz

  • 04/19/01 - "Ocean Exploration in NOAA," Commander Craig McLean, Director of the Office of Ocean Exploration Michael Kelly, Deputy Director of the Office of Ocean Exploration

  • 05/03/01 - "Environmental Satellite Remote Sensing of Snow Cover," Bruce Ramsay, NESDIS ORA

  • 05/17/01 - "Our Positioning History," Charlie Challstrom, NOS NGS

  • 05/30/01 - "Federal ECOHAB Program," Kevin Sellner, NOS, CSCOR

  • 06/12/01 - "NOAA's Ocean Exploration Heritage," Skip Theberge, NESDIS, Library

  • 06/28/01 - "Interactions among Systematics, Fisheries Agencies, and Marine Biodiversity," Dr. Michael Vecchione, Director NMFS National Systematics Laboratory

  • 08/02/01 - "The Importance of Seaweed Aquaculture," Dr. Charles Yarish of the University of Connecticut at Stamford.

  • 09/18/01 - "Socioeconomic Costs and Benefits of Marine Protected Areas," Betsy Nicholson of the NOS Coastal Ocean Program.

  • 09/28/01 - "Estuary Live an Internet Presentation," the NOS National Estuarine Research Reserves

  • 11/01/01 - "GIS Applications to Support Fishery Management," David Ball of the Marine and Freshwater Resources Institute of the Australian State of Victoria

  • 11/28/01 - "Ocean Science Programs of the National Science Foundation," Dr. Alexander Shor of the National Science Foundation

  • 12/14/01 - "Overview of the Ocean Exploration 2001 Expedition Season," Captain Craig McLean, Director of the Office of Ocean Exploration

  • 12/18/01 - "AOGP, Education, and the World Wide Web," Dr. John Kermond of the Office of Global Programs

2002 Brown Bags

  • 01/24/02 - "The Race to Save the Monitor," Dr. John Broadwater, Manager of the Monitor National Marine Sanctuary.

  • 02/07/02 - "Weather and the Olympic Winter Games," Dr. John Kelley of the NOS Office of Coast Survey, Coast Survey Development Laboratory.

  • 03/28/02 - "Climate Services in the U.S.: Some Historical Perspectives," Dr. Bob Reeves of the National Weather Service

  • 04/11/02 - "Problems in Paradise--Water Quality and Coral Reef Health on the Caribbean Island of Tobago," Dr. Robert Reeves of the Buccoo Reef Trust.

  • 04/16/02 - "Tampa Bay Bathy/Topo Project," by Robby Wilson of the Office of Coast Survey.

  • 05/02/02 - "The Ocean Biogeographic Information System (OBIS)," Dr. Fred Grassle of Rutgers University.

  • 05/16/02 - "Arctic Ice," Dr. Konstantin Vinnikov of the University of Maryland

  • 05/23/02 - "Art, Adventure, and Discovery Down Under," a discussion of scientific exploration and discovery in the Antarctic, Dr. Michael Van Woert of the National Ice Center

  • 05/29/02 - "Going ... Going... Gone? Earth's Melting Tropical Glaciers", Bob Leffler, NWS Climate Services Division

  • 06/05/02 - "Climate Controls on Sedimentation and Stratigraphy," Dr. Terry Edgar of the USGS

  • 06/19/02 - "The Black Sea Oceanographic Observing System," Dr. Alexander Suvorov of the Marine Hydrophysical Institute of the Ukrainian Academy of Sciences

  • 06/20/02 - "The North American Monsoon," Dr. Wayne Wiggins, Principal Climate Scientist of the Center for Climate Prediction and of NCEP

  • 08/29/02 - "Sound Velocity Fluctuations and their Effect on Multibeam Echosounder Surveys," Mr. Jorgen Eeg of the Royal Danish Administration of Navigation and Hydrography

  • 09/12/02 - "Can We Make Essential Fish Habitat Both Ecologically Meaningful and a Useful Management Tool," Dr. Peter Auster of the University of Connecticut

  • 09/19/02 - "ARGO -- the Global Array of Profiling Floats," Dr. Stan Wilson, Senior Scientist of NESDIS

  • 09/25/02 - "Innovations in Aquaculture," Dr. Jim McVey of NOAA Research Sea Grant

  • 10/10/02 - "The First Shot of the WWII Pacific Theater: The Role of the Japanese Imperial Navy's Midget Submarine," Al Kalvaitis of the NOAA Research National Undersea Research Program

  • 10/17/02 - "IQ (Information Quality) Guidelines, a discussion of the "Data Quality Act," Carla Steinborn of the Office of the Chief Information Officer and Dr. Bonnie Ponwith of the National Marine Fisheries Service.

  • 11/1/02 - "The Rapid Environmental Assessment Programme at the NATO SACLANT Undersea Research Centre," Dr. Bob Tyce, Oceanography Department Head, at the NATO SACLANT Undersea Research Centre at La Spezia, Italy

  • 11/8/02 - "Ecological Forecasting: Definitions, Examples, and Prospects," Dr. Don Scavia, Chief Scientist of the National Ocean Service

  • 11/13/02 - "Meteo-Management of the Steve Fossett Around-the-World Balloon Flight," Dr. David Dehenauw of the Royal Meteorological Institute of Belgium

  • 11/21/02 - "Biogeoinformatics of Corals, Sea Anemones, and Their Allies," Dr. Daphne Fautin, Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and Curator of the Natural History Museum and Biodiversity Research Center at the University of Kansas

  • 12/04/02 - "Capabilities of the NOAA Fish LIDAR," Dr. James Churnside of the NOAA Environmental Technology Laboratory

  • 12/05/02 - "Ocean Exploration 2002," Captain Craig Mclean, Director of the NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration

  • 12/17/02 - "EPIC/TAS/NOAA/NSF -- Acronym Soup that Equals High Adventure," Dr. John Kermond of the Office of Global Programs

2003 Brown Bags

  • 09/25/03 - "The Greatest Untold Story in America: The Rich Life and Tragic Death of Louisiana's Cajun Coast," Mike Tidwell
  • 01/09/03 - "Tides and Their Effect on Some Events in History," Dr. Bruce Parker, Director of the Coast Survey Development Laboratory

  • 01/29/03 - "Environmental Distance Learning," David Conrod of Conrod Communications Associates, a NOAA Fisheries Habitat Restoration Partner

  • 02/06/03 - "Strike a Chord with Admiral Lautenbacher," Vice Admiral Conrad Lautenbacher, Administrator of NOAA

  • 03/06/03 - Women's History Month seminar - " "Women in Cold War Oceanography: a Personal Perspective," Dr. Kathy Crane of the NOAA Arctic Research Office, as presented in her recent book, Sea Legs.

  • 03/19/03 - "JASON XIV: From Shore to Sea," a visual journey through this year's JASON Project featuring the Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary and Channel Islands National Park," Claire Johnson of the Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary

  • 03/20/03 - "The Grounding of the QUEEN ELIZABETH II and How It Changed Hydrography," Captain Nick Perugini, Chief of the Nautical Chart Division of the Office of Coast Survey

  • 04/03/03 - "Arctic Exploration Today," Dr. Kathy Crane of the NOAA Arctic Program Office

  • 04/23/03 - "Jaguars, Pumas, Prey Base, and Cattle Ranching in the Llanos Altos of Venezuela: Implications for Conservation," Dr. Michael Polisar of the United States Department of State

  • 05/08/03 - "Disaster - American Style," Dr. Bill Hooke, Director of Atmospheric Policy Program and Senior Policy Fellow of the American Meteorological Society
  • 05/12/03 - "Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority Representative Areas Program (RAP)," George Baldwin of the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority of Australia
  • 05/13/03 - "Monitoring Climate Change with an Arctic Seabird: The Response of Black Guillemots to a Warming Climate in Northern Alaska," Dr. George Divoky.of the University of Alaska, Fairbanks
  • 05/22/03 - "What's Culture Got To Do With It? Blue Crab Research and Management in the Chesapeake Bay," Dr. Michael Paolisso of the University of Maryland Anthropology Department
  • 06/03/03 - "A Land on Fire," James Fahn of the Ford Foundation
  • 06/05/03 - "Women in Meteorology - An Update," Mary Glackin, NOAA Assistant Administrator for Policy, Planning, and Integration
  • 06/26/03 - "Seaweed Aquaculture," Dr. C. H. Sohn of South Korea and of the University of Connecticut
  • 07/22/03 - "The Role of Nearshore Ecosystems as Fish and Shellfish Nurseries," Dr. Michael W. Beck of UC Santa Cruz and Michael P. Weinstein of the New Jersey Marine Sciences Consortium
  • 09/25/03 - "The Rich Life and Tragic Death of Louisiana's Cajun Coast," author Mike Tidwell
  • 10/02/03 - "Blue Frontier/Saving America's Living Seas," author David Helvarg
  • 10/07/03 - "Scuba-diving in the Barents Sea - The Invasion of the King Crab,s" Dr. Aleksey Zuyev of the Murmansk Marine Biological Institute and visiting scientist at NODC
  • 10/14/03 - "The New Frontier for Aquaculture in New England: Offshore Farming of Finfish and Shellfish with Museel Tasting Session," Dr. Richard Langan, University of New Hampshire
  • 11/06/03 - "Climate - A NOAA-Centric Tour," Dr. Dave Goodrich of the NOAA Climate Office
  • 11/13/03 - "Exploring Alaskan Seamounts with the Submersible Alvin" by Dr. Brad Stevens of the NOAA Fisheries Kodiak Laboratory
  • 11/20/03 - "The Hunt for the Alligator - the Union Navy's First Submarine," Catherine Marzine of the Office of National Marine Sanctuaries and Lt.(j.g.) Jeremy Weirich of the Office of Ocean Exploration
  • 12/03/03 - "The United Nations Atlas of the Oceans," Dr. Frances Michaelis of NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, and the Australia Department of Sustained Fisheries
  • 12/04/03 - "Adventure at Sea - Experiences on the NOAA Ship KA'IMIMOANA," Dr. John Kermond of the Office of Global Programs. Pre-seminar holiday music was provided by Aurelie Shapiro and Nikki Case of NOS.

2004 Brown Bags

  • 01/06/04 - "The GhostNet Project: A High-seas Search for Derelict Fishing Nets," Dr. Jim Churnside of the OAR Environmental Technology Laboratory
  • 01/23/04 - "Earth Observation Summit and the Work of the Group on Earth Observations," NESDIS Assistant Administrator Greg Withee
  • 01/13/04 - "Climate and Society - Linking the Past to the Future," Dr. Ants Leetma, Director of the OAR Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory
  • 03/03/04 - "The NWS Telecommunications Gateway," Fred Branski of the National Weather Service (NWS)
  • 03/05/04 -"Climate and the Environment," Dr. Philip Reid, Director of the Sir Alistair Hardy Foundation for Ocean Science in Plymouth, United Kingdom (View the Powerpoint Slides)
  • 03/10/04 - "Sea Grant meeting NOAA's needs: A Case Study of Fisheries Technology Transfer," Gary Graham, from NOAA's Texas Sea Grant program
  • 03/25/04 - "CMORPH: A New High-resolution Global Precipitation Analysis System," Dr. John Janowiak of NCEP
  • 04/13/04 - "Weird deep-sea squids and the nature of Natural History," Michael Vecchione of the NMFS Systematics Laboratory
  • 04/14/04 - "Rescue at Sea: The American Experience," a video presented by Christopher D. Parris, a Telecommunciations Specialist in the National Weather Service
  • 05/06/04 - "Global Sea Level Rise: The past decade versus the past 100 years", Dr. Laury Miller of the NESDIS Satellite Altimetry Laboratory
  • 05/13/04 - "NOAA participation and cooperation in the development of the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History Hall of the Oceans," Captain Craig McLean, Director, Office of Ocean Exploration
  • 05/14/04 - "Highlights of the April 2004 Submarine Ring of Fire Expedition to the Mariana Arc Submarine Volcanoes - Sulfurous Pits, CO2 Vents and Chemosynthetic Life in the Upper Ocean," Dr. Robert Embley of NOAA's Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL) and Chief Scientist of the Pacific Ring of Fire Expedition
  • 05/10/04 - "The Alaska Earthquake Tsunami," a video highlighting the Alaska Good Friday Earthquake of March 27, 1964, with Kurt Byers, from NOAA's Alaska Sea Grant programli>

  • 06/03/04 - "World War II Contributions of the United States Coast and Geodetic Survey," Dr. John Cloud, historian associated with the NOAA Central Library, in honor of the 60th Anniversary of D-Day, discussed This presentation was accompanied by a Library display of World War II documents published by the Coast and Geodetic Survey and the Weather Bureau.
  • 06/07/04 - Marine parameter data dictionaries, an important element of accessibility between holdings of multidisciplinary oceanographic data," Roy Lowery of the British Oceanographic Data Center
  • 06/16/04 - "Rip Current Education, Awareness, and Forecasting: A NOAA partnership," Dr. Wendy Carey, Coastal Processes Specialist with NOAA's Delaware Sea Grant Program
  • 06/18/04 - "The Bifurcation of the North Pacific Equatorial Current and its Significance in Climate," Dr. Tangdong Qu of the International Pacific Research Center, University of Hawaii
  • 06/30/04 - "Late Summer Chlorophyll Blooms in the Oligotrophic North Pacific Subtropical Gyre," Dr. Cara Wilson of the Pacific Fisheries Environmental Laboratory
  • 07/09/04 - "Studying the Coelacanth - A Microbiologist's Adventures with Old Four-Legs," Dr. Rosemary Dorrington of Rhodes University, Union of South Africa
  • 08/03/04 -"A Celtic Shark in the Making," a seminar on marine science research and advances in Ireland and the European Union in general, with Dr. Peter Heffernan of the Marine Institute at Galway, Ireland
  • 09/17/04 - "The activities of the Korean Oceanographic Data Center," Dr. Seung Heo of the Korean Oceanographic Data Center and the West Sea Fisheries Institute
  • 09/30/04 - "U.S. Climate Change Science and Technology Programs," Dr. James Mahoney, Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere, NOAA Deputy Administrator, and the Director of the Climate Change Science Program

  • 10/14/04 - "Lessons from the Titantic," Lt. J.G. Weirich, a NOAA Corps officer working for NOAA’s Office of Ocean Exploration (OE) as the maritime archaeological program officer. He was a member of NOAA's June 2004 "Return to the Titanic" expedition. (View the Powerpoint Slides)
  • 10/19/04 - "Invasive Species in the Great Lakes," Dr. Phil Moy of the University of Wisconsin Sea Grant
  • 10/21/04 - "Bluefin Tuna Farming in the Mediterranean," Dr. John Dean of the University of South Carolina
  • 10/29/04 - A new seminar series, the NOAA Education Seminar Series, a partnership between the NOAA Education Council and the NOAA Central Library, was kicked-off with "Research and Education: Volcanoes, Exploration and Life" by Veronique Robigou, Director of the REVEL Project at the University of Washington.
  • Tuesday, November 2 - "An Ocean Apart", a sometimes irreverent look at how cultural differences between the United Kingdom and the United States affect our weather perceptions, with John Teather, former editor of the BBC Weather Centre, and Sir Bill Giles, formerly Senior Weatherman of the BBC
  • 11/04/04 -"NOAA and the Preserve America Initiative," Cheryl Oliver of the National Marine Sanctuary Program
  • 11/08/04 - "Meteorology, Oceanography and Polynesian Voyaging", accounts of long-distance Pacific voyaging in traditional craft using Polynesian navigation methods, with Bernard Kilonsky of the University of Hawaii
  • Wednesday, November 10 - "NOAA Homeland Security Activities," Commander Phil Kenul, Director of the NOAA Homeland Security Office
  • Wednesday, November 17 - "Greatest Hits of Lake Michigan Seamount Studies," Dr. Russell Cuhel of the University of Wisconsin at Madison
  • Thursday, November 18 - "The Global Ocean Observing System," Michael Johnson of NOAA's Office of Global Programs (OGP) discussed
  • 12/01/04 -"Revolution in Earth and Space Science Education," hosted by The NOAA Education Seminar Series, a partnership between the NOAA Education Council and the NOAA Central Library, with Dennis M. Bartels, President of TERC, and former director of the Center for Teaching and Learning (TERC) at the San Francisco Exploratorium, and Daniel Barstow, Director of TERC's Center for Earth and Space Science Education
  • 12/10/04 - "Above and Beyond," the Library Annual Holiday Brown Bag seminar and extravaganza, with Dr. John Kermond of NOAA's Office of Global Programs (OGP). Refreshments for all as well as door prizes for lucky Library patrons.

2005 Brown Bags

  • 01/07/05 - "North Pacific Climate Regimes and Ecosystem Productivity," Dr. Jeff Napp of NOAA Fisheries, Alaska Fisheries Science Center, and Dr. Phyllis Stabeno of NOAA Research, Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory
  • 01/12/05 - "Lighthouses Across America," Elinor Dewire, lighthouse expert, author, and educator
  • 01/27/05 - "Air Resources Laboratory Programs," Dr. Bruce Hicks, Director of the Air Resources Laboratory
  • 02/02/05 - "Natural Disasters in International Affairs: Formulating Reconstruction Planning in NOAA," Dr. Nikola Garber of NOAA Research
  • Discover the Treasures of NOAA's Ark during the First Annual NOAA Heritage Week, February 7-11, 2005, a week of exhibits and learning dedicated to celebrating NOAA's rich heritage in the NOAA Science Center in Silver Spring, 11 am-2 pm Monday - Thursday and 10am -4pm on Friday.
  • 02/09/05 - "NWS Forecast Office Operations over Time" John Jones, Deputy Assistant Administrator, NOAA Weather Service, in celebration of the First Annual NOAA Heritage Week (View the Powerpoint Slides)
  • 02/11/05 - RADM Sam DeBow, Director NOAA Corps, NOAA Marine and Aviation Operations, presented the evolution of survey technology over time and how modern survey technology helped them locate and map the wreck site of TWA flight 800.
  • 03/03/05 - Dr. Peter A. Rona, Professor of Marine Geology and Geophysics at the Institute of Marine and Coastal Sciences, Rutgers University, presented "Volcanoes of the Deep Sea: The Science Behind the IMAX Films." The film, and another IMAX film, "Aliens of the Deep," illuminate discoveries of hydrothermal vents and vent ecosystems in the deep ocean. You can check out Volcanoes of the Deep Sea from the NOAA Central Library.
  • 03/10/05 - Chet Arnold and Dave Dickson of the University of Connecticut presented "Helping Coastal Communities Balance Growth and Natural Resource Protection: NEMO, the NEMO Network and NOAA." The National NEMO Network is a network of education programs teaching local land use decision makers about the relationship between land use and natural resource protection. Chet Arnold is the Associate Director of the University of Connecticut Center for Land Use Education and Research, and a Water Quality Educator with UConn Department of Extension and Connecticut Sea Grant. Dave Dickson is the National NEMO Network Coordinator, and a Natural Resource Management Educator with UConn Department of Extension.
  • 03/17/05 - Dr. Jim Sanchirico of Resources for the Future presented ""No-take Zones as Optimal Fishery Management."
  • 04/07/05 - Dr. Jamie L. King of NOAA's Cheasapeake Bay Program Office presented "A New Oyster for Chesapeake Bay? Status of the Asian Oyster EIS and NOAA's Research Initiative." The talk focused on the Asian oyster C. ariakensis and the issues surrounding the possible introduction of this species into Chesapeake Bay. (View the Powerpoint Slides)
  • 04/14/05 - Dr. Thomas Chen of the University of Connecticut Department of Molecular and Cell Biology presented "Manipulation of Innate Immunity Genes for Enhancement of Resistance to Bacterial and Viral Pathogens in Finfish and Shellfish Aquaculture."
  • 04/21/05 - Roger L. Gentry, Ph.D., NOAA Office of Protected Resources, presented "How NOAA Helped Reveal the Lives of Diving Animals Through Instruments," an historical review of the evolution of instrumentation and marne mammals.
  • 05/12/05 - Dr. Wayne Coats of the Smithsonian Institution presented "Microbial Controls of Chesapeake Bay Phytoplankton."
  • 05/19/05 - Dr. Grier, Associate Professor in the Center for International Science and Technology Policy at George Washington University, presented "When Computers Were Human."
  • 06/02/05 - Dr. Spencer Weart of the American Institute of Physics Center for History of Physics presented "The Discovery of Global Warming." See also Dr. Weart's comprehensive history, The Discovery of Global Warming.
  • 06/09/05 - Vincent Mudrake, Director of the USFWS Warm Springs Regional Fisheries Center, Warm Springs, Georgia, presented "Recovering the Endangered Shortnose Sturgeon through Innovative Techniques and Interagency Partnerships."
  • 06/16/05 - John Frece of the National Center for Smart Growth Research and Education presented "Growth and Development on the Coast: What Does it Mean for You?" This was the first of a series of Seminars on Smart Growth.
  • 06/23/05 - "Movie Time", the Library presented "Volcanoes of the Deep Sea", originally an IMAX movie, and a historic look back at a major NOAA science program, "GATE:Global Atmospheric Research Program."

  • 06/26/05 - Dr Cicin-Sain, Director of the Gerard J. Mangone Center for Marine Policy at the University of Delaware, discussed the Center's Offshore Aquaculture Policy Framework project. More information on the work of the Center is available on the Internet at http://www.ocean.udel.edu/cmp.

  • 06/28/05 - John Bailey, Director of the Urban Institute's Smart Growth Institute, presented "Lessons from Reality Check and Success Stories from Around the Metropolitan DC Region”.

  • 08/10/05 - Dr. Rennie Holt, Director of the Antarctic Ecosystem Research Division at NOAA Fisheries’ Southwest Fisheries Science Center, discussed "Antarctica: The Last Great Place on Earth, NOAA Fisheries' Role in Preserving its Marine Living Resources: The U.S. Antarctic Marine Living Resources Program."

  • 09/15/05 - Mel Tull and Gary Stith, both from the Montgomery County Silver Spring Redevelopment Office, discused the revitalization of Silver Spring. This was the third Smart Growth Seminar.
  • 09/20/05 - Susan Carlson, director of Environmentors, introduced NOAA staff to EnvironMentors and the opportunity to serve as a mentor. Mentors work with a D.C. high school student and teacher on developing environmental science projects over the academic year.
  • 09/21/05 - Stephanie Showalter, Director of the National Sea Grant Law Center, presented "An Overview of the Law Center's Services and Role in the Sea Grant Community as it Serves NOAA and the Nation." She will present the results of recent Law Center research efforts and encourage dialogue between Law Center staff and NOAA attorneys.
  • 10/1/05 - Kristen M. Fletcher, Roger Williams University School of Law, and Paul C. Ticco, Coastal States Organization, presented "Kelo v. New London: Implications for Coastal Management."
  • 10/18/05 - Members of the NOAA Mediators Cadre, NOAA Alternative Dispute Resolution Program, presented "Have your work relationships run aground?" Ever wondered how to resolve your differences at work easily? Hear how your NOAA Alternative Dispute Resolution Program works and watch a mediation.

  • 10/20/05 - David Kuykendall of Montgomery County's Department of Permitting Services presented "Water quality issues in downtown Silver Spring redevelopment project." This was the 3rd seminar in the joint NOAA/EPA Smart Growth Seminar Series.
  • 10/19/05 - Dr. Franklin Schwing, NMFS Southwest Fisheries Science Center, presented "Climate Variability in the California Current Ecosystem: Implications for Marine Populations."
  • 11/19/05 - The fourth seminar in our series of Seminars on Smart Growth featured Tom Gallas from TortiGallas, presenting "Working to build better places: Bringing the public and private sectors together."

  • 12/01/05 - Tundi Agardy, member of the federal advisory committee on Marine Protected Areas, presented "MPA Networks: Are They Important? More Importantly, Are They Feasible?" Dr. Agardy presented her views on what constitutes a regional network of Marine Protected Areas, and why such large scale networks are a crucial step in moving towards more effective, ecosystem-based management. She will also speak to the growing interest in ocean zoning, and how MPA networks form a logical basis for zoning plans. Finally, she addressed feasibility and whether the world is ready for such ambitious marine protection. (View the Powerpoint Slides)

  • 12/08/05 - Peter Leigh, of NOAA's Office of Habitat Conservation, presented "The ecological crisis, the human condition, and community-based restoration as an instrument for its cure." The full-text of Peter's paper on this topic is available online: http://www.int-res.com/articles/esep/2005/E60.pdf.

  • 12/12/05 - Dr. Tony Ribbink, Director, African Coelacanth Ecosystem Programme, South African Institute for Aquatic Biodiversity, presented "The African Coelacanth Ecosystem Programme: Biodiversity and Biomass."

  • 12/15/05 - The 4th in our series of NOAA/EPA Smart Growth and Coastal Communities Speaker Series will featured Lynn Richards from EPA's Development, Community & Environment Division. Ms. Richards discussed the environmental benefits of smart growth development practices. The talk will cover many of the air and water quality issues that result from conventional development practices and how smart growth approaches can help lead to better environmental outcomes.

  • 12/21/05- Dr. John Kermond presented the traditional Library Holiday Seminar. This was the eighth installment of giveaways, quizzes, and great information concerning climate, global programs, and Teacher at Sea.

2006 Brown Bags

  • 01/26/06 - Lt. Jeff Shoup, NOAA Corps, presented "SARSAT 101," a discussion of NOAA's Search and Rescue Satellite communication system.
  • 02/07/06 12:00 – 1:30 pm in the NOAA Science Center SSMC#4 - Dave Alberg, Hans Van Tilburg, and Dede Marx presented "Maritime Heritage in NOAA’s National Marine Sanctuaries". (presented as part of NOAA Heritage Week.)

  • 02/08/06 12:00 – 1:30 pm in the NOAA Science Center SSMC#4 - Taylor Morrison, author and artist of "The Coast Mappers" presented: "Bringing NOAA's History to Life Through the Art of the Picture Book." (presented as part of NOAA Heritage Week.)

  • 03/06/06 - Steve Reilly, Director, Protected Resources Division, and Lisa Ballance, leader of the Ecosystems Studies Group, both of the NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center, discussed "Protected Species Ecosystem Approaches to Management."

  • 03/1306 - The Czech Hydrometeorological Institute And Flood Warning Services In The Czech Republic" by Jan Danhelka, Milan Salek, Tomas Vlasak of the Czech Hydrometeorological Institute (Prague – Brno - Ceske Budejovice).
  • 03/14/06 - Ed Melvin, Marine Fisheries Specialist from the Washington Sea Grant Program, presented "Reducing Seabird Bycatch in the Bering Sea and Gulf of Alaska Longline Fisheries."
  • 03/16/06 - Dr. John Cloud, historian at the NOAA Central Library presented "Oceanography between the wars: The Coast and Geodetic Survey and the contested discovery of the deep sound channel in the ocean." This was be presented as part of the prestigious Historical Seminar on Contemporary Science and Technology series at the National Air and Space Museum.
  • 03/28/06 - Barbara A. Block, of the Tuna Research and Conservation Center of Stanford University, presented "Electronic Tags Reveal the Migrations, Behaviors and Population Structure of Northern Bluefin Tuna in the Atlantic and Pacific Ocean" by Dr. Barbara Block of the Tuna Research and Conservation Center of Stanford University.

  • 03/30/06 - Timothy Keeney, Deputy Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere, presented "Ocean and atmospheric observations and NOAA's relevance". The powerpoint slides for this presentation are available at http://www.pco.noaa.gov/presentation.htm. This was a joint NODC/NOAA Central Library seminar to be presented at the NOAA Central Library.

  • 04/04/06 - Dr. Timothy Essington of the University of Washington and Dr. David Conover of Stony Brook University, New York, presented "The Unforeseen Ecosystem and Evolutionary Impacts of Fishing: Applying Lessons Learned to Magnuson Reauthorization." Note: This seminar will be from 10:00 - 11:00 am.
    Abstract: New findings in fisheries science are revealing unexpected consequences of fishing. These include simultaneous depletion of many species within the same ecosystem (risking ecosystem collapse) and rapid evolution of heavily fished species towards smaller, less fit individuals. By targeting the biggest fishes and removing them from the breeding population, ‘human selection’ is affecting the productivity of commercial fisheries. Fifty years ago the mean length of cod in the Gulf of Maine was 32 inches – today the mean length is only 12 inches. The impending reauthorization of the Magnuson-Stevens Act is a critical opportunity to incorporate what science now teaches us into a new ecosystem approach to fisheries management. Dr. Essington and Dr. Conover, scientists at the forefront of evolutionary biology and fisheries ecology, will present their recent research and discuss its implications for fisheries management.

  • 04/10/06 - Captain Albert Theberge (Skip) of the NOAA Central Library, presented "NOAA: 200 Years of Science and Service." (View the Powerpoint slides in pdf format)

  • 04/13/06 - Dr. Richard W. Spinrad, Assistant Administrator of NOAA Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR), presented "Contribution of NOAA to the U.S. and International Global Ocean Observing System (GOOS)".
  • 05/04/2006 - Dr. David Pawson, a Senior Research Scientist at the Smithsonian Institution Museum of Natural History presented a NOAA Heritage Seminar "Austin Hobart Clark, Naturalist on the “Albatross” in 1906 and Smithsonian Curator 1908-1950: here’s a guy who put NOAA and the Smithsonian on the map in more ways than one!"
  • 05/09/2006 - Roy Mendelssohn, Supervisory Operations Research Analyst at NOAA Fisheries, SWFSC, Environmental Research Division, Pacific Grove (http://www.pfeg.noaa.gov), presented "A Reanalysis of North Pacific Sea Surface Temperatures Using State-Space Techniques: The PDO Redefined." The first part of the talk will be a non-technical overview of the state-space related methodologies that are used to analyze oceanographic and atmospheric series, and a discussion of some of the issues in accurately identifying shifts or non-stationarities in time series. In the second part of the talk, the speaker will present a reanalysis of the North Pacific sea surface temperatures (SST) used in estimating the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) using a combination of state-space decomposition and subspace identification techniques.
  • 05/11/2006 - Dr. Carlos Cotlier, Director, Remote Sensing Center, National University of Rosario, Argentina (www.fceia.unr.edu.ar/csr), presented a seminar "Comparative Research Between NOAA and Feng Yun Satellite Images for Determining the Capabilities of Land covers Studies with aid of SAC-C (Argentina) and Landsat 5 TM USA Images-Study Area: Salado River Source."
  • 05/22/2006 - In honor of National Maritime Day, 5 high school students from the Ballard Maritime Academy at Ballard High School in Washington state discussed NOAA's role in supporting the academy, how students have benefited from the program, and an overview of the academy's curriculum and history. NOAA awards a grant each year to the academy to fund curriculum development and a trip to Washington, D.C. for 5 Ballard students and 2 teachers.
  • 06/06/06 - Christine Keiner, Associate Professor of Science, Technology and Society, Rochester Institute of Technology, presented ""Debating the Deliberate Introduction of Non-Native Oysters to the Chesapeake Bay: A Historical Analysis"."
  • 06/28/06 - A presentation was made by Theodoris Corbett, program manager of the Presidential Management Fellows (PMF) Program. This will be the first of three presentations on this important program.
  • 07/06/06 - Dr. Dale Haidvogel, Professor of Marine and Coastal Sciences, Rutgers University, presented "Global Drivers, Local Impacts: New Models and Methods in Support of Ecosystem-based Management".
    Abstract: The last decade has seen an unprecedented improvement in our ability to observe, to model and to understand the global ocean circulation and its accompanying chemical, biological and geological systems. Here we review recent progress in understanding the effects of global climate variability on regional ecosystems dynamics, with a particular focus on the legacy of the US GLOBEC program. In particular, we note the evolution and successful deployment of end-to-end systems for high-resolution coupled studies of regional climate impacts. Illustrations are drawn from the US East and West Coasts, and the Bering Sea. New approaches to, and opportunities for, ecosystems-based management are highlighted.

  • 07/13/06 - Scott Rayder, NOAA Chief of Staff, presented a seminar on NOAA's Vision and Future. (View the Powerpoint slides) This was a joint NODC/NOAA Central Library seminar.
  • 07/27/06 - Naomi Oreskes, Ph.D., History Department & Program in Science Studies, University of California, San Diego, presented "Consensus in Science: How Do We Know We're Not Wrong?" Dr. Oreskes gave this talk at the 2004 AAAS Sarton Memorial Lecture.

  • 07/27/06 - 08/23/06 - Karen Kohanowich, Deputy Director of NOAA's National Undersea Research Program, spoke about her week-long adventures with NASA astronauts on board the Aquarius, the NOAA underwater sea lab based off the coast of Florida in the Florida Keys Marine Sanctuary. Karen and the NASA astronauts conducted center of gravity tests to determine optimal weights for spacesuits for fights to the Moon and Mars. The tests were conducted as part of a NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations (NeeMO) expedition. (View the Powerpoint slides)

  • 09/20/06 - Lee Larkin and Vicki Clark of the Virginia Institute of Marine Science (VIMS) have developed a new NOAA collection of education products on the Bridge, an online Sea Grant Ocean Sciences Education Center. "Helping to BRIDGE the Gap between NOAA Science and K-12 Education", presented a discussion of their work in setting up this online database of NOAA education products.

  • 10/12/06 - John Hessler of the Library of Congress discussed the Martin Waldseemuller Map. Acquired by the Library of Congress in 2003, "Waldseemuller's map supported Amerigo Vespucci's revolutionary concept of the New World as a separate continent, which, until then, was unknown to the Europeans. It was the first map, printed or manuscript, to depict the lands of a separate Western Hemisphere and with the Pacific as a separate ocean. The map reflected a huge leap forward in knowledge, recognizing the newly found American land mass and forever changing mankind's understanding and perception of the world itself."
  • 10/25/2006 - "Whatever happened to Terrestrial Magnetism?" was presented by Greg Good, historian of geophysics and geomagnetism at West Virginia University; Associate Editor, Geology and Geophysics journal

    Abstract:
    In 1900, researchers interested in Earth's magnetism generally proclaimed all facets of magnetic phenomena to be within their purview. Most researchers, including those at the Coast Survey and its successor agencies, called themselves 'magneticians' first and physicists or geologists second. From the time of the second superintendent of the Coast Survey, AD Bache, until the mid-20th century, Earth's magnetism was a major focus of Survey activity. After WW II, specialization both in the agency and outside it increased. Distinct magnetic research areas appeared: geodynamo theory and the study of the core-mantle boundary; palaeomagnetism and its growing connection to geology; and the magnetism of near space, among others. The earlier unity dissolved and Terrestrial Magnetism fragmented. The US government redistributed the activities of the old Coast Survey among ESSA, NOAA, the US Geological Survey, NASA, and other new players. Fragmentation — both institutional and conceptual — produced a loss of community and of memory. The 200th anniversary of the founding of the Coast Survey is an appropriate time to reflect on these large scale and complex changes.

  • 10/26/2006 "West Coast Marine Managed Areas: Trends in Place-Based Ocean Management" with Dr. Charles Wahle, Director, Science Institute, National Marine Protected Areas Center and Dr. Brian Jordan, Maritime Archaeologist, National Marine Protected Areas Center

    Abstract:
    Marine managed areas (MMAs) are special places in ocean, coastal and estuarine ecosystems where vital natural and cultural resources are given greater protection than in surrounding waters. Currently, there are more than 1,500 MMAs documented in U.S. marine waters and the Great Lakes, managed by hundreds of distinct federal, state and tribal authorities. This seminar will present information on MMAs in California, Oregon and Washington, where the National Marine Protected Areas Center is initiating a West Coast Pilot project with federal, state, and tribal partners to facilitate the use of area-based management as a tool for conserving important marine resources and support the development of a regionally-based national system of marine protected areas. Data will be presented on the number, area, type, and level of protection within MMAs nationally and on the West Coast. In addition, a subset of located historic and non-historic submerged shipwrecks and aircraft has been analyzed to identify the number of known cultural resources within and outside West Coast MMAs, and the degree to which cultural resources are protected by current MMAs authorities.

  • 11/02/06 - Doubleheader! Seminars at 12 noon AND 2 pm!

    12 noon: Sea Grant seminar: "Sea Grant Cooperative Efforts After Hurricanes Katrina and Rita"

    Presenters include:
    Mike Liffman, NOAA/Sea Grant - Louisiana Sea Grant Extension Leader
    Rusty Gaude, NOAA/Sea Grant - Louisiana Sea Grant Extension Fisheries agent
    Eric Olsson, NOAA/Sea Grant - Washington Sea Grant Marine Oil Spill Prevention specialist
    Wayne and Nancy Weikel - private citizens and FEMA volunteers

    Abstract:
    In the days and months that followed the devastation of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in the Gulf of Mexico region, NOAA Sea Grant was among the many NOAA partners that responded. As a national program, Sea Grant has the unique ability and university infrastructure to bring resources to bear from across the nation, and the post-hurricane response was no exception. This seminar will highlight Sea Grant's cooperative efforts in the Gulf and will touch on some of the numerous partnerships that made them possible, including work with FEMA and other agencies. One specific example that will be highlighted is the national effort that was led by Alaska Sea Grant, Washington Sea Grant, Louisiana Sea Grant, and private citizens to transport a ship travel lift from Alaska to the Gulf region.

  • 2 pm: "Studying Bahamian ecological and human seascapes to model networks of marine protected areas in coral reef ecosystems" discussion by Dr. Dan Brumbaugh, Senior Conservation Scientist at the American Museum of Natural History's Center for Biodiversity and Conservation (New York, NY). Sponsored by NOAA's Office of Education.

    Abstract:
    Little research to date has addressed how networks of ecologically-connected marine protected areas (MPAs) should be designed to function across realistic seascapes that include both natural and human dimensions. The Bahamas Biocomplexity Project (BBP; see http://bbp.amnh.org), a large collaborative project, was initiated to address this important need for integrated, interdisciplinary research in the context of recent management initiatives in The Bahamas. Drawing on approaches from oceanography, population genetics, ecology, anthropology, and economics, the BBP is integrating theory and data in statistical, analytical, and computational models about Bahamian coastal dynamics. Major areas of interest include the critical seascape dimensions for conservation planning and the crucial interactions and feedbacks among physical, biological, and social systems that can influence how marine protected areas (MPAs) and MPA  networks function. In The Bahamas, several lines of evidence, including variation in species-habitat relationships, population genetics, and sociopolitical considerations, suggest that primary conservation planning for coral reef ecosystems should occur at the scale of major islands. Data and models also suggest that MPA planning for biodiversity and fisheries objectives will benefit from greater consideration of the dynamic feedbacks that may result from the implementation of MPAs in ecological and human seascapes. This presentation provides an overview of certain BBP research objectives, approaches, and results about seascape structure and function and their significance for MPA planning across the Bahamian archipelago and, by extension, archipelagic coral reef ecosystems elsewhere.  The presentation will also highlight a few research and educational tools that have been produced by the AMNH and are available via the internet.

  • 11/16/06 - "Riding the World’s Biggest Wave: Stories of the Survival and Recovery of People and the Marine Environment from the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami" presented by Dwayne Meadows, Ph.D. Fishery Management Specialist, National Marine Fisheries Service, Office of Protected Resources

    Abstract:
    At the time of the 2004 tsunami Dwayne was a coral reef ecologist at the National Marine Fisheries Services’ Pacific Islands Fishery Science Center in Hawaii. After a three day SCUBA diving vacation trip, he stayed the night in Khao Lak, Thailand; the worst hit part of Thailand where 80% of the 10,000 deaths occurred. At the time of the tsunami he was in a bungalow 50 feet from the ocean. Our group of 1000 survivors was cut off from assistance for over one day. This presentation is the story of the survival and recovery of many heroic and inspirational people during those horrible those days. It is also the story of how the NOAA and professional medical and ecosystem restoration training he had was able to be used to aid the survivors and the country. After the tsunami Dwayne returned twice to Thailand to advise and assist in the process of marine debris removal from around sensitive coral reefs throughout Thailand, something he had experience with working for NOAA in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. Dwayne will also discuss work he assisted in to restore hard and soft corals in some marine parks.

  • 11/29/06 - "What Americans Really Think About Climate Change: Attitude Formation and Change in Response to a Raging Scientific Controversy," presented by Jon A. Krosnick, Professor in Humanities and Social Sciences, Stanford University. Many of Dr. Krosnick's publications can be viewed on his faculty website. Other articles:
    "American opinion on global warming: The impact of the Fall 1997 debate" appeared in the journal Public Understanding of Science, 2000, vol. 9, no. 3. Abstract is available for free.
    "The Origins and Consequences of democratic citizens' Policy Agendas: A Study of Popular Concern about Global Warming" appeared in the journal Climatic Change, July 2006, vol. 77, no. 1-2. Abstract is available for free.
  • Abstract:
    During the past decade, many scientific experts have been frustrated by the American public's apparent indifference to climate change and the threats it may pose. Just a few weeks ago, a headline on newspapers across the country proclaimed: "Scientists and the American Public Disagree Sharply Over Global Warming." Is it really true? Do Americans really not yet accept the opinions of scientific experts on climate change? In this presentation, Professor Jon Krosnick will present findings from a series of national surveys that he has designed and conducted since 1996, tracking what Americans do and do not believe on this issue and what they do and do not want to have done about it. The survey results are surprising in many ways.

  • Friday, December 8, 2006 - Library Holiday Extravaganza includes refreshments and the annual presentation by Jon Kermond of NOAA's Climate Office.
  • Wednesday, December 13, at 11:30 a.m. - Brigadier General D.L. Johnson, U.S. Air Force (Ret.), Assistant Administrator for Weather Services and Director, NOAA National Weather Service, will present "Services Evolution: Evolving the National Weather Service Concept of Operations" in the NOAA Auditorium. View the Powerpoint Slides (pdf;2MB)

    Abstract: Our Nation's needs for weather, water, and climate information are evolving. The post-9/11, post-Hurricane Katrina environment requires robust climate and environmental/health services and public awareness efforts to prepare for and respond to manmade and natural disasters.

    The NOAA National Weather Service (NWS) of the future must provide greater value by being a flexible and efficient service organization that gives local forecast offices the freedom to focus on high-impact events, collaborates with other NOAA components and external partners, increases IMET-type support for events beyond fire weather, and maximizes the value of new science and technology.

  • The NWS is in the process of prototyping three Services Evolution Initiatives that will position the agency for the future and may lead to fundamental changes in the way the agency operates. Join General Johnson in this brown bag session to learn about the exciting period of discovery the agency is currently undertaking.

  • Thursday, December 14 - Kimberly Davis and Mike Osmond of the World Wildlife Fund (WWF)will present "WWF's Smart Gear International Competition" in NOAA Central Library at 12 noon.

    Abstract: WWF 's International Smart Gear Competition, created in 2004, brings together the fishing industry, research institutes, universities, and government, to inspire and reward practical, innovative fishing gear designs that reduce bycatch -the accidental catch and related deaths of sea turtles, birds, marine mammals, cetaceans and nontarget fish species in fishing gear such as longlines and nets. This most pressing threat to marine life needs a wide-ranging, multidisciplinary response, and WWF believes the Smart Gear competition will help catalyze that response by encouraging creative thinkers everywhere to share their ideas. Applicants are asked to submit their ideas for modified fishing gears and procedures that increase selectivity for target fish species and reduce bycatch for other species. The competition is open to eligible entrants from any background and a diverse group responded in the first year, including gear technologists, fishermen, engineers, chemists, and inventors. More than 50 entries were received from 16 countries during the first year of the competition. These entries were judged by an international panel made up of gear technologists, fisheries experts, representatives of the seafood industry, fishermen, scientists, researchers and conservationists. The competition awards a $25,000 first prize and two $5,000 runner-up prizes for the best ideas.

2007 Brown Bags

  • Thursday, January 11, 2007 - Repeat Presentation! For those who missed this compelling eyewitness account of surviving the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami, Dr. Dwayne Meadows, NOAA NMFS Office of Protected Resources , will present "Riding the Worlds Biggest Wave: Stories of the Survival and Recovery of People and the Marine Environment from the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami."
  • Thursday, January 25, 2007 - Doctoral Student Joseph Bassi presented "How NOAA Got to Boulder", a discussion of the beginnings of the NOAA Boulder Laboratories.
  • Thursday, February 1, 2007 - Author and former NOAA employee Sandy Burke discussed her new book, "Let the River Run Silver Again", an account of the saving of the shad fishery on the Potomac River and a guidebook for citizen participation in helping the recovery of endangered fisheries. This seminar was co-sponsored by the NOAA Office of Education.
  • Monday, February 12, from 2:30 to 3:30 pm - Admiral Hector Soldi, Director of IMARPE in Lima, Peru (Peruvian Institute for Study of the Sea), presented a "The role of IMARPE in the management of the Peruvian Fisheries."

    Abstract: The ocean off the west coast of South America is notable because it produces more fish per unit area than any other region in the world oceans. However, this area is intimately linked to the ocean-atmosphere coupling over the tropical Pacific, and therefore subject to large year-to-year and decade-to-decade fluctuations in regional ocean climate. Operational fisheries management is the main role of IMARPE. This task is now evolving away from a monospecific to an "Ecosystem-Based" paradigm. This new approach appears to be particularly appropriate for the Humboldt or Peru Current System, where the uncertainty associated with high ocean variability and regime shifts represent major challenges for Ecology and Fisheries research. After many years of managing the main anchovy fisheries stocks in Peru, IMARPE has developed several tools using experience and existing models to manage this complex ocean ecosystem and its main fisheries. However, several conditions like the large fishing fleet and the impact of warm periods associated with El Nino in the anchovy stock are still important challenges in the management of the Peruvian Fisheries.

  • Wednesday, February 21, 2007 - Presentation by Nolan Doesken and Henry Reges, of the Community Collaborative Rain, Hail and Snow Network (CoCoRaHS). CoCoRaHS is a recipient of NOAA's Environmental Literacy Grants Program. This brown bag was sponsored by the NOAA Office of Education.

    Abstract: What do meteorologists, hydrologists, farmers, emergency managers, newspaper reporters, golfers and baseball players have in common? They all keep track of precipitation! Precipitation is one of the most important of all climate elements for daily life. Yet, precipitation varies tremendously from place to place and from month to month and year to year. These variations have widespread impacts. This seminar will describe a project where people of all ages, using very simple and low cost instruments, are helping scientists study storms and precipitation patterns. Volunteers provide valuable data for NOAA applications while learning directly about climate processes, impacts and research. Methods for measuring rain, hail and snow will be demonstrated, and CoCoRaHS results will be shown including precipitation patterns from recent storms.

  • Thursday, March 1, 2007 - Doria Grimes, NOAA Central Library, presented "George Washington Carver – Voluntary Weather Observer."

    Abstract: From Nov. 1899 through Jan. 1932, daily weather observations were submitted from Tuskegee, Alabama, on government Form 1009 as part of the Cooperative Observer Program. Most of these daily observations were handwritten and signed by George Washington Carver. How was he able to execute daily weather observations in conjunction with his teaching, travel, and research activities with peanuts, pecans, soybeans, fertilizers, cotton, etc? Did he labor as meticulously with this data as he did with his agricultural products? Not really! A review of correspondence to and from Carver and the U.S. Department of Agriculture Weather Bureau reveal interesting facets of his personality and accomplishments during this period. The Tuskegee weather observations have been imaged and are now available online at http://docs.lib.noaa.gov/rescue/gw_carver_tuskegee/data_rescue_tuskegee_observations.html.

  • Thursday, March 8, 2007 - Dr. Richard Langan, Director, University of New Hampshire Open Ocean Aquaculture Program, presented "Advancements in Open Ocean Aquaculture."

    Abstract: This presentation will review the current status, opportunities and challenges for further development of open ocean aquaculture in the U.S. Aquaculture development in the U.S. and worldwide is facing constraints on expansion in protected, near shore marine environments where sea conditions are favorable for surface-referenced culture. In some areas, the carrying capacity of embayments has been exceeded, while in others, concerns about environmental impacts, multiple use conflicts, and resistance by shorefront property owners has limited opportunities for growth. Moving culture operations to open ocean environments where more space is available and environmental impacts can be minimized has been proposed as a possible solution. While offshore waters offer ample opportunity for expansion, the high-energy environment of the open ocean presents significant technical and operational challenges, requiring new approaches to sea cage and shellfish farming. An additional factor for the U.S. is the recent federal government directive to implement ecosystem-based management. Therefore, in addition to overcoming the technical challenges, offshore aquaculture must be developed in a manner consistent with the goals of integrated coastal and ocean management.

  • Wednesday, May 2, 2007 - Helen Wood, NOAA's GEOSS Integration Manager, presented "What is GEOSS and Why Do We Care?" Powerpoint presentation (pdf; 2.2MB) to accompany talk.

    Abstract: GEOSS stands for the Global Earth Observation System of Systems. The intergovernmental Group on Earth Observations (GEO) is leading a worldwide effort to build a GEOSS. This is an activity that NOAA and the United States initiated in 2003. Its purpose is to provide comprehensive, coordinated Earth observations from thousands of instruments worldwide, transforming the data they collect into vital information for society.

  • Since then over 65 governments and more than 40 international organizations have joined the activity from around the World. Back home, the US has formed a national, interagency planning and coordination committee, the "USGEO", that reports to the President's National Science and Technology Council. NOAA Administrator Conrad Lautenbacher is the US co chair of GEO. In June 2005 he named Helen Wood as the NOAA GEOSS Integration Manager. Earlier she served as Director of the Secretariat for the intergovernmental Group on Earth Observations, from its formation in 2003 until September 2005. Recently she was appointed co-chair of the USGEO.

  • Thursday, May 3 - Dr. Scott Gende, ecologist of the Glacier Bay Field Station of Glacier Bay National Park discussed "The Whales and Cruise Ships of Glacier Bay".

    Abstract: With abundant marine wildlife and numerous tidewater glaciers, Glacier Bay National Park is a coveted destination for cruise ships in Alaska. On average, about 95% of the approximately 350,000 visitors per year that visit Glacier Bay arrive aboard cruise ships. Regulation of ship entries into the park is guided by the recently completed Vessel Quota and Operating Requirements Final EIS. The FEIS maintained the maximum of 2 ship entries per day, but allowed for an increase of up to 32% in the number of seasonal entries. The decision to allow for an increase in ship entries will be based, in part, on studies that examine the potential impacts that the increase may have on resources in the park. Dr. Gende will briefly describe mandates of the park and management of vessel traffic. He will also describe the suite of studies currently under way addressing potential impacts from cruise ships, including an effort intended to quantify the encounter rate (how often and how close) between cruise ships and humpback whales using data collected from shipboard observers. The encounter rate data will be folded into probabilistic-based models to estimate the probabilities of a ship strike under different conditions (locations within the park, whale densities, ship speed, weather, behavior of whales at time of encounter, etc.). Many of these studies are currently under way and thus the focus will be on describing their progress, methods, and types of effects examined.

  • Wednesday, May 16 - Dr. John Cloud, NOAA Central Library Historian, will present "The Creme of American Cartography 'Greatest Hits' from the Coast and Geodetic Survey's Library and Archives Collection", a NOAA Heritage Seminar. Powerpoint Presentation.

    Abstract: Behind the charts published by NOAA there has always existed an understructure of precise geodetic networks and original manuscript maps and other data, which converge in the charts. NOAA's system traces back directly to practices developed by Ferdinand Hassler, A.D. Bache and their staffs in the 1830s and 1840s for the Survey of the Coast. For more than a century, all these elements were gathered in the Coast and Geodetic Survey's Library and Archives Collection. The Library remains, but the Archives were dispersed--until now! Highlights from the former Archives now in the National Archives have been scanned through NOAA's Climate Data Modernization Program (CDMP) and will be presented, including many rare original graphics unseen for decades. Amongst other matters, they reveal that today's "One NOAA" was fully functional in the 19th century.

  • Thursday, May 17 - Ballard Maritime Academy students return! Don't miss this engaging presentation by 5 high school students from the Ballard Maritime Academy, Seattle, Washington. Students will discuss NOAA's role in supporting the academy, how students have benefited from the program, and an overview of the academy's curriculum and history. NOAA awards a grant each year to the academy to fund curriculum development and a trip to Washington, D.C. for 5 Ballard students and 2 teachers. This seminar was sponsored by NOAA Teacher at Sea Program.

  • Wednesday, May 23, 2007 - "An Update on the Smithsonian Ocean Initiative/Ocean Hall" - presented by Fred Gorell of the NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration, Davida Remer and Mike Shelby of the NOS Special Projects Office.
  • Thursday, May 24, 2007 - NOAA's National Marine Protected Areas Center - "MPAs and MPA Networks: Progress in the U.S. and Internationally." Annie Hillary, NOS Office of International Affairs and Joe Uravitch, Director, NOS, Office of Ocean and Coastal Resource Management, National MPA Center. Powerpoint Presentation
  • Tuesday June 5, 2007 - Mike Kelly of NOAA Fisheries presented "FishWatch and its Development." FishWatch is NOAA's new seafood consumer awareness program. Powerpoint presentation (pdf; 134 KB)
  • Wednesday, June 13, 2007 - Dennis Donahue, Operations Director, NOAA's Great Lakes Environmental Research Lab presented "Being Green While Studying the Blue." Powerpoint Presentation

    Abstract: Dennis Donahue, Operations Director, NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Laboratory, discussed how NOAA was able to convert three Great Lakes research vessels from petroleum-based products to bio-fuels and lubricants. Donahue's efforts resulted in a 2006 award from the U.S. Department of Energy and a 2007 White House Closing-the-Circle award. The conversion of the ships reduced costs and has a positive impact on the environment as well as provides a better work situation for the ships' crews and researchers. The Great Lakes laboratory's Ship Operations Group has focused their efforts on innovative ways to engineer, operate, and maintain these vessels to not only support scientific missions but to advance NOAA's larger mission as a steward of the marine environment. The work follows a 1998 Executive Order calling for the "greening" of Government agencies through waste reduction, recycling, and environmentally friendly and sustainable products, including bio-products.

  • June 21, 2007 - Training offered on Endnote bibliographic software tool, presented by ISI Thomson Research Training Consultant. 2 classes will be offered in the morning and repeated in the afternoon.

    9:00 - 10:30 am - Introduction to Endnote and How to Create an Endnote Library
    10:45 - 12:15 noon - Using Endnote in Microsoft Word; Searching an Endnote Library; Create a Subject Bibliography
    1:00 - 2:30 pm - Introduction to Endnote and How to Create an Endnote Library
    2:45 - 4:15 pm - Using Endnote in Microsoft Word; Searching an Endnote Library; Create a Subject Bibliography
    Please R.S.V.P. to Mary.Lou.Cumberpatch@noaa.gov, 713-2600 ext 129.

    NOAA has an agency-wide site license for these applications. Visit the NOAA IT Electronic Store (NITES) web site's "NOAA Site License with ISI ResearchSoft for Bibliographic Management Tools" page: http://www.nites.noaa.gov/bpa/display.asp?bpaID=6. These tools are great for program or office-wide sharing of citations, documents, and images. Network and web versions are available.

  • June 27, 2007 - Guifang (Julia) Xue, Law of the Sea Institute, Ocean University of China, presented "Cooperative Management for the Shared Fisheries Resources of the China Seas." Sponsored by NOAA Fisheries Office of Science and Technology.
    Powerpoint Presentation
    Abstract: The Yellow Sea and East China Sea (China Seas) are semi-enclosed seas where the fish stocks are mainly shared among China, Japan, and South Korea (the China Seas states). The shared nature of fish stocks makes their conservation and management difficult, and efforts by any single state are incomplete and ineffective. The LOSC grants coastal states sovereign rights and jurisdiction over the resources of their EEZs, but the China Seas states have not reached agreement on their EEZs boundaries due to overlapping claims. Fisheries disputes have been common and the cooperative management of the shared resources needs to be promoted. The seminar will firstly review: 1) the existing bilateral fisheries agreements between China and Japan, and China and South Korea; 2) the necessity for cooperative management of the shared resources and the LOSC frameworks applicable to such cooperation; and 3) the challenges from a Chinese perspective. The second part of the seminar will provide a case study of fisheries co-operation between China and Vietnam for the Gulf of Tonkin. It will review the management measures pertaining to the Agreed Zones under the Agreement, and will highlight the achievements of the Agreement and pinpoints the crucial role of implementation to the success of the fisheries co-operation.
  • Friday, July 13, 2007 - "NOAA's Virtual World: Experiencing the Edge of Space to the Bottom of the Ocean" presented by Eric Hackathorne of NOAA's Earth Systems Research Laboratory.

    Abstract:
    Soar through a hurricane on the wing of a research aircraft, rise gently through the atmosphere atop a weather balloon or search for hidden underwater cave on a side trip from a NOAA submersible. These and other virtual adventures are attracting large numbers of "avatars," or virtual selves, to one of the first government-sponsored, Earth-science "island" in the rapidly growing online world Second Life. The NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory developed the site for visitors to collectively share experiences in a virtual world they may not have in the physical world, and learn about the cutting-edge science that NOAA conducts regularly. Eric Hackathorn is the chief architect for NOAA's virtual world and will present an overview of the project. He and his much handsomer counterpart Hackshaven Harford (a virtual representation of himself) will discuss their vision of how NOAA could potentially use this technology in its future infrastructure.

    Video - Tour NOAA's Virtual Island: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=is8YX32GAyQ
    More information: NOAA's ESRL Virtual World website

  • July 19, 2007 - Dr. Ed Miles, Professor of Marine Affairs and Public Affairs at the University of Washington, Seattle, presented "Climate Impacts on the World Ocean: The Challenge of Multiple Stresses."
  • 08/09/07 - 12:00 - 2:00 ET- An Inconvenient Truth (NOAA Auditorium, SSMC5)

  • 08/23/07 - Laura Taylor Singer of the Gulf of Maine Research Institute presented "New England’s Marine Resource Education Program - Bridging the Gap among Fishermen, Scientists and Managers."

    Abstract:
    It has been widely acknowledged that the complex system of fisheries science and management is difficult for many fishermen and others to navigate. Fishermen attending fishery management council meetings, serving as advisors to the management processes, or partnering in collaborative research, require baseline information to be effective in their roles. In addition to information challenges, there are cultural differences among those interested in fisheries management. Often, the issues that arise in a management setting are based on a lack of understanding and trust. In New England, the Marine Resource Education Program (MREP) was created by fishery activists in the region to address these issues. The curriculum, tailored specifically for fishermen and relevant stakeholder groups, covers two topic areas: a three-day Fishery Science Module, followed by a three-day Fishery Management Module. MREP has become a recognized training program for fishermen, managers, scientists and environmentalists in the region and has recently gained national interest.

  • Friday, September 7 - Dr. Steven Swartz, NOAA Fisheries'Office of Science and Technology Marine Ecosystems Division, presented "Sentinals of the Sea: Gray Whales' Response to Climate Change" - Powerpoint slides
  • Monday, September 10 - Celeste Leroux, a graduate student at the University of Alaska-Fairbanks School of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences and the Alaska Sea Grant College Program, presentd an "Introduction to the Alaska King Crab Research, Rehabilitation & Biology Program." - Powerpoint slides
  • Friday, September 14, 2007 the NOAA Central Library will present a NOAA Heritage Seminar "The Age of the BLAKE" by Thomas Jackson of the NOS Office of Coast Survey. NOTE! The seminar will be held in the Fourth Floor Conference Room of SSMC #3 between 10 A.M. and 11 A.M.

    Abstract:
    The Coast and Geodetic Survey Steamer BLAKE was among the most innovative and prolific of Nineteenth Century oceanographic research vessels. Besides holding records for number of deep sea soundings taken by any oceanographic ship of the era, it also pioneered: 1) the use of steel rope (as opposed to hemp rope) for over-the-side operations; 2) deep-sea anchoring; 3) piano-wire deep sea sounding technologies; and 3) data presentation techniques such as 3-D seafloor diagrams. The BLAKE conducted research along the Atlantic coast of the United States, in the Gulf of Mexico, and the Caribbean Sea and is commemorated by the name Blake Plateau off the southeast United States and such names as the Sigsbee Escarpment, named for its most famous captain, in the Gulf of Mexico. A scale model of the Blake will be on display that was constructed by Mr. Jackson.

  • Wednesday, September 19 - Zdenka Willis, director of NOAA's Integrated Ocean Observation System (IOOS) Program presented an overview of the program.
    Powerpoint slides
  • Thursday, September 20 - Dr. John M. Miller of NOAA's Air Resources Laboratory presented the "Science and the Cold War."
  • Thursday, October 11 - Kevin H. Amos, Aquatic Animal Health Coordinator, NOAA Aquaculture Program, presented "Disease Interactions between Farmed and Wild Fish – Fact and Fiction."
    Abstract: Although farmed seafood is a safe and healthy choice for U.S. consumers, concerns have been raised about potentially negative environmental impacts associated with aquaculture operations. Concerns usually focus on marine finfish cultured in nets in costal areas, or cages in the open ocean. This presentation will separate fact from fiction when it comes to disease interactions between farmed and wild fish.
    Powerpoint slides
  • Thursday, October 18 - Tim Owen, NOAA's National Climatic Data Center, presented an overview of the U.S. Drought Portal (drought.gov), the new U.S. interagency portal providing critical and updated information on drought to stakeholders.
    Abstract: Drought.gov is an integral element of the National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS). Championed by the Western Governors' Association (WGA), NIDIS was established by federal legislation in 2006. NIDIS is a dynamic and accessible drought risk information system that provides users with the ability to determine the potential impacts of drought, and the decision suppport tools needed to better prepare for and mitigate the effects of drought. The U.S. Drought portal will utilize common data and metadata standards to assure optimal interoperability as well as leveraging the Federal Enterprise Architecture (FEA).
    Powerpoint slides
  • Friday, 19 October - Dave Hardy, of NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service Systematics Laboratory at the Smithsonian, presented "Why study biodiversity? An example from the Island of Tobago, West Indies." This was a joint NODC-NOAA Central Library seminar.
    Abstract: Since 1962 Dave has been conducting a study of bodiversity on the Island of Tobago, West Indies. This effort has resulted in the discovery of 52 new taxa (1 family, 2 genera, and 52 new species). During the same time period (1962 to present), ten species (5 birds, 3 reptiles, 1 mammal, and 1 crustacean) have apparently become extint on the Island. The impact of extinction on the environment will probably not be fully understood until we have identified as many un-discovered species as possible. There is thus an urgent need for in-depth studies of biodiversity not only in Tobago, but throughout the World.
    Powerpoint Slides
  • Thursday, November 1 - Dr. Thomas S. Lowry, Senior Member of the Technical Staff, Sandia National Laboratories, presented "Converting Information into Insight: A Multi-Platform Decision Support Tool for Systems Level Management".
    Abstract: The Computer Assisted Dispute Resolution system (CADRe) is a web-based tool that offers a single, unified framework and system architecture capable of serving as the cornerstone for communicating results of science-based analyses. Initially built and tested through an interactive stakeholder process to aid in public-mediated water resource planning in the central Texas region, CADRe is designed to support shared vision planning processes. CADRe is a core modeling and negotiation system that combines spatially explicit numerical models, system dynamics models, and a tabu meta-heuristic search algorithm to maximize outcomes from participatory dialogues by turning detailed information into systems level insight; facilitating group decisions concerning complex, integrated systems.
    Powerpoint slides
  • Tuesday, November 27 - Pam Rubinoff, Coastal Management Extension Specialist, University of Rhode Island Sea Grant program, and Lynn Richards, Senior Policy Analyst EPA Smart Growth program, will discuss "Waterfront Smart Growth Elements".
    Abstract:
    In 1996, the Smart Growth Network developed 10 Smart Growth Principles based on the characteristics of communities considered to be thriving, diverse and successful. The 10 principles, however, do not directly address the unique challenges and opportunities faced by coastal and waterfront communities. To help fill this gap, an EPA-NOAA Sea Grant collaborative team drafted additional waterfront and coastal smart growth elements. The waterfront and coastal smart growth elements distill waterfront-related aspects of the smart growth principles, providing context-sensitive development approaches to help communities address their unique waterfront characteristics. Like the smart growth principles, these elements are intended as guidelines for communities to consider incorporating into new development projects, or as retrofits to existing development. Coastal and waterfront communities across the U.S. have found they achieve better economic, environmental, community and public health outcomes by incorporating aspects of these 10 elements. The elements provide guidance for communities, helping them highlight their natural assets in order to create great locations for residents and visitors alike.
    Link: University of Rhode Island Sea Grant
    Powerpoint slides (ppt, 33 MB)

    Thursday, December 13 at 11:30 - Annual Holiday Brown Bag Seminar featuring NOAA Administrator Vice Admiral Lautenbacher and the "One NOAA Holiday Band and Chorus." Please join library staff in enjoying treats, coffee, and the holiday spirit. NOTE: To be held in SSMC#3, Conference Room #4527.
    Abstract:
    On December 13, NOAA’s Administrator, Vice Admiral Lautenbacher will present “Positioning NOAA for Tomorrow's Opportunities” as part of the NOAA Central Library’s brown bag luncheon series. Come join VADM Lautenbacher as he shares his thoughts on how NOAA has evolved during his tenure and how NOAA can be prepared for the transition from his administration to the next. He will highlight many of NOAA’s recent accomplishments and discuss some of the challenges and opportunities that lay ahead for NOAA.

2008 Brown Bags

  • Thursday, January 10 - Dr. John M. Miller of NOAA's Air Resources Laboratory spoke about the 50th Anniversary of NOAA's Mauna Loa Observatory. The Observatory is located on the north flank of Mauna Loa Volcano, on the Big Island of Hawaii. The observatory is best known for its measurements of rising anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations in the atmosphere. This trend is sometimes referred to as the "Keeling Curve" or "Mauna Loa Curve."
  • Thursday, February 7
    Dr. Dwayne Meadows of NOAA Fisheries made a presentation on shipwrecks of the Northwest Hawaiian Islands as part of NOAA Heritage Week. This seminar will take place in the NOAA Central Library.

    Friday, February 15
    CoCoRaHS, the Communty Collaborative Rain, Hail and Snow Network! presented by Henry Reges and Nolan Doesken of Colorado State.

    Abstract: What do meteorologists, hydrologists, farmers, emergency managers, newspaper reporters, golfers and baseball players have in common? They all keep track of precipitation! Precipitation is one of the most important of all climate elements for daily life. Yet, precipitation varies tremendously from place to place and from month to month and year to year. These variations have widespread impacts. This seminar will describe a project where people of all ages, using very simple and low cost instruments, are helping scientists study storms and precipitation patterns. Volunteers provide valuable data for NOAA applications while learning directly about climate processes, impacts and research. Methods for measuring rain, hail and snow will be demonstrated, and CoCoRaHS results will be shown including precipitation patterns from recent storms.

    Henry Reges is the National Coordinator for CoCoRaHS at Colorado State University. He was formerly with the American Meteorological Society in Boston, MA. Nolan Doesken is the State Climatologist for Colorado and has worked for the Colorado Climate Center at Colorado State University since 1977. He initiated the CoCoRaHS project after an extremely localized storm in 1997 dropped over 14 inches (350 mm) of rain near his home but was not well detected by existing observing systems. Nolan Doesken has worked closely with National Weather Service headquarters on several snow measurement projects.

    Wednesday, March 5
    Dr. Gunnar Knapp, University of Alaska-Anchorage presented "Implications of Aquaculture for Wild Fisheries: The Case of Alaska Wild Salmon."

    Abstract:

    Worldwide aquaculture production is growing rapidly. The experience of Alaska wild salmon suggests that aquaculture may have significant and wide-ranging potential implications for wild fisheries. Salmon farming exposed wild salmon’s natural monopoly to competition, expanding supply and driving down prices. Wild salmon has faced both inherent as well as self-inflicted challenges in competing with farmed salmon. The economic pressures caused by competition from farmed salmon have been painful and difficult for the wild salmon industry, fishermen and communities. However, these pressures have contributed to changes which have helped make the salmon industry more economically viable. Farmed salmon has greatly expanded the market and created new market opportunities for wild salmon. Farmed salmon has benefited consumers by lowering prices, expanding supply, developing new products, and improving quality of both farmed and wild salmon. Salmon farming has had no apparent direct effects on Alaska wild salmon resources, but could have indirect effects on wild salmon resources which might be positive or negative. The experience of Alaska wild salmon suggests that anyone interested in wild fisheries should pay close attention to what is happening in aquaculture. No wild fishery market—especially for higher valued species—should be taken for granted.

    Tuesday, March 11
    Dr. Daniel R. Brooks, Professor, Department of Zoology, University of Toronto and Fellow, Royal Society of Canada, will present "Emerging Infectious Diseases: Evolutionary Accidents Waiting to Happen." Sponsored by NOAA Restoration Center.


    Powerpoint slides

    Abstract:

    Today’s bio-diversity crisis is not just one of lost habitats and extinct species. It is also a crisis of emerging infectious diseases (EID’s), such as HIV in humans, Ebola in humans and gorillas, West Nile virus and Avian Influenza in humans and birds, chytrid fungi in amphibians, and distemper in sea lions. There is every reason to take these events seriously, because EID’s appear to have a long evolutionary history. Geographical restriction and specialized transmission mean that in most time periods, most pathogens occur in a small number of host species, often only one, but retain the ability to infect more. However, climate change alters everything. Species move out of their areas of origin and ecosystems change. Pathogens come into contact with susceptible hosts that they have never before encountered, and that never had the opportunity to evolve resistance. As a result, EID’s are not just possible; they are inevitable. Indeed, every episode of climate change has produced them. If EID’s were rare, management through crisis response might be cost-effective. But EID’s are not rare at all. Rather, they are a common outcome of geographic dispersal associated with large-scale environmental changes.

    We face a potential crisis, however, that stems from our fundamental ignorance about the biosphere, for it is impossible to be proactive about species of pathogens whose existence has not been documented. This makes many pathogens “evolutionary land mines” awaiting us as we relocate to novel habitats, move species around, and alter existing ecosystems. Nevertheless, most resources are still being allocated for responses to known EID’s rather than to assessing the risk of potential EID’s. Simply put, we must complete the global inventory of pathogenic species. Now. The question is whether we find them before they find us.

    About the Speaker: Professor Daniel R. Brooks is a parasitologist of world renown and teaches in the Department of Zoology at the University of Toronto, Ontario, CANADA. He was conferred the honor of Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada in 2004 and has received numerous awards and honors for his research contributions from organizations and institutions of higher learning in Canada, the U.S., and other countries. He has conducted research in Canada, the U.S., Colombia, Venezuela, Mexico, Brazil,, Costa Rica, Uruguay, and Ecuador. In addition to his teaching and mentoring duties at U.T., he is coordinator of the Inventory of Eukaryotic Parasites of Vertebrates in the Area de Conservación Guanacaste, Costa Rica, a World Heritage Site. He studies parasites in many countries and is interested in the dynamics of emerging infectious diseases around the world. He is currently amassing a database of parasites which will contain all published phylogenetic trees for parasitic helminths (worms) of vertebrates (including DNA information), in an effort to recognize, predict, and prevent parasitic infestations in humans in the future. He views unknown parasites and pathogens as “evolutionary land mines” awaiting us as we relocate to novel habitats, move species around, and alter existing ecosystems.

    Thursday, March 20 from 11:30 - 1:00
    The key speaker was G. Carlton Ray, a research professor from the University of Virginia. Professor Ray has years of experience monitoring Arctic populations of marine mammals and their habitats. He will speak on how "Climate Change Places Ice-Dependent Beringian Mammals At Risk."
    Powerpoint Slides (all images are copyrighted)

    Friday, March 21 at 12 noon
    Dr. Brandon Southall Director, NOAA Ocean Acoustics Program, presented "Behavioral Response Study (BRS) of Deep-Diving Cetaceans in Tongue of the Ocean, Bahamas."

    Abstract: Initial results are reported from a study designed to provide science-based approaches for mitigating risk of sonar to beaked and other whales. The study on beaked and other whale behavioral responses to mid-frequency sonar and other sounds was conducted at the AUTEC range near Andros Island, Bahamas, where Blainvilles beaked whales (/Mesoplodon densirostris/) can regularly be detected using passive acoustic monitoring of their echolocation clicks. Tags recorded sound at the whale and behavior of the whale. Data were collected from 10 tags; 6 on Blainvilles beaked whales, 4 on pilot whales. 109 hours of data were collected from tags; 74h from beaked whales; 34h from pilot whales. Playbacks of mid-frequency sonar and killer whale sounds were performed on 1 tagged beaked whale and 2 tagged pilot whales.The tagged beaked whale responded to both sonar and killer whale sounds by premature cessation of clicking during foraging dives (RL = ~117 dB re 1 µPa for the killer whale sound, ~145 dB for the sonar), with unusually slow and long ascents. Following the two exposures, the beaked whale exhibited sustained and directed avoidance of the area for at least 10 hours.

    Thursday, April 10 at 11:30 am
    "Exploration of Hudson Submarine Canyon Region Offshore New York and New Jersey" presented by Peter A. Rona, Ph.D., Professor of Marine Geology and Geophysics, Institute of Marine and Coastal Sciences, Rutgers University.

    Thursday, April 10 at 12:45 pm
    "Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary as a Case Study for Characterizing and Managing Regional Underwater Noise Budgets" presented by Dr. Leila Hatch, Regional Marine Bioacoustic Coordinator for Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary.

    Wednesday, April 16 at 12 noon
    "The IPCC Assessment Process: Future Projections of Climate Change" presented by Ronald J. Stouffer, Senior Research Meteorologist, Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory
    About the speaker: Ronald J. Stouffer is a senior research meteorologist in the Climate Dynamics Group of the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL), Princeton, NJ, a federal research laboratory within the Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, of the U.S. Department of Commerce. Stouffer is one of the leading climate modelers in the world, and uses complex numerical models to study and predict the behavior of the earth's climate system. Because of his scientific contributions to climate research over the past two decades, he has been a central contributor to each of the assessment reports for the Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change (IPCC) and has been a chapter author for the three most recent reports.
    Powerpoint slides (MS Powerpoint, 10,169 KB; download free Microsoft PowerPoint Viewer)

    Thursday, April 17 at 12 noon
    "Bottom-up control of the eastern Bering Sea ecosystem: implications for integrated ecosystem assessment during a period of climate change" presented by Dr. Jeffrey Napp from the Alaska Fisheries Science Center and Dr. Phyllis Stabeno from the Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory.
    Powerpoint slides (MS Powerpoint, 68,840 KB; download free Microsoft PowerPoint Viewer)

    Abstract: The eastern Bering Sea is responding to climate change which is having a profound impact on all levels of the food chain, including commercial and protected species and humans. Changes in the presence of sea ice (timing, extent, and thickness) impacts the heat content and stratification of the water column, nutrient supplies, the timing and magnitude of the spring bloom, zooplankton biomass and species composition, and fish distributions. NOAA’s North Pacific Climate Regimes and Ecosystem Productivity program (NPCREP) is working with academic and other partners to measure and quantify these changes and synthesize the results. Our research will provide key observations and the understanding necessary to infer how future changes in climate will impact the abundance and production of ecosystem goods and services.

    Wednesday, April 23 at 12 noon
    Dr. John Everett, formerly Chief of the Division of Research of NOAA Fisheries, will present " Going Against the Flow - Non-Conventional Wisdom in the Management of Fisheries." Dr. Everett will discuss his findings concerning the menhaden fisheries and the effects of scallop dredging.
    Powerpoint Slides (MS Powerpoint, 68,840 KB; download free Microsoft PowerPoint Viewer)

    Wednesday, April 30 at 12 noon
    Darin Figurskey, NWS MIC, Raleigh, NC spoke on Sea Grant’s role and relationship with the "NOAA in the Carolinas" effort and the initiative’s continued success, while Suzanne Van Cooten, NOAA National Severe Storms Laboratory (NSSL) will discuss the development of the Coastal & Inland Flood Observation and Warning (CI-FLOW). Sponsored by the NOAA SeaGrant Program.
    Powerpoint Slides - NOAA in the Carolinas
    Powerpoint Slides - CI-FlOW

    Abstract: The programs of the national Sea Grant network partner with other NOAA programs and offices throughout the country in many ways. In an effort to formalize and better facilitate such relationships, the "NOAA in the Carolinas" initiative was launched to promote regional partnership development, coordination, and communication among NOAA programs.

    Two speakers discussed "NOAA in the Carolinas" and some of its successes on April 30th at the Ralph Rayburn Beltway Brown Bag seminar, which will take place at noon in the NOAA Library, second floor of SSMC 3. Darin Figurskey, NWS MIC, Raleigh, NC will speak on Sea Grant’s role and relationship with the "NOAA in the Carolinas" effort and the initiative’s continued success, while Suzanne Van Cooten, NOAA National Severe Storms Laboratory (NSSL) will discuss the development of the Coastal & Inland Flood Observation and Warning (CI-FLOW), which began after the massive flooding associated with Hurricane Floyd in North and South Carolina. The research staff at NSSL in Norman, Oklahoma along with a Sea Grant network outreach team began working on CI-FLOW in 2000 to create a "mountains to the sea" precipitation, flood and surge observing system to better monitor, model and ultimately forecast, in association with the NOAA NWS, inland flooding and storm surge often associated with tropical storm systems.

    "NOAA in the Carolinas" was conceived in 2004 by the North Carolina Sea Grant program as a way to demonstrate NOAA’s presence in the state and highlight how NOAA offices cooperate and collaborate with each other across the region. All of these relationships pre-date "One NOAA" and clearly demonstrate how programs do and must continue to work together to achieve mutual goals. Four successive annual meetings have been conducted and the effort is now formally associated with NOAA’s regional program in the southeast-- SECART.

    Thursday, May 1 at 12 noon
    Sebastian Belle, Executive Director of the Maine Aquaculture Association, presented "Lessons Learned for Aquaculture in Maine." Sponsored by the NOAA Aquaculture program.

    Abstract: Maine has the most extensive and diverse marine aquaculture sector of any state in the nation. Maine also has some of the strictest aquaculture environmental regulations and monitoring requirements in the world. Based on farm gate sales – worth over $80 million dollars annually – Maine has been the number one marine aquaculture state for 10 of the last 15 years. On a per acre basis, farm raised salmon, oysters, mussels, and baitfish are the most valuable agricultural crops raised in Maine. But, like any human activity, aquaculture involves risk and can have environmental impacts. The Maine Aquaculture Association and its member growers are widely recognized as pioneers in the development of innovative and sustainable farming methods designed to enhance their stewardship of Maine's marine environments. Through a 14-point set of environmental guiding principles, cooperative bay management and a comprehensive code of practice, Maine’s aquatic farmers are leading the way in a new, environmentally sustainable way to produce seafood. With good science, political will and technical expertise, achieving a balance between conservation and economic development has been possible in Maine.

    Speaker Bio: Sebastian Belle is the Executive Director of the Maine Aquaculture Association, the oldest state aquaculture association in the country. He has been working in commercial fishing and aquaculture for over 30 years. He has worked in 14 different countries growing over 15 species using a number of different production methods.

    Monday, May 12 at 12 noon
    Ballard Maritime Academy students return! Don't miss this engaging presentation by 5 high school students from the Ballard Maritime Academy, Seattle, Washington. Students will discuss how they have benefited from the program, an overview of the academy's curriculum, and how NOAA plays a role in supporting the academy. There will be a game at the end...with prizes!

    Wednesday, May 21
    Dr. Eddie Bernard, Director of NOAA's OAR Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, will present ""The 3 things you need to know about tsunamis".

    Tuesday, June 3
    Tom Knutson, a research meteorologist at NOAA's Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory in Princeton, New Jersey, presesnted "Have Humans Affected Atlantic Hurricane Climate?"
    Powerpoint Slides(MS Powerpoint, 6.33 MB; download free Microsoft PowerPoint Viewer)
    Audio (mp3, 66 MB; download free Windows Media Player)

    Wednesday, June 11
    Author/Illustrator Taylor Morrison presented "Illustrating and Interpreting NOAA's Work for Kids"
    Powerpoint slides (MS Powerpoint; download free Microsoft PowerPoint Viewer)
    Abstract:
    This presentation by award winning author Taylor Morrison explained the process behind researching and writing science books for children and painting the accompanying book illustrations. Topics include five books on NOAA and it's rich history of Geodetic Surveying, Nautical Charts, Tsunami Warnings, Fire Weather, Tides, and Fisheries. Taylor has given many presentations around the country at many elementary and middle schools to raise awareness about NOAA and its programs. Mr. Morrison has published 10 books since 1996. Awards include Natural History Magazine best books of 2007,The Boston Globe Horn Book Award for Children's non-fiction 2006, The Texas Blue Bonnet Award 2002, The Society of Illustrators Book Art Award 1997, Smithsonian Magazine best books of 1998, Los Angeles Times Best Books of 2000, Award from the Secretary of The State of Washington for The Coast Mappers, and many others.

    Thursday, June 12
    John S. Friedman will present a discussion of his new book "Out of the Blue: A history of lightning, science, superstition, and amazing stories of survival."

    Friday, June 13 at 11:00 am
    Mary Glackin, Deputy Under Secretary for Oceans and Atmosphere, presented "The Transition: Challenges and Opportunities" a "OneNOAA Science Discussion Seminar".
    Presentation (pdf)
    Abstract:
    The topic of the transition between Administrations is front and center on many people’s minds. During the seminar I will provide an overview of the changes we expect to see over the next year and address the proactive measures that NOAA is taking to capitalize on the opportunities associated with these changes. Specific topics to be discussed include: personnel changes; priority issues for the public; NOAA’s external environment; and leadership priorities.

    Wednesday, June 25th
    Dr. Jack Harlan from NOS/ASTADM will discuss high frequency radar and mapping coastal currents.
    Abstract:
    This seminar will give participants an in-depth look at High Frequency Radar (HFR) - a technology for measuring ocean surface current velocities (speed and direction) and surface waves in near real time. This information can be used during search and rescue operations to track the probable path of victims and drifting ships. HFR data can also be used to support oil spill response, harmful algal bloom monitoring, and assessment of coastal water quality. The information can additionally provide value in ecosystem assessment and fisheries management, when evaluated retrospectively.

    Unlike many other techniques, HFR is unaffected by weather conditions such as clouds, fog or precipitation. Because its signal hugs the ocean’s surface, and is conducted by it, HFR can observe the ocean at distances far beyond the line-of-sight (distances often exceed 200 km). Also, this surface-hugging mode makes the placement of HFRs more flexible, in that they can be located almost anywhere along the shoreline. By combining data from two HFRs, a two-dimensional map of surface currents can be produced, spanning thousands of square kilometers.

    Currently, about 100 HFRs are operating on US coastlines. Nearly all are owned by research universities working in partnership with NOAA IOOS. NOAA’s current HFR efforts are led by the IOOS Program in partnerships with NOS/CO-OPS and NWS/NDBC. This technology was developed in the 1970’s and 1980’s in a NOAA Research laboratory in Boulder, Colorado and was referred to as Coastal Ocean Dynamics Applications Radar (CODAR). After that development, a commercial company was spun off that markets the HFRs under the name CODAR Ocean Sensors SeaSondes®. More than 90 percent of the HFRs in the US are of the CODAR type. The seminar will give an HFR overview including details on the national HFR data server and management system, regional capabilities and future plans.

    Thursday, June 26
    Dr. Jawed Hameedi, NOS/NCCOS/Center for Coastal Monitoring and Assessment, will present "We and Nitrogen: Explosives to Eutrophication".
    Powerpoint slides
    Abstract:
    For centuries, availability of the naturally-occurring, reactive forms of nitrogen have significantly influenced human behavior and societies through festivals, agricultural ingenuity, global trade, resource-use conflicts and war. Key milestones during this odyssey have included impromptu discovery of crackling bamboos (B.C.); protracted but initially accidental invention of gunpowder (600 to 900 A.D.); a well-designed, progressive and benevolent system of crop rotation, engineered irrigation, and cash-marketing for crops (8th to 13th centuries); and the very elegant and momentous Haber-Bosch process of nitrogen fixation (1909-13). Global use of nitrogen in recent years has become unprecedented and is largely responsible for nutrient over-enrichment in coastal bays and estuaries. Nitrogen pollution is largely a consequence of increasing biological production in order to feed the human population along with emissions of millions of tons of nitrogen oxides from combustion of fossil fuel, high density animal farming, industrial processes, and natural sources. Despite provisions in federal legislation and agency directives during the past three decades, there are no numerical criteria to limit nitrogen input to coastal bays and estuaries. In part, this is due to nitrogen’s occurrence in various chemical forms and cycling in different parts of the environment. It is also due to its many effects, which include unsafe drinking water, soil acidity, smog, ozone depletion, eutrophication, and greenhouse warming. This presentation also points out certain limitations in understanding nitrogen deposition and budgets in the biosphere. They include knowledge of the structure and activity of the enzyme nitrogenase, scenarios of carbon sequestration in forests, significance of nitrogen fixation in the ocean, release of carbon dioxide from bogs and wetlands, ocean acidification, and whether nitrogen is the limiting nutrient in the sea.

    Wednesday, July 2
    Dr. Robert Simpson Will Be Honored as a NOAA Environmental Hero for 2008
    Dr. Simpson will be presented the 2008 NOAA Environmental Hero Award for Longtime Achievement by Dr. Richard Spinrad, NOAA assistant administrator for oceanic and atmospheric research. Following the presentation, Dr. Simpson will give remarks "Remembering Mauna Loa".
    Many are familiar with Dr. Simpson as the other half of the Saffir-Simpson hurricane scale. But few know that the idea to locate an atmospheric observatory high atop a Hawaiian volcano was his as well. Because of that vision which also gave us the iconic Keeling Curve showing the increase of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, Dr. Simpson will receive the 2008 NOAA Environmental Hero Award for Longtime Achievement.
    More information: NOAA Press Release

    Thursday, July 17th at 12 noon
    Zdenka Willis, Director of NOAA Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) program, will present "IOOS: Our Eyes on the Oceans, Coasts, and Great Lakes."
    Powerpoint slides (pdf format)
    Abstract:
    As "our eyes on the oceans, coasts, and Great Lakes", the Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) is a tool for tracking, predicting, managing, and adapting to changes in our marine environment. IOOS delivers the data and information needed to increase our understanding of our waters, so decision makers can take action to improve safety, enhance the economy, and protect the environment.

    NOAA is proud to lead a national partnership of 17 federal agencies and 11 regions working together to link marine data in an easy-to-use standard format that will provide users with a composite picture of our nation's waters in an accurate and timely manner. This seminar will discuss some of the complexities of the national IOOS efforts, what NOAA and its partners are doing to integrate our ocean and coastal data, and IOOS benefits to data users, the general public, and the nation.

    Thursday, July 24 at 12 noon

    Marine Policy Issues: First in a Series of Panel Presentations given by Knauss Sea Grant Fellows

    Anatomy of a Good Policy: Legislation & Community management of Marine Resources in West Hawaii
    Powerpoint slides (pdf)
    Presented by Paulo Maurin, NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program:

    Abstract: This presentation examines Act 306, which went into effect in 1998 and established large Fish Replenishment Areas in West Hawaii. The Act was a response to increasing aquarium fish collecting activities and local community concern over exploitation of the Yellow Tang (Zebrasoma flavescens). The research reexamines tropical aquarium fish collecting patterns in the area and presents key policy and management elements that implemented the West Hawaii Fisheries Council, a successful and sustained structure for the co-management of local marine resources involving fish collectors, government, university and grassroots organizations.

    The Proposed Oregon Coast National Marine Sanctuary: A Case Study in Marine Management
    Powerpoint slides (pdf)
    Presented by Christopher Holmes, Office of Policy, NOAA Fisheries:

    In late 2005, Governor Ted Kulongoski proposed that the Oregon Ocean Stewardship Area should be designated a National Marine Sanctuary. He then consulted with the Oregon Ocean Policy Advisory Council (OPAC), and asked that body to determine the feasibility, extent and public support for his proposal. This presentation will examine the background, objectives and progression of the proposal as it developed since its inception. The policy process will be compared to models offered by Kingdon (1995) and Sabatier & Mazmanian (1983).

    Examining Effectiveness in Regional Ocean Governance Regimes
    Powerpoint slides (pdf)
    Presented by Kateryna M. Wowk, NOAA National Marine Protected Areas Center:

    Abstract: The research examines regional ocean governance regimes including the United Nations Environment Programme’s Regional Seas Programmes and efforts underway by the Global Environment Facility, International Union for the Conservation of Nature, Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission of the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, and the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in managing Large Marine Ecosystems and linked watersheds. The research applies international relations theory, and specifically regime theory, to expand the knowledge base regarding the formation, dynamics and effectiveness of such regimes in an effort to understand when, how and why they work, or conversely, fail.

    Tuesday, August 5 at 12 noon
    AUVfest 2008: Navy Mine-Hunting Robots help NOAA Explore Sunken History

    Abstract: Come and see a High-Def Documentary Film on the Partnership between Office of Naval Research, NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research, and the Naval Undersea Warfare Center. Learn more about the "fest" at
    http://www.oceanexplorer.noaa.gov/explorations/08auvfest/welcome.html.

    Thursday, August 7 at 12 noon
    Chesapeake Bay Studies: Second in a Series of Panel Presentations given by Knauss Sea Grant Fellows

    Microbial Carbon and Nitrogen Cycling in Euphotic Estuarine Sediments: A Case Study from Chesapeake Bay
    Presented by Frank M. Parker, Office of the Assistant Administrator, Oceanic and Atmospheric Research
    Powerpoint slides

    Abstract:Understanding fundamental relationships with respect to carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) flows in estuarine sediments is critical if we are going to mitigate the effects of eutrophication caused by increased N loading to coastal systems. Given the shallow nature of estuaries, a large fraction of the benthos may lie within the photic zone (e.g., ~ 21 % of the Chesapeake Bay is < 2 m deep) and account for as much as half of total estuarine primary production. Here I present results from seasonal dual stable isotopic tracer (DI13C and 15NH4+) experiments that quantify benthic microbial production (e.g., bacteria and benthic microalgae) in terms of C and N, partition that production between water column and porewater nutrient sources in the light and dark, and trace the fate of that production into secondary consumers. Results show that euphotic sediment microbes are an important link in estuarine benthic-pelagic coupling, benthic microalgae play a critical role in the euphotic sediment microbial loop, and benthic bacteria are the dominant microbial pool for C and N immobilization into biomass.

    Laurie McGilvray, Chief, Estuarine Reserves Division, NOS Office of Ocean and Coastal Resource Management, provided an overview of the National Estuarine Research Reserve System and the Graduate Research Fellows Program.

    Thursday, August 28
    Third in a Series of Panel Presentations given by Knauss Sea Grant Fellows

    Sea Grant Fellow Marselle Alexander-Ozinskas, Legislative Assistant to Congresswoman Boradallo, will present "Denitrification Contributes to Nitrogen Loss in Fertilized Arctic Tundra Sites". Sea Grant Fellow Ed Gorecki, Office of the Assistant Administrator, NOAA Fisheries Service, will present "Back from the Beach: A Quantitative Analysis of Beachfront Values and Tax Base".

    Abstracts:
    DENITRIFICATION CONTRIBUTES TO NITROGEN LOSS IN FERTILIZED ARCTIC TUNDRA SITES
    Marselle Alexander-Ozinskas, Legislative Assistant, Congresswoman Boradallo
    Powerpoint slides
    Powerpoint slides for Questions
    About 30% of the global soil carbon pool is stored in northern latitudes (40-70°N), which have experienced larger temperature increases due to atmospheric warming than equatorial regions over the past few decades. Soil temperature increases affect carbon and nitrogen cycling and could alter net ecosystem carbon balance. To examine the future of arctic soil carbon pools following climate-driven changes, the potential for denitrification, nitrification, and mineralization were measured in several ecosystems surrounding the Toolik Lake Long-Term Ecological Research station near Toolik Lake, Alaska, after manipulation to simulate the effects of climate warming. Results indicate that denitrification may contribute to large, observed net nitrogen losses in these systems, suggesting a pathway of potential soil carbon loss following the effects of climate warming.

    BACK FROM THE BEACH: A QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS OF BEACHFRONT VALUES & TAX BASE
    Ed Gorecki, Office of the Assistant Administrator, NOAA Fisheries Service
    The devastation caused by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita resulted in record losses of life and property, and elevated concerns for coastal protection to their highest levels. In addition to rising sea levels over the last several decades, increases in extreme weather events in the Gulf of Mexico have led to substantial beach erosion along the Gulf coast. In 2007 the Nueces County Commissioners Court adopted a 350-foot building set-back along the North Padre Island, TX, coastline. Prior to its implementation, landowners and developers claimed substantial financial losses as a result of this land development restriction. This lecture reviews the economic implications of coastal and environmental protection along the Gulf of Mexico, particularly along the Coast of Nueces County, to determine the significance of this effect on property values, and the potential loss of revenue to the community and local tax base.

    Thursday, September 4
    Legislative Day: Fourth in a Series of Panel Presentations given by Knauss Sea Grant Fellows

    Using GPS collars to monitor the activity and habitat use of Canada lynx in Minnesota
    Powerpoint slides (as pdf)
    Presented by Julie Palakovich Carr, Office of Senator Maria Cantwell
    Since direct observation of free-ranging animals is difficult, remote methods for monitoring animal behavior have been developed. Recent advances in GPS collars allow for both the location and activity of an animal to be recorded internally in the collar. Although several studies have validated the activity counter portion of GPS collars for large herbivores, this has not been done to date on a small carnivore. Methods to relate animal activity level and habitat use were developed by observing a captive Canada lynx wearing a GPS collar. These methods were then applied to data collected from seven free-ranging lynx in northeastern Minnesota. Differences in habitat selection when lynx were active or inactive were analyzed. Additionally, I will be highlighting my research on the effects of maternal characteristics on Atlantic cod recruitment and the effects of a restored oyster reef on water quality.

    The Decay of Particulate Organic Matter in the Ocean and of Bills in the U.S. Senate
    Lynn Abramson, Office of Senator Barbara Boxer
    What do the biological carbon pump and the legislative process have in common? Both concern some form of progression or transport: the biological carbon pump involves the movement of particulate organic matter through the water column, whereas the legislative process involves the movement of bills through Congress. A predictive understanding of either of these processes requires investigation of the source, alteration, and exchange of “material” during transit. In this seminar, Lynn Abramson will draw parallels between her dissertation work on the marine carbon cycle and fellowship work in Senator Barbara Boxer’s office, discussing her perspective on some of the strategies and obstacles involved in affecting science-based policy decisions.

    Regional adaptation in feeding preference for chemically-rich seaweeds by the marine herbivore, Ampithoe longimana
    Powerpoint slides (as pdf)
    Amanda McCarty, Legislative Fellow, Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee, Subcommittee on Oceans, Atmosphere, Fisheries and the Coast Guard
    Field and laboratory manipulations and molecular analysis were used to better understand the ecology and evolution of marine seaweed-herbivore interactions. This work focused specifically on comparisons between populations of the amphipod Ampithoe longimana from cold-temperate New England, warm-temperate North Carolina, and subtropical Florida. Populations from throughout this distribution are exposed to locally distinct seaweed communities, exhibit regional variation in tolerance for a chemically-defended seaweed, and have limited gene flow between regions. Therefore, A. longimana serves as a unique example of a locally adapted marine organism.

    Wednesday, September 10
    Anand Gnanadesikan, an oceanographer at NOAA's Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, Princeton, N.J., will present "Carbon sequestration through ocean iron fertilization: A review of the major issues".
    Powerpoint slides Note: the audio will be available on the NOAA Research site at http://www.research.noaa.gov/podcast/
    Abstract:
    Fertilizing the ocean with iron ("the Geritol solution") has been proposed as a method of removing atmospheric carbon dioxide levels. This talk will discuss how ocean biology stores carbon in the ocean, how iron fertilization might enhance this storage, consider some of the challenges to verifying changes in storage, and highlight some potential unintended consequences of fertilization.

    Tuesday, September 16 at 11:00
    Jacklyn Shafir, Program Manager, D.C. Environmentors Program, will present a review of the benefits to NOAA employees in serving as a mentor to area Senior High School Students, development of a science project and many other volunteer opportunities to help high school students consider careers in the environmental sciences. It is a great opportunity for NOAA employees to share their expertise.

    Thursday, September 18 at 12 noon
    Corals/Marine Protected Areas: Fifth in a Series of Panel Presentations given by Knauss Sea Grant Fellows

    Fine scale genetic population structure in the threatened Acropora palmata and Acropora cervicornis in Southwest Puerto Rico
    Joselyd Garcia, Marine Mammal Commission
    Powerpoint slides (as pdf)
    During the 1980s and 1990s, populations of Acropora palmata and Acropora cervicornis experienced region-wide declines of up to 95% or more in some areas due mostly to disease. Once considered the most important reef builders in the Caribbean, their rapid decline prompted their listing as threatened under the Endangered Species Act in 2006. To understand the genetic connectivity between reefs in southwestern Puerto Rico, sequences of the mitochondrial control region were recovered from geographically adjacent and distant populations of A. palmata and A. cervicornis. Results suggest that there is fine scale population structure and recovery of these reefs might rely on the survival and sexual reproduction of local populations rather than replenishment from distant reefs. In this presentation, I will also discuss my current project and the experiences gained through the U.S. Marine Mammal Commission.

    Do closed fishing areas in New England qualify as marine protected areas?
    Christine Patrick, Ocean Exploration and Research Program
    Powerpoint slides (as pdf)
    Marine protected areas (MPAs) are often presented as a new addition to the “traditional toolkit” of fisheries management measures used by the U.S. federal government. However, temporary or rotational closed areas have been used in New England since before the creation of the federal exclusive economic zone (EEZ) and the expanded federal power to manage fisheries. Despite this fact, the MPA canon does not acknowledge New England closed fishing areas as MPAs, or even as the theoretical ancestors of MPAs. Is this exclusion justified? What are the differences between New England closed fishing areas and MPAs?

    October 2 at 12 noon
    Dr. John L. "Jack" Hayes, NOAA Assistant Administrator for Weather Services and Director, National Weather Service presented "Leading the Way to Better Services."

    Abstract: This is a one year retrospective by Jack Hayes, Director of NOAA National Weather Service. Jack will discuss accomplishments and outline some of the record-breaking weather, water, and climate events the agency has seen during the past year. He will also explore how the NWS is planning to meet the growing demands for weather, water and climate services. Jack has a wealth of domestic and international experience to draw on in this brown bag luncheon. He has held several SES positions within NOAA (NOS, OAR, and NWS), as well as domestic and international experience working for the Air Force and the United Nations' World Meteorological Organization.

    On October 7 at 12 noon
    Dr. Roger Hewitt, Assistant Center Director for Ships and Infrastructure, of the Southwest Fisheries Science Center spoke on ""The Fishery on Antarctic Krill: Defining an Ecosystem Approach to Management".
    Powerpoint slides (pdf format)
    Abstract: Estimates of the standing stock of Antarctic krill ( Euphausia superba ) have ranged from less than 100 million tons to over a billion tons. While considerable uncertainty is associated with these estimates, the fishery on Antarctic krill has the potential to be among the largest in the world. The harvest of Antarctic krill is currently managed by the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR), part of the Antarctic Treaty system. In this discussion the following will be reviewed: the political context and management approach of CCAMLR; the current understanding of natural controls on population growth of the resource; and future options for CCAMLR. It is concluded that the political foundation for the CCAMLR mandate of an "ecosystem approach to management" is sound; that substantial progress has been made toward interpreting and implementing the Convention; and that environmental factors may exert a substantial influence on krill recruitment and population growth. A general outline for the development of a management scheme based on ecosystem process monitoring is presented.

    October 9 at 12 noon
    Dr. Nancy Knowlton of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, and holder of the first endowed ocean science chair at the Smithsonian Institution Sant Ocean Hall, presented "Coral Reefs: Canaries in the Environmental Coal Mine."
    Abstract: Coral reefs are the most diverse of all marine ecosystems. Estimates range from 1-9 million species globally, although these estimates are based on very tenuous assumptions. Coral reefs are also among the most endangered of all marine ecosystems. In the Caribbean, for example, 80% of all coral cover has been lost in the last three decades. The causes of loss are varied, and they operate on local, regional and global scales, often synergistically. Coral bleaching is a stress reaction that results in the loss of symbiotic algae (zooxanthellae) from coral tissues; if prolonged, corals starve to death. One serious source of stress is global warming; when seawater temperatures exceed 1o C above local seasonal maxima, bleaching occurs. In 1980, massive bleaching was seen around the world; in the Indian Ocean 80% bleaching and 20% mortality occurred. Fortunately, some zooxanthellae are more heat tolerant than others, but climate models suggest that mass bleaching will become more and more common. Another major source of coral loss is disease, about which we still know very little in terms of pathogens. Some diseases have already had catastrophic effects. In the Caribbean, for example, two once dominant corals are now officially listed as endangered. Other stresses include destructive fishing, over-fishing (especially of herbivores), sedimentation (often caused by deforestation), predator explosions, storm damage, and now ocean acidification. Complete reproductive failure due to scarcity of mates is also a possibility. Studies of reefs across a gradient of human disturbance indicate that loss of resilience – the capacity to recover – is one of the first consequences of human impacts. Fortunately, actual extinctions are so far limited. Reefs can be thought of as canaries in the environmental coal mine, because they are so sensitive to a diverse array of human impacts, but all marine ecosystems are suffering. Business as usual is not an option if we are to address these problems.

    October 23rd at 12 noon
    Steve Piotrowicz, Oceanographer, NOAA Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR), presented "Argo - Observing the Ocean in Real-time."
    Abstract: In a period of less than 8 years the Argo Array of profiling floats has revolutionized the ability to observe the ocean, annually providing on the order of 100,000 high-quality profiles of upper (2000 m) ocean temperature and salinity, without temporal or spatial biases, free and openly to operational centers and the research community worldwide.

    October 30 at 12 noon

    Emily McDonald, Sea Grant Fellow, Office of Ocean Exploration & Research presented:
    APPLICATION OF OCEAN OBSERVING SYSTEMS IN AIDING PREDICTIVE WATER QUALITY MODELING IN LONG BAY, SOUTH CAROLINA
    Powerpoint slides (in ppt format)
    Abstract:
    Ocean observing systems are capable of providing data relevant to water quality modeling efforts along South Carolina’s beaches. Beach advisories protect public health but must be balanced with the area’s economic needs as well. There is a need by coastal managers to accurately determine when beach advisories for water quality should or should not be posted. Applying near-real time data from coastal ocean observing systems off the South Carolina coast to a simple Classification and Regression Tree (CART) model analysis allows for earlier and more accurate indicators of when bacterial counts reach unhealthy levels.

    Luis Leandro, Sea Grant Fellow, Office of Legislative Affairs presented:
    TROPHIC TRANSFER OF THE MARINE ALGAL BIOTOXIN DOMOIC ACID TO THE NORTH ATLANTIC RIGHT WHALE, EUBALAENA GLACIALIS
    Powerpoint slides (in pdf format)
    Abstract:
    In addition to ship strikes and fishing gear entanglements, recovery of the highly endangered North Atlantic right whale has been challenged by reproductive abnormalities and compromised health. Of the several factors hypothesized as contributing to the observed reproductive dysfunction in right whales, exposure to biotoxins produce by marine algae, such as domoic acid (DA), has received comparatively little consideration. This study assessed the occurrence of DA in right whales, their prey, and phytoplankton collected in the whales’ spring and summer feeding grounds. The results of this study confirm that right whales were exposed to DA for several months, likely through ingestion of their prey.

    15th Annual Library Book Fair on November 5 from 10-3
    Donations of used items and books are welcome for the NOAA Central Library Fifteenth Annual Book Fair and Flea Market. Please deliver donations to the NOAA Central Library, 2nd Floor, SSMC 3, or call 301-713-2607 X-122. Proceeds from the Flea Market will benefit the Friends of the NOAA Library, a tax-exempt charitable organization dedicated to support the library through acquisitions, preservation, and information dissemination.

    November 6 at 12 noon
    Sea Grant Fellows will present "How the Hill Works: Legislative Knauss Fellows Explain Congress"
    Presentation (pdf)

    November 19 at 12 noon
    Laura Oremland of NMFS/Office of Science and Technology will present "Sea Scallop Surveys in the 21st Century: Could advanced optical technologies ultimately replace the dredge-based survey?"

    Powerpoint slides (ppt format)

    Powerpoint slides (pdf format)

    Abstract:Atlantic Sea Scallops (Placopecten magellanicus), valued at $385 million (ex-vessel value) in 2007, support the top revenue generating commercial fishery in the United States. Found on the seafloor in Northwest Atlantic waters ranging from Newfoundland to North Carolina, they are typically harvested using a New Bedford style scallop dredge, that is dragged along the seafloor bottom by a fishing vessel. The Northeast Fisheries Science Center has been conducting sea scallop surveys aboard the R/V Albatross IV (and more recently the R/V Sharp) with a modified New Bedford style dredge annually since the late 1970s as a means to help estimate scallop population sizes and structure and provide management advice. In recent years however, optical survey methods using cameras to photograph and analyze scallop populations have emerged as a potential alternative to the dredge survey. One such optical survey method, Habcam, short for Habitat Mapping Camera System, was developed as a collaborative project between the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, the fishing industry, and the National Marine Fisheries Service. Habcam, unlike a dredge is non-invasive. It is towed above the seafloor by a commercial scallop boat and can collect as many as 300,000 high resolution images per day. In 2007, calibration experiments between the NMFS dredge survey and Habcam were conducted, in which sea scallop abundances and size class distributions were measured at the same stations by both dredge and Habcam surveys. This presentation will provide an overview of the different sea scallop survey methods and 2007 calibration experiment, as well as discuss preliminary results of the 2007 calibration experiments, with an examination of how optical and dredge survey methods compare, and the potential impacts measurement errors can have on optical survey methods.

    Lora Clarke (Office of Science and Technology, NMFS) will present "High Connectivity in a Locally Adapted Marine Fish Species: A possible scenario?"

    November 20 at 12 noon
    Knauss Sea Grant Fellows Lecture Series: Connectivity in Marine Fish Species (Postponed: Short-term Climate Variability Impact on Pacific Ocean SSTs talk by Sandy Lucas)
    Powerpoint slides (pdf format)
    Abstract: High connectivity, or the exchange of individuals among subpopulations, is assumed in most marine species due to life histories that include widely dispersive stages. However, evidence of local adaptation in marine species, such as the Atlantic silverside (Menidia menidia), raises questions concerning the degree of connectivity. Geochemical signatures of adult fish were compared to groundtruthed signatures of juvenile fish to determine natal origin. From this information, migration distances and the degree of mixing were estimated. Results suggest high connectivity and demonstrate marine species with largely open populations are capable of local adaptation despite apparently high gene flow.

    December 2 at 12 noon
    Dr. Richard Methot of NOAA Fisheries, Office of Science and Technology, will present "Stock Synthesis: an integrated analysis model to enable sustainable fisheries."

    Powerpoint slides

    Abstract:
    Integrated analysis is a powerful approach to statistical modeling of survey, catch, and biological data to estimate fish abundance and fishing mortality. The Stock Synthesis (SS) implementation of integrated analysis provides a high level of flexibility to adapt to a great diversity of assessment situations. The inner layer of SS is an age-structured population model which incorporates density-dependence in a spawner-recruitment relationship. The observation layer translates population estimates into expected values for the available data while taking into account various observation processes such as age determination imprecision and time-varying changes in catchability. The statistical layer then quantifies the goodness-of-fit between these expected values and the available data and searches for the set of parameters that maximizes this goodness-of-fit. The population model can also be extended past the last year of data to provide a forecast that is fully linked to the quantities estimated by the model. SS can be scaled down to mimic a simple biomass production model or scaled up to incorporate many complex factors such as multiple areas with movement, time-varying growth, and environmental effects on model parameters.

    December 4 at 12 noon
    Stephanie Showalter, Director of the National Sea Grant Law Center, will present "The National Sea Grant Law Center: Reducing Barriers and Conflicts through Legal Extension."

    Abstract: The National Sea Grant Law Center was established in 2002 to provide legal research, education, and outreach services to the National Sea Grant College Program and its constituents. Through a quarterly newsletter, a monthly e-mail case alert, and a bi-annual scholarly journal, the Law Center helps Sea Grant extension agents, coastal managers, and the general public stay informed of developing legal issues and recent court opinions. The Law Center's groundbreaking Advisory Service provides non-biased legal research and analysis to the Sea Grant, its partner agencies, and their constituents. Through its Advisory Service, the Law Center has informed the debate over ballast water regulation in the Great Lakes and water quality trading in Chesapeake Bay. The Law Center has increased understanding of and reduced opposition to coastal projects around the country by providing easy-to-understand information on the existing permitting and liability regimes. Current projects include an education and outreach project on offshore alternative energy siting and permitting and a symposium on water quantity. This presentation will provide an overview of the Law Center, its services, and recent projects.

    Bio: Stephanie Showalter received a B.A. in History from Penn State University and a joint J.D./Masters of Studies in Environmental Law degree from Vermont Law School. As Director for the Sea Grant Law Center, Stephanie advises Sea Grant constituents on ocean and coastal law issues, researches and publishes papers on natural resources, marine, and environmental law issues, and supervises law student research and writing projects. Her main areas of research include invasive species, aquaculture, and coastal development. Stephanie also teaches as an adjunct faculty member at the University of Mississippi School of Law offering courses such as ocean and coastal law, wetlands law and policy, and wildlife law.

    December 9 at 11:00 am - 1:00 pm
    The Library's Annual Holiday Brown Bag Extravaganza will feature:

    11:00-11:30: "Hunting Hurricanes -- Now and Then",
    featuring Dr. Rick Spinrad, Assistant Administrator NOAA Research, who will discuss his adventures while flying into Hurricane Ike aboard a NOAA P-3. He will be joined by Colonel James R. Cumberpatch (USAF Ret., USMA class 1944) who will share his experience of hunting down a hurricane in 1946 between Guam, the Phillipines and Okinawa after the Loran navigation in his B-29 bomber failed.

    Followed by the NOAA Holiday Band and Treats and Coffee!

    Hurricane Ike Powerpoint slides

    B-29/Guam Hurricane Powerpoint slides

    December 10 at 12 noon
    Gabe Vecchi, Research Scientist Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, will present "The Trifecta: Use of observations, theories, and models to predict hurricane activity."

    Powerpoint slides (in pdf format)

    Abstract:The relationship between sea surface temperature (SST) and Atlantic hurricane activity has been explored in several recent scientific publications and it has been the subject of much debate. A causal relationship between /absolute/ SST and Atlantic hurricanes implies a continued and dramatic increase in hurricane activity, and implies that the recent increase is partly man-made. A causal relationship between /relative/ SST and hurricane activity implies a future similar to the past (with big variability and small trend), but the recent increase cannot be attributed to human actions. This talk will show the importance of applying our dynamical understanding of tropical cyclones, in addition to the observed record, to address this question.

    Bio: Gabe has been a research oceanographer at NOAA's Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory in Princeton, N.J. since June of 2006. He was a visiting scientist at the lab from 2003 to 2006. His research interests include ocean-atmosphere coupling and climate change and variability. He earned his degrees from Rutgers University and the University of Washington and has won many awards for his work, including the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE) and a 2007 NOAA/OAR Outstanding Paper award.

    December 11 at 12 noon
    Laura Oremland of NMFS/Office of Science and Technology will present "NEMO and NOAA in Washington, D.C: How NOAA's Project "NEMO" led Washington, D.C. public school students to their first National Ocean Sciences Bowl competition"

    Abstract: On February 23, 2008, three teams of students from the District of Columbia Public Schools (DCPS) made history by becoming the first DCPS students to participate in a National Ocean Sciences Bowl (NOSB) competition. NOSB is a national academic competition for high school students in the ocean sciences. Each year thousands of students across the country take part in the competition but until recently, DCPS students had never participated. These DCPS students and their teachers were part of NOAA's pilot project "NEMO" designed to interest students in the ocean sciences and initiate DCPS participation in the NOSB program. NEMO is primarily an after school program that includes a weekly meeting between students and teachers (using activities provided by NOAA) and field trips opportunities coordinated by NOAA every other month. This presentation will provide an overview of NOAA's project NEMO, program evaluation methods and results, lessons learned on engaging inner city high schools in the ocean sciences and initiating their participation in a NOSB competition, and NEMO's future direction.

    December 18 from 12 noon - 1 p.m.
    Brandon Southall, Phd, Director, NOAA Ocean Acoustics Program, will present "Cetacean behavioral responses to simulated military sonar and other sound exposures"

    Powerpoint slides (in pdf format)

    Brief Description: A two-year study to study on how some marine mammals, including beaked whales, respond to various sounds, including simulated military sonar signals, was recently completed on an underwater listening range in the Bahamas. This project, called the Behavioral Response Study (BRS), was spearheaded by NOAA's Office of Science and Technology in collaboration with the U.S. Navy and scientists from several institutions and many countries. Diving and vocal behavior in four cetacean species was measured before, during, and after sound exposure to obtain measurements of how the animals react to human sounds in their environment.

    Abstract: Beaked whales have mass stranded during a few military exercises involving the transmission of active, mid-frequency tactical sonar, but the cause is unknown. A recent series of experiments on a specialized acoustic range [including 80+ elements capable of recording up to ~48 kHz covering ~600 sq. miles] were conducted in the Tongue of the Ocean (TOTO), Bahamas to provide empirical measurements of the behavioural responses of beaked whales and other odontocete cetaceans. A total of nine playback sequences (including measurements during "control" and "exposure" intervals) were conducted on four species of odontocete cetacean [Blainville's beaked whale, /Mesoplodon densirostris/ (n=2); Melon-headed whale, /Peponocephala electra/ (n=1); short-finned pilot whale, /Globicephala macrorhynchus/ (n=4); false killer whale, /Pseudorca crassidens/ (n=2)]. In addition, observations were made of odontocete vocalizations at a coarser (group) level using the hydrophone array during playback sequences. The results demonstrated that one of the tagged Blainville's beaked whales responded to playbacks of simulated naval sonar once the (gradually increasing) received levels (RL) reached 136 dB re: 1µPa and killer whale RL reached 102 dB re: 1µPa by interrupting foraging dives, prematurely ceasing vocalizations, and sustained avoidance of the playback area after exposure to the killer whale sounds. The other beaked whale playback included a single exposure to a pseudo-random noise signal of comparable level in the mid-frequency band; measurements of the response were limited by the premature disattachment of the tag, but there were some apparently similar responses in cessation of vocalizations and foraging. The other species tested appear to be categorically less sensitive to MFA and control sounds than beaked whales, demonstrating some changes in vocal and movement behaviour but nothing like the clear avoidance responses to relatively low-level sound exposures in the beaked whales. That beaked whales appear to have a particular sensitivity to acoustic exposure is not surprising, given their disproportionate occurrence in the stranding events that have apparently resulted from sonar training exercises. However, considerable uncertainty remains regarding the specificity of responses as a function of signal-type and context. Our results demonstrate that useful scientific information can be obtained through controlled exposure experiments on beaked whales and a range of other species without causing serious negative effects on the target or non-target species. Subsequent consideration is now on how best to optimize methodologies to increase sample sizes, expand the species tested, and integrate these results with complimentary opportunistic studies.

    2009 Brown Bags

    January 26 at 12 noon
    Michael J. McPhaden of NOAA's Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, Seattle, Washington, will present "Progress in Climate Science: NOAA's Tropical Moored Buoy Array Program"
    Powerpoint slides

    Abstract: NOAA's Tropical Moored Buoy Array Program is a coordinated, multi-national effort to implement a sustained moored buoy observing system in the global tropics for climate research and prediction. The array addresses NOAA Strategic Plan goal of "Understanding climate variability and change to enhance society's ability to plan and respond." This presentation will review the scientific background motivating development of the program, highlight progress in understanding and forecasting climate variability originating in the tropics, and describe plans for completing and sustaining the array.
    Bio: Curriculum Vitae

    January 27 at 12 noon
    Carlos Cotlier of the University of Rosario, Argentina, will present "Comparative evaluation between Feng Yun 1D, NOAA AVHRR, MODIS and LandSat 5 TM images working as a satellite constellation for burned areas detection on Paraná Medio Flooding Valley in Argentina."
    Powerpoint slides

    January 29 at 12 noon
    NOAA OAR Office of SeaGrant will host LSU researcher Dr. Jack Losso who will discuss "Oysters and Breast Cancer".

    Abstract: A compound in the fats found in Louisiana oysters could be a key ingredient in treating and preventing cancer according to LSU AgCenter food science researcher Dr. Jack Losso. Dr. Losso has found that ceramide found in oysters can restrict blood vessel growth and development of cancer cells in test tubes. It can also inhibit blood vessel growth in rats. By preventing the formation of blood vessels, called angiogenesis, the compound keeps cancer cells from multiplying because they can't grow without nutrients from the blood. Ceramide works on human breast cancer cells both in test tubes and in laboratory rats. When breast cancer cells come in contact with ceramide, they begin dying within 48-hours. These findings and other significant human health findings related to oysters will be presented at this seminar.

    February 4 from 10-12 EST and 1-3 EST - Endnote Training
    Doug Nguygen, Customer Education Specialist for Thomson Reuters, will present free Endnote training for NOAA staff and contractors who work full-time at a NOAA facility.

    Abstract: Endnote is a bibliographic management tool that allows researchers, students, and librarians to search online bibliographic databases, organize their references, images and PDFs, and create bibliographies and figure lists instantly. This class will cover all the basics of using Endnote, Endnote for Web, and using Endnote to insert and cite references as you type your paper. NOAA has a site-wide license for Endnote. To download Endnote, see NOAA NITES site.

    Registration is required:
    Send an email to Library.Reference@noaa.gov to reserve your spot in either the 10-12 session or the 1-3 session. Indicate if you will be attending in person or logging in to the webinar. If you are attending in person, the sessions will be held in the NOAA Central Library, SSMC#3, Room 2501.
    Remote access: The presentations will also be available remotely as a webinar. Registration is needed. Please send an email to Library.Reference@noaa.gov to register for the webinar. Indicate if you will be attending the 10-12 session or the 1-3 session. Information on how to access the webinar will be mailed to you in advance of the February 4 date.

    Class Syallabus:

    • Get acquainted with EndNote and learn about the user interface.
    • Learn four ways to add references to your library including manual data entry, online search, direct export, and importing text files downloaded from online sources
    • Cite While You Write in Microsoft Word
    • Edit citations to suppress author names, years, or both
    • Change styles instantly

    Note: This training is open only to NOAA employees or contractors who work full-time at a NOAA facility. To set up training and access to Endnote for your agency or organization, please contact:

    Doug Nguyen, Customer Education Specialist, ResearchSoft, Scientific Thomson Reuters, O: +1 415 344 3985
    doug.nguyen@thomsonreuters.com, thomsonreuters.com, scientific.thomsonreuters.com/researchsoftware

    February 11 from 12 noon - 1 pm
    Dr. David J. Newman, D.Phil., Chief, Natural Products Branch, National Cancer Institute, will present "National Cancer Institute's Marine Collection Programs: Problems, pratfalls and lessons learned."


    Powerpoint slides

    Abstract: The National Cancer Institute's Natural Products Branch (http://dtp.nci.nih.gov/branches/npb/index.html) located at Fort Detrick, Maryland, is a high-tech prospector for natural marine products which could help fight or cure cancer. Dr. Newman, a world leader in this line of investigation, will discuss the work of the Natural Products Branch which acquires crude natural materials from both terrestrial and marine environments, usually via competitive contracts world-wide, for extraction and screening of chemicals and compounds which could be of value in the fight against cancer. The responsibilities of his research branch include the selection and evaluation of the materials to be tested, and the procurement of large quantities of raw materials necessary to produce sufficient quantities of those active agents selected for preclinical and clinical evaluation.

    February 19 from 12 noon - 1 pm
    Steve Springer, Director of the Human Capital Planning Division, Corporate & Strategic Initiatives (CSI), of NOAA’s Workforce Management Office (WFMO), will present "Free Consulting Services – Resources and Solutions You Can Leverage to Enhance Your Organizational and Staff Effectiveness."
    Powerpoint presentation (ppt)

    Abstract: There are numerous questions NOAA managers must face when it comes to managing their staff:

    • How do I retain valuable employees?
    • How do I find the right candidates for open positions, or what kinds of employment programs are available to help me fill those positions?
    • What kind of employees, how many, and what skill sets will I need next year or perhaps in 5 to 10 years?
    • How can I most effectively and efficiently train my staff especially when they are in different locations?

    If you arent sure of the answers to these and other workforce-related questions, CSI can help. As part of its commitment to have the scientific, technical, and mission support expertise necessary to accomplish its mission, NOAAs Workforce Management Office established CSI. CSI employs internal consultants with a wide variety of specialized expertise areas like recruiting, workforce planning, competency modeling, instructor-led training, e-Learning, alternative dispute resolution, and instructional design. This presentation will provide an overview of the various services CSI provides and give NOAA managers the tools they need to develop, value and sustain a world-class workforce.

    Bio: Mr. Springer has over 20 years of experience in both the private and public sectors helping organizations use their most valuable resource, people, more effectively. He has worked as both an internal and an external consultant to a wide range of organizations including Fortune 100 companies, local and Federal public sector organizations, and national associations. His areas of expertise include performance management, competency modeling, career development, staffing, compensation/classification, and organizational development.

    Feb. 23 at 12 noon
    Dr. Lin H. Chambers, a physical scientist in the Climate Science Branch at the NASA Langley Research Center, will present "The CERES S'COOL Project: Bringing Cloud Science and Satellite Data to the K-12 Classroom.
    Powerpoint slides

    Abstract: This presentation will provide an introduction to the CERES S'COOL Project, a 12-year-old NASA K-12 education project which brings the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) project into schools to motivate authentic science experiences for students. The project emphasizes sky and weather observations, introduces remote sensing and validation, and involves students as part of the CERES research team.

    Bio: Dr. Lin H. Chambers - Dr. Chambers is a physical scientist in the Climate Science Branch at the NASA Langley Research Center. She received her Ph.D. in Aerospace Engineering from North Carolina State University in 1991. Dr. Chambers has worked in a variety of radiative transfer applications, including nonequilibrium flows and cloud inhomogeneity effects. She is a member of the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) Science Team. Research activities have focussed on assessing the effect of inhomogenous clouds on satellite remote sensing and cloud/radiation parameterizations, as well as on better understanding the radiative properties of Tropical cloud systems.

    Dr. Chambers is also director of the outreach component of the CERES effort, the Students' Cloud Observations On-Line (S'COOL) Project, and she was the Contrail Scientist for the GLOBE program. She leads the MY NASA DATA project at the Langley Atmospheric Science Data Ceter to make real NASA earth-observing data accessible to the K-12 and citizen science community.

    Feb. 26 at 12 noon
    Three NOAA Coral Managemeant Fellows who are working on Coral Management issues in American Samoa, CNMI and Guam, will present talks abouttheir work and projects in the islands.

    Thursday, February 26 at 12 noon: Three of NOAA's Coral Management Fellows from the Pacific will be giving a lecture about their program-supported environmental work in the region.

    Kathleen M. Herrmann will present "Conservation Action Plans in CNMI."
    Abstract: Ms. Herrmann has facilitated the completion of a Conservation Action Plan for Laolao Bay and is working with agency staff to implement the plan. She is facilitating a capacity building training for local staff to design and implement socioeconomic monitoring in Laolao Bay. She has also facilitated the Talakhaya Watershed Restoration project; a multiagency partnership which in 2008 planted 31,473 seedlings, employed 25 community members through the Luta Livelihoods Initiative, and has documented statistically significant improvement on adjacent coral reefs.
    Powerpoint slides

    Alyssa Edwards will present "American Samoa Population Growth and its Impacts on Coastal Resources."
    Abstract: An ecological treasure in the South Pacific, the U.S. Territory of American Samoa consists of five volcanic islands, plus two atolls, all of which are surrounded by fringes of coral reefs. American Samoa is the only jurisdiction to identify population pressure as a key threat to local coral reefs. NOAA Coral Reef Management Fellow Alyssa Edwards is currently working with the government's Coral Reef Advisory Group to identify ways of reducing rapid population growth and its impact on coastal resources.
    Powerpoint slides

    Elaina Todd will present "RARE Pride Environmental Campaign in Guam"
    Abstract: Elaina works with the Guam Coastal Management Program where she coordinated the Guam Year of the Reef, planning a recreational user stewardship workshop, coral bleaching training, children’s snorkeling & educational fair and the grand finale event including a free screening of the 11th hour, a reef stewardship awards ceremony and movie in the park for kids! She is currently training at Georgetown University to launch a Rare Pride campaign focused on conserving Guam’s coral reefs.
    Powerpoint slides

    March 11 from 11:30 AM to 1:00 PM
    Dr. Kirk Bergstrom will present the NSF-funded "Interactive Earth: Tools for Earth System Science" program and the preview the new PBS special "Nourish". He will also discuss an upcoming project "Education for the Green Economy."

    Bio: Dr. Kirk Bergstrom is founder and President of WorldLink, a media and education group based in San Francisco, California. In this capacity, he has directed special projects for the National Science Foundation, PBS, Walt Disney Imagineering, State of the World Forum, California Science Center, and Tech Museum of Innovation. Recently, Kirk completed production on a new PBS special entitled Nourish: Food + Community which explores the possibilities of a sustainable food system. He also directed the award-winning PBS program Power Shift: Energy + Sustainability and a companion traveling exhibit. Kirk received two national Emmy Awards for his film Spaceship Earth: Our Global Environment.

    Dr. Bergstrom also serves as principal investigator of a NSF-funded project entitled Interactive Earth: Tools for Earth System Science. A digital mapping tool, the program includes more than 100 global data sets and an interdisciplinary curriculum organized around real-world issues. He also designed the Eye on Earth multimedia exhibit that explores the art and science of remote sensing.

    Kirk’s work in interactive media originated in 1982 with the critically acclaimed Los Angeles TeleVote, one of the first large-scale experimentsin teledemocracy. In 1985, he was invited by Walt Disney Imagineering to participate in designing future interactive facilities and exhibits for the EPCOT theme park in Florida. From 1992-96, Kirk served as Executive Director of the Global Youth Summit, a week-long educational program that brings together young leaders from around the world. Convened in Rio de Janeiro during the 1992 Earth Summit and later in San Francisco as part of the State of the World Forum, the Global Youth Summit has served youth from over 40 nations.

    Kirk earned a B.A. degree in Cinema Production from the University of Southern California and a M.A. in Futures Studies from the University of Hawaii. He received his Doctorate in Education from the University of San Francisco.

    March 12 at 12 noon
    John C. Bortniak (Commander NOAA Corps (Retired), will present "Recollections on Wintering Over at The South Pole 1979 on The 30 Year Anniversary." The seminar is part of the
    NODC International Polar Year (IPY) Seminar Series (http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#IPYSeminars).

    March 17 at 11-12 and 1:30-2:30
    An Overview of How to Use Lexis-Nexis will be offered to NOAA staff in Silver Spring and remotely via webinar by Mairin Van Shura, Esq., Government Consultant, Lexis-Nexis.
    Two identical sessions are offered: 11 am to noon session and 1:30 to 2:30 session. You may bring your lunch.
    Please register for the training by sending an email to Library.Reference@noaa.gov.
    Indicate your name, email, phone number, NOAA office, preference for in-person or webinar.
    For in-person attendees, the seminar will be in SSMC#3, 2nd floor, 2501. For webinar attendees, you will recieve an email with a GoToMeeting invitation the day prior to the training.

    Lexis-Nexis is a global information service providing access to thousands of news, legislative, business and legal information sources. Includes major newspapers, law journals, international news, intellectual property records, industry and market reports, and more. Available for NOAA staff in Silver Spring via www.nexis.com. Available to all NOAA staff outside Silver Spring via user id and password. Contact your NOAA Library for more information. Contact Library.Reference@noaa.gov if you are a patron of the NOAA Central Library. For a list of NOAA libraries see http://www.lib.noaa.gov/about/lib_network.html.

    March 18 at 12 noon
    Kathy Crane (NOAA Arctic Research office, Climate Program Office), will present "Collaborative NOAA-Russia Ocean Observations in The Bering and Chukchi Seas (tentative)." The seminar is part of the
    NODC International Polar Year (IPY) Seminar Series (http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#IPYSeminars).

    March 19 at 12 noon
    Stephane Vrignaud, NOAA Fisheries Service Liaison to the European Union, and Tom Asakawa, NOAA Fisheries Service Liaison, will present "International Fisheries Trade Trends".
    Exporting Seafood to the European Union Powerpoint slides
    Us Exports to NE Asia Powerpoint slides

    Abstract: Illegal, Unreported, Unregulated - How these fishing practices can affect the seafood you consume NOAA Fisheries Service international trade experts speak on this and other U.S. seafood fisheries management issues.

    POSTPONED: March 25 at 12 noon
    Dr. John Walsh, Professor of Climate Change and chief scientist at the International Arctic Research Center at the University of Alaska, Fairbanks, will present a seminar on Arctic modeling from a systems perspective. The seminar is part of the NODC International Polar Year (IPY) Seminar Series (http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#IPYSeminars).

    Abstract: Observations of different parts of the Arctic system present a coherent picture of change over the past half century. The climate models used to project future changes capture the past variations to varying degrees Here we survey the performance of global climate models in simulating Arctic climate, with particular attention to simulations of the seasonal cycle, natural variations and greenhouse-driven changes. The role of low-frequency variations in confounding future projections will be given special attention, as will the impacts of deficiencies in model simulations of sea ice and the Arctic terrestrial surface. We will then address the downscaling of Arctic climate simulations by presenting the results of initial attempts to produce high-resolution scenarios of climate change for Alaska.
    Remote access

    March 26 at 12 noon
    Troy W. Hartley, Ph.D., Virginia Sea Grant Director, Virginia Institute of Marine Science, College of William & Mary will present "The Hope for Integrated Management: Network governance in fisheries and watershed management."
    Powerpoint slides
    Remote access:
    Audio: 866-631-5469, passcode: 3958086; slides available at http://www.lib.noaa.gov/about/news/brownbagseminars.html.

    Abstract: Increasingly, coastal and marine resource managers are asked to enhance communication, coordination and integration across ecological, jurisdictional, and sector boundaries. But was would such integrated, ecosystem-based management look like in operation? How do we implement integrated management across the watershed-estuary-ocean divide? This research employs communication network analysis methods to examine the governance networks underlying cases of collaborative watershed planning and Atlantic herring fisheries management. Specifically, the focus is on the extent of collaboration, roles of network leaders and managers, and the enhancement potential of the existing networks. Ramifications for integrated, ecosystem-based management are discussed.

    Bio: Troy Hartley is a Research Associate Professor in coastal and marine policy and the Director of Virginia Sea Grant at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science (VIMS). Dr. Hartley's research interests are in coastal, marine and fisheries policy and management, specifically in the communication networks and stakeholder processes underlying integrated planning and management, adaptive management, collaborative management, ecosystem-based management, and other forms of governance networks.

    April 3 at 12 noon
    Dr. Yi Ming of NOAA's Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Lab will present "Formation and Climate Impacts of Arctic Haze."

    Abstract: Arctic climate is changing at a pace faster than the global average in the recent decades. Arctic haze - an accumulation of long-range transported aerosols - exerts substantial surface warming in winter by interacting with clouds. The formation of Arctic haze and its influence on local climate are poorly understood. Here we find, with the help of a state-of-the-art global climate model, that the poleward transport of European air pollution is controlled strongly by the second climate mode of the North Atlantic - European region. This is supported by the strong correlation of measured surface aerosol concentrations and longwave downward radiative flux with the second mode. A shift of the mode from negative to positive phases doubles the abundance of Arctic haze. This finding is essential for understanding Arctic climate variability and change. The seminar is part of the NODC International Polar Year (IPY) Seminar Series (http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#IPYSeminars).

    April 2 from 11:30 am - 12:30 pm
    "Tips on improving your resume" presented by Charly L. Wells, Director of NOAA Office of Equal Opportunity and Diversity Management For all employees who are interested to learn more about those tips that improve their resumes.
    Presentation notes

    Bio: Mr. Wells is an ex-marine who has been a Federal employee for 37 years. For the past 31 years, he has worked exclusively in the Equal Employment Opportunity and Diversity Management arena. Mr. Wells studied at the University of Hawaii, Chaminade, where he received his B.S. degree in Political Science. Mr. Wells has been involved in many aspects of the Federal EEO Program and the Diversity Management process (e.g. EEO Counseling, Investigations, Complaint Adjudication, FEORP, Affirmative Employment Programs, Disability issues, (Reasonable Accommodations, Accessibility, etc.), Community Outreach, Special Emphasis Programs, Student Programs, Upward Mobility, EEO and Diversity Management Training, and development of online EEO and Diversity Management training.

    April 8 at 11:30 AM
    Shirl Desormeaux, a Department of Credit Union employee will present the seminar "Sound Retirement Planning."

    April 15 at 12 noon
    Dr. Igor Krupnik, Smithsonian Institution, will present "IPY and Indigenous People: Local Knowledge Contributes to the Study of Arctic Change." The seminar is part of the NODC International Polar Year (IPY) Seminar Series (http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#IPYSeminars).

    April 21 at 12 noon
    Eric Hackathorn, NOAA's Virtual Program Manager, will present on "Virtual Alaska".

    April 22 at 12 noon
    Ivy Washington, Employee Development Program Manager, Learning Resources Division, NOAA Workforce Management Office, will present "Individual Development Plans and Career Planning."

    April 23 - Bring a Child to Work Day

    April 28 at 12 noon
    Dr. Tom Miller and Dr. Mike Wilberg, Assistant Professors of Fisheries Science at the Center for Environmental Science, University of Maryland, will present "Project FishSmart: A stakeholder-centered approach to improve fisheries conservation and management."


    Powerpoint slides

    Abstract: Despite increasing dissatisfaction among many stakeholder groups, fisheries management often does not allow for a meaningful exchange of information and ideas between stakeholders and managers. Stakeholders in several prominent U.S. fisheries have been frustrated by a perceived lack of inclusion of their views in fishery management decisions, which has led to distrust of management and the potential for problems with compliance. Our objective was to develop a process that allowed stakeholders to develop recommendations to 1) improve the fishery through voluntary measures and 2) provide management recommendations that they supported. We developed a “stakeholder-centered” process that allowed stakeholders to evaluate how well alternative options could achieve their goals using a decision analysis model. The first application of this collaborative process was to the king mackerel (Scomberomorus cavalla) fishery off the southeastern Atlantic coast of the U.S. The stakeholder workgroup developed objectives for the fishery, performance measures to guage whether objectives were reached, and options that could be used to reach the objectives. Objectives included traditional and non-traditional goals such as maintaining high and stable catches and retaining the ability to catch large fish, and options included both voluntary changes in fishing practices (e.g., adoption of techniques that reduce catch and release mortality) and mandatory regulations (e.g., size limits or bag limits). Through an iterative process, stakeholders assisted in developing a model to allow them to compare how well their options met their vision for a quality fishery. The workgroup developed a consensus suite of recommendations, including more conservative length and bag limits than those recommended by the Council’s Scientific and Statistical Committee, based on the results of the decision analysis. The immersion of stakeholders in the available science and model development and evaluation eventually led to recognition that more conservative management was necessary to achieve their objectives. This project demonstrated that stakeholders can be included in a meaningful participatory process that can improve fisheries management, but inclusion requires increased time and an effort to provide science without jargon or condescension.

    Bios: Tom Miller is a Professor of fisheries science at the Chesapeake Biological Laboratory, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science. Dr. Miller's research focuses on a range of fisheries topics including fisheries ecology with emphasis on early life history, population dynamics and stock assessment, and quantitative methods in ecology with emphasis on modeling, and experimental design and statistics. Mike Wilberg is a Professor of fisheries science at the Chesapeake Biological Laboratory, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science. Dr. Wilberg's research focuses on fisheries management, development and evaluation of stock assessment methods, fisheries population dynamics, decision analysis, survey design, and statistical estimation and modeling in ecology.

    April 29 at 12 noon
    Briefing by the Pacific Risk Management Ohana (PRiMO) team: Adam Stein, PRIMO Executive Director, Penny Larin, PRIMO Coordinator, Kristina Kekuewa, Deputy Director. PRIMO is made up of multi-agency partners, including NWS, NESDIS, NOS, and NMFS. Hosted by NOAA Pacific Services Center.

    Powerpoint slides

    April 30 at 12 noon
    Dr. Kelly K. Falkner (Program Director, Antarctic Integrated System Science, Office of Polar Programs, National Science Foundation, will present "The Antarctic Integrated System Science on the Antarctic Peninsula." The seminar is part of the NODC International Polar Year (IPY) Seminar Series (http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#IPYSeminars).

    April 30 from 2:00 - 3:15 pm
    Learn how to use these journal article databases: Aquatic Science and Fisheries Abstracts, Toxline, Meteorological and Geoastrophysical Abstracts, Oceanic Abstracts, Water Resources Abstract, Conference Papers Index, and BioOne Abstracts and Indexes.
    Training will be available via webinar and in-person in NOAA Central Library, SSMC#3, 2501. Please register by sending an email to Library.Reference@noaa.gov. Indicate preference for in-person attendance or webinar.

    May 4 at 12 noon
    Arlene Blum will present "The Fire Retardant Dilemma: Fire Safety, Human Health and the Global Environment."

    Powerpoint slides


    Abstract: Arlene Blum, a biophysical chemist, carried out research in the 1970s that contributed to removing brominated and chlorinated tris, cancer-causing flame retardants, from children's sleepwear. Chemicals such as tris can cause neurological and reproductive impairments, thyroid abnormalities, endocrine disruption, and/or cancer. They often bio- accumulate up the food chain and persist in humans, wild animals, and the environment. Blum will describe her interdisciplinary research and policy work to protect health and the environment while maintaining fire safety. Currently, Blum is working with a global team of scientists and NGOs to stop hundreds of millions of pounds of unneeded toxic fire retardant chemicals being added to consumer products worldwide. If time permits, Arlene Blum will share also dramatic images and stories from her historic mountaineering expeditions and will relate how her climbing career led to her current work in environmental health and public policy.

    May 5 at 12 noon
    George R. Cutter of NOAA's Southwest Fisheries Science Center will present "High-resolution bathymetric mapping with the new broad-bandwidth, split-beam, scientific, multibeam sonar installed on the new NOAA FSVs."

    Abstract: The Simrad ME70 is a new multibeam-echosounder system that was designed for quantitative fisheries research and is installed on each of the new, acoustically-quiet, NOAA Fisheries survey vessels (FSVs). The ME70 has configurable beams and transmits in the range of 70-120 kHz to provide calibrated, acoustic backscattering data throughout the detection range (Fisheries Mode). With hardware and software add-ons, the ME70 can also collect soundings that are expected to meet IHO S-44 Order 1 standards (Bathymetric Mode). Furthermore, with custom algorithms and software, bathymetric data can be obtained from the ME70 operating in Fisheries Mode, and volume backscatter can be sampled from the ME70 operating in Bathymetric Mode. This flexibility may allow data to be concurrently and efficiently collected on fish and their seabed habitat. Here, we describe a method to process the echo amplitude and phase data from multiple split-beams formed in Fisheries Mode to estimate seabed range, slope, roughness, and normalized surface scattering strength (a hardness metric). We compare the resulting bathymetry to that collected with the ME70 operating in Bathymetric Mode in the same area of the Bay of Biscay. (Authors for this paper include: George R. Cutter, David A. Demer (NOAA's Southwest Fisheries Science Center) and Laurent Berger (IFREMER, France).

    May 6 at 12 noon
    Dan Seidov, PhD and Igor Smolyar, PhD, of NOAA's NODC Ocean Climate Laboratory, will present "Barents Sea Warming." The seminar is part of the NOAA International Polar Year (IPY) Seminar Series NODC International Polar Year (IPY) Seminar Series

    May 7 at 12 noon
    Jon Kurland (NOAA Fisheries, Alaska Region) and Mike Sigler (NOAA Fisheries, Alaska Fisheries Science Center) will present "NOAA's Role in the Science and Management of Arctic Fish and Marine Mammals." The seminar is part of the NOAA International Polar Year (IPY) Seminar Series NODC International Polar Year (IPY) Seminar Series
    Abstract: NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service is actively involved in a variety of research and management activities related to the conservation of Arctic fish and marine mammal populations. NOAA Fisheries' Alaska Regional Office and Alaska Fisheries Science Center have been involved in Arctic projects for many years, but the scope and breadth of our work in the Arctic has expanded substantially in the past few years and will continue to grow with climate change. This presentation will provide an overview of NOAA Fisheries' current science and management activities in the Arctic as we begin addressing the consequences of climate change and the associated loss of sea ice, and as we prepare for the resource management challenges that lie ahead.

    May 14 from 11:30-12 and 1-1:30
    Book Signing!!! NOAA's Teacher at Sea Program is pleased to announce the release of its fourth and final book of its series. Written at the middle school level, "Mr. Tanenbaum Explores Atlantic Fisheries" on the NOAA Ship Henry B. Bigelow, is filled with fun and exciting facts about fisheries research. To celebrate the release, we are happy to have the authors, Dr. Diane Stanitski and CDR John Adler, as well as illustrator Bruce Cowden, here to sign books. The book signing will be held in the NOAA Library on Thursday, May 14th from 11:30-12:00 and from 1:00 - 1:30. There is no cost for the book.

    May 14 at 12 noon (originally scheduled for March 25)
    Dr. John Walsh, Professor of Climate Change and chief scientist at the International Arctic Research Center at the University of Alaska, Fairbanks, will present a seminar on Arctic modeling from a systems perspective. The seminar is part of the NODC International Polar Year (IPY) Seminar Series (http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#IPYSeminars).
    Abstract: Observations of different parts of the Arctic system present a coherent picture of change over the past half century. The climate models used to project future changes capture the past variations to varying degrees Here we survey the performance of global climate models in simulating Arctic climate, with particular attention to simulations of the seasonal cycle, natural variations and greenhouse-driven changes. The role of low-frequency variations in confounding future projections will be given special attention, as will the impacts of deficiencies in model simulations of sea ice and the Arctic terrestrial surface. We will then address the downscaling of Arctic climate simulations by presenting the results of initial attempts to produce high-resolution scenarios of climate change for Alaska.
    Remote access

    May 19 at 12 noon
    Drs. Linwood Pendleton (Senior Fellow, The Ocean Foundation and Director of the Coastal Ocean Values Center ) and David K. Loomis (University of Massachusetts Amherst, Director of the Human Dimensions of Marine and Coastal Ecosystem Program), will present "Measuring the Effects of Coastal Restoration on Coastal Uses." Hosted by NOAA Fisheries, Office of Habitat Conservation.

    Powerpoint presentation - Loomis
    Powerpoint presentation - Pendleton


    Abstract: Many studies have used valuation techniques to predict the potential effect of coastal restoration on human uses, but few provide empirical evidence that restoration indeed affects the way people use and perceive the coast. We take two approaches to examining how coastal restoration affects uses and perception.

    May 21 at 10 am in the NOAA Science Center
    Larry Schweiger, President of the National Wildlife Foundation, and Dr. Amanda Stoudt, a member of the NWF staff, will present "Safeguarding Fish, Wildlife, and Natural Systems in the Face of Climate Change: A New Era for Conservation." The call-in information for this seminar is
    1-888-790-2029
    Access code: 60987

    Abstract: The unprecedented challenge that climate change poses to fish, wildlife, and natural systems has led to an ongoing transformation of the conservation agenda. This seminar will provide an overview of efforts within the conservation community to reorient their mission, show some practical examples of how natural resources adaptation to climate change is taking place on the ground, and share an update on relevant federal legislation. In addition, opportunities for NOAA and other federal agencies to partner with non-governmental organizations will be discussed, highlighting in particular how NGOs can help make connections with grassroot constituencies and governments at the state and local levels. This seminar is co-hosted with the NWS Office of Hydrologic Development.

    May 21 at 12 noon
    Albert E Theberge Jr, of the NOAA Central Library, will present "Seeing into the Sea: How the Seafloor Was Discovered." The call-in information for this seminar is
    1-866-631-5479
    Access code: 39580806

    Powerpoint Slides

    Abstract: Up until about 160 years ago, the surface of the 70% of our planet covered by water was totally unknown except for small areas bordering the fringes of most continents. Since that time there has been an explosion of knowledge concerning our view of the seafloor. Many individuals and organizations were responsible for this. This presentation will introduce some of the significant individuals and their accomplishments in the history of seafloor mapping. It will also track the evolution of seafloor mapping technologies and how they influenced our view of planet Earth.

    May 27 at 12 noon
    Dr. Taneil Uttal, NOAA Earth Systems Research Laboratory, will present a seminar as part of the NODC International Polar Year (IPY) Seminar Series (http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#IPYSeminars).

    May 28 at 12 noon
    Dr. John Cloud, of the NOAA Central Library, will present on "NOAA work in the high latitudes and the International Polar Year 2007-2008 seminar series." The seminar is part of the NODC International Polar Year (IPY) Seminar Series (http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#IPYSeminars).

    May 20 at 12 noon
    Bob Bailey, Oregon Coastal Program Manager, will present "Ocean Resources Management and Marine Spatial Planning for Wave Energy and Marine Reserves in Oregon," Hosted by NOAA Office of Coastal and Resource Management, Coastal Programs Divisions.

    Powerpoint slides (pdf format)

    Abstract: Although the state of Oregon has had an ocean resources management program for more than 20 years, recent events have converged to drive new program activities and create synergies to solve ocean management problems that are expanding the state's ocean management capacity and reach. Bob Bailey, Oregon Coastal Program Manager, will discuss current ocean planning work on marine reserve designations, ocean wave energy development proposals, the West Coast Governors Agreement on Ocean Health, and initiatives with coastal fishermen, local governments, NGOs, universities, and state and federal agencies to apply science, marine spatial databases, and GIS capacity to problems of ocean management. Along the way he will discuss the key roles of various NOAA programs ...as well as blind luck and good timing(!)...in moving these issues forward.

    May 29 at 12 noon
    Dr. Pablo Clemente of the National Snow and Ice Data Center, will present a seminar as part of the NODC International Polar Year (IPY) Seminar Series (http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#IPYSeminars).

    June 3 at 12 noon
    Seminar by Marcia Brown, Vinaya Swaminathan and Lou Ann Dietz from the Foundations of Success-University of Maryland Course in Adaptive Management for Conservation Projects.
    Powerpoint slides (in pdf)

    Abstract: Foundations of Success (FOS) is a non-profit organization whose mission is to improve the practice of conservation through Adaptive Management - working with practitioners to test assumptions, adapt, and learn. The University of Maryland's Master's Program in Sustainable Development and Conservation Biology (CONS) provides students with the multidisciplinary, conceptual and experiential learning experience necessary to address the biodiversity crisis that now faces the planet. This presentation will provide an overview of Adaptive Management and will introduce attendees to FOS's 2009 training program, Adaptive Management for Conservation. The content of this training program follows the steps of the Conservation Measures Partnership's Open Standards for the Practice of Conservation, which are quickly becoming an industry standard.

    June 4 at 12 noon
    Ms. Peggy Leung, Deputy Director for the Office of Training and Knowledge Management (OTKM), Department of Commerce, will present "E-Learning: Anytime, Anywhere".

    June 5 at 12 noon
    Mr. Doug Nguyen from Thomson Reuters will conduct a seminar on how to use Endnote, Endnote Web, and Reference Manager, software tools for publishing and managing bibliographies on the Windows and Macintosh desktop. Using these products, writers save countless hours of typing and interpreting style requirements when creating bibliographies for curricula vitae, manuscripts, thesis/dissertations, grant proposals, reports and other publications. EndNote Web is a Web-based tool for managing and citing references in papers and creating bibliographies. Integrated seamlessly with EndNote desktop and the ISI Web of Knowledge research platform, EndNote Web provides an online collaborative environment for EndNote users. NOAA has an agency-wide site license for these products. For information on how to download these applications, visit the NOAA IT Electronic Store (NITES) web site's "NOAA Site License with ISI ResearchSoft for Bibliographic Management Tools" page: http://www.nites.noaa.gov/bpa/display.asp?bpaID=6. REMOTE ACCESS via WEBINAR will be provided for this library instruction seminar:

    June 8 at 12 noon
    Dr. Elliott Norse, President and Founder of Marine Conservation Biology Institution, will present "The End of the Blue Frontier: Managing Places in the Sea".
    Powerpoint slides (in pdf)
    Abstract: Dr. Norse received his Ph.D. in marine ecology, and since 1978 he's focused on environmental policy at the US Environmental Protection Agency, White House Council on Environmental Quality, Ecological Society of America, The Wilderness Society, and Ocean Conservancy. MCBI is a conservation advocacy organization focusing on ecosystem-based management including marine reserves, destructive fishing methods and ocean zoning as ways to protect, recover and sustainably use places in the sea. Elliott's 140+ publications include Global Marine Biological Diversity: A Strategy for Building Conservation into Decision Making (1993), Marine Conservation Biology: The Science of Maintaining the Sea’s Biodiversity (2005), "Resolving mismatches in U.S. ocean governance" in Science (2006) and "Essential ecological insights for marine ecosystem-based management and marine spatial planning" in Marine Policy (2008). He's a Pew Fellow in Marine Conservation and recipient of NOAA's Nancy Foster Award for Habitat Conservation. The seminar is hosted by NOAA OAR Office of Communications.

    June 9 at 12 noon
    Charles Stock, a research oceangrapher with NOAA's Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL), will present "From Phytoplankton to Fish: Global Patterns in the Energy Flow through Marine Ecosystems." GFDL's joint institute is hosting a workshop with NMFS and the larger community of fisheries and climate scientists in mid-June, to see how global climate models can help fisheries management.

    Powerpoint slides (in pdf)

    Abstract: Predicting the impact of climate change on higher trophic levels in marine ecosystems (e.g., fisheries) is hampered by uncertainties in the factors controlling the propagation of primary production through the marine food web. A marine ecosystem model and two compilations of observed and derived phytoplankton and mesozooplankton productivity estimates are thus used to diagnose the factors controlling global patterns in the ratio of mesozooplankton productivity to primary productivity (referred to as the z-ratio). Results suggest a modest yet significant (/r/ = 0.4) increasing trend in /z/-ratios with productivity, from values of ~0.01-0.04 in the oligotrophic sub-tropical gyres to >0.1 in highly productive upwelling regions. Two mechanisms were responsible: 1) zooplankton gross growth efficiencies increased as ingestion rates far exceeded basal metabolic costs in productive regions; and 2) the increasing dominance of large phytoplankton in such systems shortened the trophic distance between primary producers and mesozooplankton. Results suggest that climate-driven changes in primary production may be amplified at higher trophic levels.

    June 10 at 12 noon
    Teresa Turk, NOAA Fisheries, Office of Science and Technology, Office of International Affairs, will present "Capacity Building and Partnerships in West Africa."

    Powerpoint slides (in pdf)

    Abstract: The 2007 Magnuson-Stevens Act calls on the United States to promote improved monitoring, control, and surveillance for high seas and Regional Fisheries Management Organization (RFMO) fisheries; improve the effectiveness of RFMOs through adoption of IUU vessel lists, stronger port state controls, and market-related measures; and build capacity in other countries to ensure sustainable fisheries and regulatory enforcement. To further NOAA Fisheries Service efforts in Africa, we have been collaborating with the U.S. Navy's African Partnership Station (APS) to improve maritime safety, security, and resource stewardship. We participated in an on-board, fisheries-focused reception in Senegal in 2007, including a speech by a representative of the Senegalese Ministry of Fisheries on the importance of fisheries to maritime security in the region. In early April 2008, NOAA Fisheries coordinated a 10 day observer training workshop on board APS vessel, HSV2 Swift, in Tema, Ghana. We worked with the Ghanaian Ministry of Fisheries to offer a training program for up to 35 fishery observers. The program trained observers to improve the ways they collect data for scientific research and monitoring of fish stocks and bycatch within domestic and international fisheries. NOAA Fisheries also provided Ghana with safety and scientific equipment for use by observers while performing their duties. In February 2009, NOAA Fisheries in coordination with the Ministry of Fisheries Senegal and through the US Navy's APS, USS Nashville, provided a second observer training to 40 Senegalese observers and several interested NGO's and university students. The presentation will discuss these ongoing activities and future plans for a coordinated engagement working with a variety of partners dedicated to improving fisheries management and combating IUU fishing in West Africa.
    Bio: Teresa Turk is a fisheries biologist with NOAA Fisheries, Office of International Affairs and serves as the coordinator for international observer programs and capacity building projects in W. Africa. She also works for the Office of Science and Technology, National Observer Program and serves as the National Coordinator for the development of the Fisheries Scientific Computing System (FSCS). She received her B.S. in Zoology and M.A. in Anthropology from the University of Arkansas and her M.S. in Fisheries Science from the University of Washington. She has been working toward improving observer programs for the past 20 years. Most recently, she has been actively engaged in assisting the International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas (ICCAT) efforts to develop and implement a regional observer program for transshipment vessels in the Atlantic Ocean and coordinating the development of international observer training for West Africa.

    June 17 at 12 noon
    Presentation by Dr. Jackie M. Grebmeier, Assistant Professor Evolutionary Bioinformatics, University of Tennessee. This seminar is part of the NODC International Polar Year (IPY) Seminar Series (http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#IPYSeminars).
    Dr. Grebmeier is a research professor at the Chesapeake Biological Laboratory. Her research interests are related to pelagic-benthic coupling, benthic carbon cycling, and benthic faunal population structure in the marine environment. Over the last 20 years, her field research program in both the Arctic and Antarctic has focused on such topics as understanding how water column processes influence biological productivity in Arctic waters and sediments, how materials are exchanged between the sea bed and overlying waters, and documenting longer-term trends in ecosystem health of Arctic continental shelves.

    June 18 at 12 noon
    David B. MacNeill, Fisheries Specialist, New York Sea Grant, SUNY College at Oswego, Oswego, New York andPaul R. Bowser, Professor of Aquatic Animal Medicine, Aquatic Animal Health Program, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, will present "NY Sea Grant's Proactive Research and Extension Responses to Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia (VHS)."

    Powerpoint Slides (pdf format)

    Abstract: Historically, Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia (VHS) has been described as one of the most devastating fish diseases on a worldwide basis and has decimated fresh-water reared rainbow trout in the European continent for many years. Disease events known as early as the 1930's were thought to have a viral cause (a viral etiology), but it was not until the early 1960's when the techniques of fish cell culture became available, that the virus was cultured and proven as the cause of Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia. A major event in the history of VHS occurred in 1988 and 1989 when VHSV was isolated from apparently normal returning sea-run chinook and coho salmon in the Puget Sound area of Washington State in the Pacific Northwest of the United States. Discovery of VHSV in marine fish made the fish health community think of VHSV as a pathogen of marine fish that somehow moved into the freshwater trout culture facilities of Europe in the 1930's. The emergence of VHSV in the Great Lakes Basin of North America in 2005 marked another major milestone in the history of this virus and the disease it causes. Of additional concern is the fact that VHSV has also been isolated from Atlantic herring, Striped bass and mummichog in the Northwest Atlantic (Gulf of Maine, Bay of Fundy). These isolations revealed the presence of a virus that was genetically most closely related to the Pacific Northwest genotype. This discovery presents a potential a risk to Atlantic species, in that the no one knows the relative susceptibility of these species to infection and possible losses due to disease from VHSV. As a pathogen that is listed by the OIE (World Organization for Animal Health) as reportable, the finding of VHSV in these new locations has significant trade implications on a national and international level and has already demonstrated economic impacts to bait dealers, and commercial fish processors in the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River.

    In response to the discovery of a freshwater form of VHSV in the Great Lakes and a Pacific genotype in Northwest Atlantic, New York Sea Grant proactively and effectively responded to the issue through sponsored research integrated with extension outreach on a statewide, regional and national scale. These efforts include pioneering research on VHS diagnostics, technical/policy discussions with legislative offices, an information workshop for marine Sea Grant colleagues, facilitated meetings between regulatory authorities and affected businesses, partnerships with regulatory agencies and fish health experts to develop a national outreach plan and applied research with prominent fish health experts.

    June 24 at 12 noon
    Matt Austin, NOS Office of Coast Survey Cartographic and Geospatial Technologies Program, will present "Development of the Fishing Ecosystem Analysis Tool (FEAT)."

    Powerpoint slides (pdf format)

    Abstract: The Fishing Ecosystem Analysis Tool (FEAT) is a system for analyzing and spatially displaying commercial and recreational catch data in combination with the place-based approach to defining and measuring fishing communities envisioned by National Standard 8 of the Magnuson-Stevens Act. Fishing communities in Hawaii are currently defined at the island level, which is overly broad for conducting social impact analysis. A suitable scale for many analyses is Zip Code Tabulation Area, which the U.S. Bureau of the Census developed by aggregating census blocks. We refer to these areas as Socioeconomic Zones because they can be characterized using Census socioeconomic variables such household income, poverty level, education, ethnicity and many others. Socioeconomic zones can be linked to commercial marine license catch data and recreational catch data using anglers' zip codes. This allows for spatial analysis and reporting of catch variables such as species, pounds landed, port of landing, gear used, and fishing area location. We can then associate any of these variables with socioeconomic zones and characteristics. Data from 10 years of commercial marine license catch reports and 7 years of recreational catch data currently are entered into the database. We will provide a number of examples of possible analyses that can be conducted with FEAT, which has the capability to tie in with other Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) data systems and to be used for many purposes other than analysis of human dimensions data.

    June 30 at 12 noon
    John Lupton, PhD, NOAA's Pacific Marine Environmental Lab, will present "Venting of liquid carbon dioxide on a Mariana Arc submarine volcano: A natural laboratory for studying effects of ocean acidification."

    Powerpoint presentation (Lupton_063009.ZIP, 100 MB including ppt and video clips)

    Powerpoint only (ppt)

    Abstract: The NOAA Vents Program has recently been studying activity on submarine volcanoes along volcanic arcs. These studies have revealed that several of these submarine arc volcanoes are venting fluids highly concentrated in carbon dioxide. One in particular, NW Eifuku volcano in the northern Mariana Arc, is releasing droplets of pure liquid CO2 into the ocean at about 1600 m depth, about one mile under the ocean surface. The high CO2 concentrations at this vent site, which is appropriately named Champagne, locally produce acidic or low pH conditions that affect the mussels and other organisms that inhabit the volcano. Five other volcanoes on the Mariana and Tonga-Kermadec Arcs have also been found to be venting CO2 as a pure gas phase. These sites represent valuable natural laboratories for studying the effects of acidic CO2-rich environments on marine ecosytems.

    July 1 at 12 noon
    Anna Fiolek, NOAA Central Library, will present "Polar Resources in the NOAA Central Library Network." This seminar is part of the NODC International Polar Year (IPY) Seminar Series (http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/General/NODC-About/Outreach/NODC-seminars09.html#IPYSeminars).
    Abstract: Located in Silver Spring, Maryland, the NOAA Central Library (NCL) networks over thirty NOAA libraries nationwide. NCL is considered the most comprehensive multidisciplinary and historically richest scientific collection in hydrographic surveying, oceanography, ocean engineering, atmospheric sciences (climatology and meteorology), meteorological satellite applications, living marine resources, geophysics, cartography, and mathematics in the United States. It incorporates holdings of NOAA’s predecessor agencies, including the Coast and Geodetic Survey, National Weather Service, and the Bureau of Fisheries. The collections reflect the history of these organizations, their scientific research, observations and data from 1820 to the present. The NOAA Library Network collections are unique; over 40% of the items in NOAALINC (the online catalog) and their manual catalogs are not found anywhere else. Unique polar research includes historic and current reports from the various polar expeditions, and research and observations from both the Arctic and Antarctic regions. The presence of these unique and historical resources in NOAA impelled the Library to participate in the 4th International Polar Year (IPY) 2007-2008 activities. Many unique and historically valuable NOAA polar research documents and scientific data, in the forms of digital videos, still images, and datasets, have been entered into the NOAALINC, the National Oceanographic Data Center Ocean Archive System (OAC), and other oceanographic information catalogs and databases. This was possible thanks to the Library’s collaboration with several NOAA projects and programs, including the Video Data Management System (VDMS), Climate Data Modernization Program (CDMP), and NODC Cruise Report Program. Over two hundred thirty of these unique and historically valuable documents were selected, cataloged, imaged and entered into NOAALINC to assure online, open access to their full-text files. A comprehensive bibliography has been prepared to provide an additional access point to the polar related resources via the Library’s home page. This online bibliography also serves as an Internet locator for printed and remote resources in polar research. It is located at: http://docs.lib.noaa.gov/rescue/Bibliographies/IPY2007.pdf. During the 4th IPY, the NOAA Library Network collections serve as an important resource for polar data and research. The Library’s IPY home page and the Polar Poster developed in NCL serve as an additional access point to the library’s polar resources. The library's IPY home page and Polar Poster are located at: http://www.lib.noaa.gov/collections/ipy.html ; http://docs.lib.noaa.gov/rescue/Bibliographies/IPY2007_poster.pdf.

    TO BE RESCHEDULED
    Ed Kruse, International Affairs Specialist, NOS International Program Office, and Doctoral candidate, University of Maryland, Marine Estuarine and Environmental Science program, will present "Reducing Threats of Land-based Sources of Pollution to Human and Ecosystem Health: A case study for the Island of Dominica."

    Abstract: Dominica is the northern most windward island in the Caribbean Sea. It’s economy is mainly supported by agriculture however the importance of tourism and specifically eco-tourism is a growing economic sector. A preliminary assessment of the vulnerability of the Springfield catchment area to impacts from anthropogenic pollutants was conducted to identify potential threats to the watershed and the drinking water supply. The Springfield catchment area serves as the drinking water source for the City of Roseau and the surrounding environs. Data were collected on water flow, land use, and basic physical/chemical parameters (DO, pH, nitrogen, dissolved solids) to establish an initial baseline. A preliminary inventory of point and nonpoint sources of pollution was obtained and the data were geocoded for analysis by the geographic information system. Data on landuse, soils, vegetation and topography were also collected and brought into ArcGis. Analysis of the data collected revealed several potential anthropogenic sources of contamination which could pose detrimental impacts to the catchments water quality. Important threats identified by this study included: (1) heavy erosion and sedimentation during high rainfall periods, (2) migration of pesticide and fertilizer residues into raw drinking water; (3) unregulated trash disposal within the catchment area, (4) potential high levels of disinfection by products (trihalomethanes and haloaetic acid) from chlorination of the drinking water., and runoff from road surfaces (oil,grease). Anthropogenic effects observed in the field or documented in the data review ranged from pesticide and fertilizer residues from farming practices, sedimentation, disinfection by products resulting from chlorination of organic rich water, and poorly planned human development development in the headwaters of the catchment area. The catchment is traversed by a major road connecting Roseau with the primary airport at Melville Hall. All drainage form the road drains directly into the catchment basin through a series of culverts and through direct runoff from the road surface. It is recommended that a source water protection plan be developed and implemented in combination with additional monitoring of water quality for disinfection byproducts, herbicides/pesticides, and microbiological contaminants particularily parasites that are resistant to disinfection by chlorinati.

    July 16 at 12 noon
    John C. Bortniak (Commander NOAA Corps (Retired), will present "Recollections on Wintering Over at The South Pole 1979 on The 30 Year Anniversary.
    Powerpoint presentation (pdf format)

    Thursday, July 16 from 2:00 - 3:00 EST
    YOUR ONLINE NOAA LIBRARY: Three webinars featuring customized training for NOAA staff on effective use of library electronic resources.

    Session #1, Thursday, July 16, 2-3pm EST: An Overview of CSA Illumina Databases:

    • Aquatic Sciences and Fisheries Abstracts (ASFA)
    • BioOne Abstracts and Indexes
    • Conference Papers Index
    • Meteorological and Geoastrophysical Abstracts (MGA)
    • Oceanic Abstracts
    • Water Resources Abstracts
    • TOXLINE
    Search across thousands of journals on topics such as wave and current energy, climate change, marine spatial planning, habitat restoration, ecosystem management, and more.

    These databases are available to all NOAA staff nationwide via the NOAA Central Library's databases page. (Note MGA is available only to NOAA staff in Silver Spring, Camp Springs, Miami, Boulder, and Seattle.) Featured will be an introduction to CSA Illustrata, a database employing "deep indexing" to categorize and enable searching of tables, figures, graphs, charts and other illustrations from the scholarly research and technical literature. The webinar will be presented by a Customer Training Specialist from CSA.
    Please register by sending email to Library.Reference@noaa.gov. You will be sent a confirmation email with link to join the Webinar. NOAA staff and contractors nationwide are welcome to register.

    Thursday, August 6
    Marine Spatial Planning and Ecosystem Based Management --The Rhode Island Example, presented by
    Grover Fugate, Executive Director, Coastal Resources Management Council, Oliver Stedman Government Center, Wakefield, Rhode Island.
    Powerpoint slides (ppt format)

    Abstract: The Rhode Island Ocean SAMP, or Ocean Special Area Management Plan, will define use zones for Rhode Island's offshore waters through a research and planning process that integrates the best available science with open public input and involvement. From 2008 to 2010, through a public policy process that includes scientific research and stakeholder involvement, the Ocean SAMP will make Rhode Island the first state in the nation to zone its offshore waters for diverse activities including renewable energy development. This process will also protect current uses and habitats through zones for commercial fishing; critical habitats for fish, marine animals, and birds; marine transport; and more.

    Leading this project is the R.I. Coastal Resources Management Council (CRMC), the state's coastal management agency. Among other responsibilities, CRMC is charged with managing the state's submerged lands. CRMC has already zoned Rhode Island's near-shore waters for a variety of uses, from industrial ports to conservation areas. CRMC is leading the SAMP effort with the support of the University of Rhode Island (URI). Federal agencies such as the Minerals Management Service and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, which have authority in federal waters, will participate, as will state agencies including the R.I. Department of Environmental Management. Research projects undertaken by URI scientists will provide the essential scientific basis for Ocean SAMP policy development. These projects assess wind speeds, appropriate technologies, marine life, geology, meteorology, and more. Information about each project is available on the Ocean SAMP web site.

    Tuesday, August 11 at 10:30 am EST
    "Massachusetts Ocean Management Planning" presented by
    Bruce Carlisle, Deputy Director, Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management
    Powerpoint slides

    Abstract: On May 28, 2008 Governor Deval Patrick signed the Oceans Act of 2008. The Oceans Act requires the Secretary of Energy and Environmental Affairs to develop a comprehensive ocean management plan, following a scientific and stakeholder process that leads to a draft plan by summer of 2009, and the final promulgation of the plan by December 31, 2009. The plan will use comprehensive science-based planning to assure long-term protection and sustainable use of ocean resources and to accommodate the siting of appropriate scale offshore renewable energy facilities. The draft plan was released for public comment on June 30, 2009. Mr. Carlisle will talk about the process for developing the plan and the information it contains. More information on the Ocean Management Plan can be found on the Massachusetts CZM Program web site: http://www.mass.gov/czm/czm.htm. Sponsored by the NOAA NOS Office of Coastal and Resource Management, Atlantic Coastal Management Programs and Planning/Budgeting.

    Bio: Bruce Carlisle is the Assistant Director of the Massachusetts Coastal Zone Management Program in the Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs. Mr. Carlisle has been with CZM since 1993, serving in several positions, including coordinator of the Coastal Nonpoint Pollution Control Program and manager of the Wetlands Restoration Program, before being promoted to Assistant Director in 2005. Mr. Carlisle has a masters in Environmental Policy from Tufts University.

    Wednesday, August 12 at 12 noon
    "Investigation of the Hurricane Katrina Case in New Orleans: National Weather Service Environmental Risk Communications Across Cultures" presented by Curtis D. Cary, director of Communications and Executive Affairs for NOAA's NWS, and Vankita Brown, doctoral student in Mass Communications and Media Studies at Howard University in Washington, DC. Vankita was awarded a NOAA Graduate Scientist Fellowship in 2007 and is assigned to the National Weather Service.

    Abstract: Today, the National Weather Service has some of the most thorough products and precise lead times for predicting weather events; yet, with all its definitive data some people, because of adverse risk behavior, still succumb unnecessarily to weather incidents. This paradox has caused NWS to consider employing methods, thought to be unconventional in an empirical scientific environment that will examine this challenge. NOAA and the National Weather Service representatives recognize the importance of social science research and integrate disciplines such as, anthropology, psychology, sociology, economics, and communications to meet their goals and mission. This interdisciplinary approach will provide an opportunity to enhance and improve the ability of the NWS to protect life and property. As a part of this initiative, NWS has undertaken the task of investigating the impacts of culture on weather related risk communication on diverse and vulnerable populations. NWS Communications Director, Curtis Carey, Ph.D. and NOAA Graduate Scientist, Vankita Brown, are working together to discover ways in which culture influences risk perception and behavior during times of severe weather events and natural disasters. In June, Brown traveled to New Orleans for two weeks to talk with emergency management personnel, academic professionals, and residents for phase one of her ongoing research project on communicating risk across cultures. She will present her initial findings in this brown bag luncheon. Her study will serve as a framework or model to assist forecasters in developing more effective protocols and mechanisms for communicating risks to diverse and vulnerable publics.

    Bios: Curtis D. Carey, Ph.D., has a unique combination of international and domestic communications experience, serving in a variety of commercial broadcasting, government, military, and academic positions. He is currently the director of Communications and Executive Affairs for National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Weather Service. He has served as a national press officer for NOAA and the Department of The Interior, managing media relations on issues ranging from domestic energy policy to environmental sciences Dr. Carey has a B.A. (cum laude) in Asian Studies with a minor in Communication from the University of the State of New York; a Graduate Certificate in Integrated Marketing Communication from the University of Denver; a M.A. in Communication from the University of Oklahoma; and a Ph.D. in Communication and Culture from Howard University in Washington, D.C.

    Vankita Brown is a doctoral student in Mass Communications and Media Studies at Howard University in Washington, DC. She was granted the prestigious NOAA Graduate Scientist Fellowship in 2007 and is assigned to the National Weather Service. Her current research involves understanding how culture affects decision making and behavior in the threat of natural disasters.Prior to pursuing her Ph.D., Brown worked for various non-profit agencies in public relations. She is a member of Community Service Public Relations Council and CORO Women in Leadership. Brown is a recent recipient of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication's Inez Kaiser Graduate Student of Color Award. She has a M.A. in Media Communications Management from Webster University in St. Louis, Missouri and a B.A. in Mass Communications from Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville.

    Friday, August 21, at 12 noon
    Title: Chart the Future: NOAA's Next Generation Strategic Plan
    Speaker: Paul Doremus, Deputy Assistant Administrator & Director of Strategic Planning, NOAA Program, Planning and Integration
    Speaker Bio: http://www.ppi.noaa.gov/PPI_Organization/paul_doremus.html
    Remote access via webinar will be available.

    Abstract: It’s time to "Chart the Future" to better prepare for the external developments and challenges we face while continuing to serve as the nation’s most trusted source on environmental leadership. Join us in our commitment to reassess and renew the mission, vision, and goals of NOAA as part of the Next Generation Strategic Plan. The objective of the Next Generation Strategic Plan is to inform and respond to the priorities of the new administration; to engage and respond to stakeholders; to respond to the long-term external challenges facing the agency; and to meet the GPRA and related requirements. This initiative aims to support our role in helping understand and predict changes in Earth's environment and conserve and manage coastal and marine resources to meet our Nation's economic, social, and environmental needs.
    Powerpoint Slides (ppt format)

    Thursday, September 10 at 12 noon
    Title: The 7th Framework Program for Research of the European Commission - Transatlantic opportunites for research cooperation.
    Speaker: Astrid Koch, European Commission Science and Technology Counselor

    Powerpoint slides (pdf, 1,380 KB)


    Abstract: With this brown bag seminar the European Commission would like to increase the knowledge within NOAA about our 7th Framework Programme and lay the foundation for developing ways to collaborate on research and policy topics (Examples, but not limited to: space weather, earth observation, data management, modelling, ocean management, climate change impacts). The European Commission launched new calls for research proposals in a variety of areas -- all open to partnerships with countries from outside the European Research Area, including the United States. U.S. research institutions, universities and industry are invited to join research proposals under the Cooperation, Capacities and People Programme of the Seventh Framework Programme for Research and Development (FP7). Sponsored by NOAA Research, International Activities Office.

    Tuesday, September 15 at 12 noon
    DC EnvironMentors will present a review of the benefits to NOAA employees in serving as a mentor to area Senior High School Students in developing a science project, as well as many other volunteer opportunities to help high school students consider careers in the environmental sciences. It is a great opportunity for NOAA employees to share their expertise.
    Speakers: Jacklyn Shafir, DC EnvironMentors Program Manager; Ed Gorecki, former Mentor.
    Powerpoint slides (pdf>

    Wednesday, September 16 at 12 noon
    Title: Communicating NOAA's Science and Data Through Social Media Tools
    Speakers: Bradley Akamine, NOAA Director of Online Communications, Ron Jones, NWS Internet Projects Specialist and Chair, DoC Social Media Working Group, Pat Erdenberger, NOAA Records Officer, Kate Naughten, NOAA Fisheries, and Emily Crum, NOAA National Ocean Service.
    Powerpoint slides (pdf; 1014 KB)

    Abstract: Panel Discussion on best practices, policies, and innovative use of social media tools within NOAA and Department of Commerce. Has your program considered using YouTube, Twitter, Facebook, Addthis.com, Flickr, or other Web 2.0 tools? Lively discussion promised on using these new technology and communications tools to make NOAA data and science more useful, more efficient and more transparent to the public.

    Thursday, September 17 at 12 noon
    Title: "Building Partnerships to Improve Climate and Drought Monitoring on the Southern Colorado Plateau" presented by the Climate Assessment for the Southwest (CLIMAS) RISA team. Sponsored by Climate Program Office.
    Speakers: Daniel Ferguson, Program Manager, CLIMAS, University of Arizona, Powerpoint slides (pdf; 1228KB)
    Mike Crimmins, Climate Science Extension Specialist, University of Arizona, Powerpoint slides (pdf; 2313KB)
    Arnold Taylor, Hopi Department of Natural Resources, Powerpoint slides (pdf; 798KB)

    Abstract: Over the last several years, the Climate Assessment for the Southwest (CLIMAS) program, based at the University of Arizona, has worked with a wide variety of stakeholders in the Southwest to increase their capacity to cope with ongoing drought conditions. In recent years, stakeholders have become increasingly concerned with understanding and planning for anticipated climate changes, including the possibility of prolonged drought conditions throughout the region. The warmer and drier conditions already experienced in the Southwest are resulting in significant cultural and socioeconomic impacts that are expected to worsen with increased warming. In Arizona and New Mexico, American Indian Nations are managing large areas of land and water resources, yet they often lack robust climate data and information to inform their decisions. This presentation will focus on emerging CLIMAS efforts to partner with the Hopi Nation and Navajo Nation to: 1) help develop a network of natural resource managers that ensures better access to drought and climate information and 2) improve climate and drought monitoring on the southern Colorado Plateau. This emergent work with Native Nations is part of ongoing CLIMAS efforts to build the long-term partnerships necessary to foster climate adaptation capacity throughout the Southwest.

    September 22 at 12:00 noon
    "A Program Evaluation Network for NOAA" presented by Cassandra Barnes, Policy, Planning, and Evaluation, OAR
    Powerpoint slides (pdf; 1,316 KB)

    Abstract: Program Evaluation is a tool used to describe why your program is seeing the results it is. Join me as I describe the tools and pointers I learned from a detail assignment at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Evaluation Support Division. The presentation will provide some ideals that NOAA can adapt to build capacity to conduct program evaluation. What other organizations in NOAA are interested in Program Evaluation? Please, sign-up for the new Program Evaluation Network during the presentation.

    September 24 at 12:00 noon
    "Web Training Through the Federal Acquisition Institute," presented by Department of Defense, Federal Acquisition Institute. Hosted by NOAA Fisheries EEO/Diversity Committee.
    Powerpoint slides (pdf)

    Tuesday, September 29 at 12:00 PM
    Title: "Oceans for Life: Enhancing Cultural Understanding through Ocean Science" will be presented by the Office of National Marine Sanctuaries (ONMS) and the National Marine Sanctuary Foundation (NMSF).
    Speakers: Jonathan Shannon, Oceans For Life 2009 program director, ONMS Education Liaison, Michiko Martin, ONMS Communications and Outreach Division head, Letise LaFeir, NMSF Director of Education and Government Relations

    Powerpoint slides (pdf)

    Abstract: All life in the ocean is connected and in the same way our human cultures are all connected. Diversity is a strength in the ocean world. So too in ours. The goal of the Ocean for Life program is to bring better understanding of the diverse marine world and of the diverse peoples of the world. Our lives depend on close connections to the ocean -- and on the close connections that link us all. During two field studies, one to the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary (July 15-30) and the other to the Cordell Bank, Gulf of the Farallones, and Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuaries (July 29-Aug 9), high school students from Western and Middle Eastern countries worked together to learn more about marine science and each other's cultures. The students captured their experience by creating youth media projects based upon the three themes of Ocean for Life: a sense of place, interconnectedness, and ocean conservation and stewardship. These projects will be shared along with highlights from the two field studies. Upon returning to their home communities, the participants are encouraged to use their experience to become better stewards of their local environment, promote its connection to the ocean, and strengthen the links they have built to the communities and cultures of their fellow participants. We will also discuss how you can help this effort, through serving as a mentor and/or forum moderator on www.oceanforlife.org.

    Tuesday, October 6 at 12 noon
    Title: "How Charts Have Played a Role in American History"
    Speakers: Captains Steven Barnum and John Lowell, Office of Coast Survey; Albert Theberge, NOAA Central Library
    Captain Barnum slides - NOAA Charts Make History
    Skip Theberge slides - A Look Back: NOAA Charts in History
    Captain Lowell slides - Past and Future of NOAA's Nautical Chart System
    Abstract: NOAA is the nation's chartmaker. Since the early 1800s, cartographers developing nautical charts for NOAA predecessor organizations have played a vital -- but usually unrecognized -- role in major historical events. This presentation will provide a fascinating look at how charts and other Coast Survey graphical products were involved in American history, from 1807 to 1945, with highlights from the Civil War, the two World Wars, and an analysis of the 1927 Mississippi River flood. Coast Survey will briefly describe the "chart of the future." Note: Following the seminar, there will be a special presentation to show appreciation for the assistance provided by NOAA Library to Office of Coast Survey.

    Wednesday, October 14 at 12 noon
    Title: The Australian Rip Current Problem: Research, outreach and politics
    Speaker: Dr Rob Brander, School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia
    Abstract: It is estimated that at any given time, approximately 18,000 rip currents operate on Australia's 11,000 beaches. It is therefore not surprising that the vast majority of the 90 coastal drownings and 90% of the more than 15,000 rescues each year are related to rip currents. Unfortunately, the incidence of rip related drownings has not changed in the last decade suggesting that whatever rip education is in place is not working. For example, results from ongoing research has shown that 60% of Australian beachgoers cannot recognize a rip current. One of the fundamental limitations is that findings from scientific rip research have not translated successfully into beach safety programs and interventions. Furthermore, existing rip education in Australia is largely ad hoc, inconsistent and hindered by politics. This seminar describes Australian rip current systems and the challenges and limitations facing the improvement of rip current research, education and awareness.
    View the YouTube video Don't get sucked in by the rip..

    Thursday, October 15 at 12 noon
    Title: Program Evaluators' Network: The PEN is a voluntary, informal network that meets monthly to 1) share best practices and lessons learned in evaluation and 2) explores the theory, practice, and policy of evaluation.
    Contact: Cassandra.Barnes@noaa.gov, 301-734-1190, Policy, Planning, and Evaluation, OAR
    Abstract:
    Introduction (Ice Breaker)
    What is Program Evaluation?
    Where is Program Evaluation in NOAA?
    Discuss Future Monthly Meetings: topics of interest
    Possible examples:
    * peer review article discussion
    * logic models
    * program evaluation methodology
    * outcome vs. output
    * overcoming evaluation resistance
    More information: Cassandra's Library Presentation on 9/22/09 (pdf format)

    Tuesday, October 20 at 12 noon
    Title: The Structure and Progress of the Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS)
    Speakers: Jennie Lyons (IOOS Communications) and April Black (IOOS Legislative Affairs)
    Powerpoint slides (pdf format)
    Abstract: As "our eyes on the oceans, coasts, and Great Lakes", the Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) is a tool for tracking, predicting, managing, and adapting to changes in our marine environment. IOOS delivers the data and information needed to increase our understanding of our waters, so decision makers can take action to improve safety, enhance the economy, and protect the environment. NOAA is proud to lead a national partnership of 17 federal agencies and 11 regions working together to link marine data in an easy-to-use standard format that will provide users with a composite picture of our nation's waters in an accurate and timely manner. This seminar will discuss some of the complexities of the national IOOS efforts, what NOAA and its partners are doing to integrate our ocean and coastal data, and IOOS benefits to data users, the general public, and the nation.

    Thursday, October 22 at 12 noon
    Title: "Methods and measurements of relative sea level and monitoring its long-term trends and anomalies, with emphasis on the June-July 2009 East Coast event"
    Speaker: William Sweet, Ph.D., NOAA NOS/CO-OPS Oceanographer
    Powerpoint slides (pdf format)
    Abstract: NOAA's Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services (CO-OPS) has been measuring sea level (SL) for over 150 years. Historically tasked with providing a reference for charting and marine boundaries, the national network tracks relative regional SL trends that are location-specific and vary by +/-1 cm/yr nationwide. The network also detects variability about the mean seasonal SL cycle that CO-OPS derives and incorporates into its tidal predictions. An extreme in this variability occurred during June and July 2009 when SL was ~0.3 m higher than predicted along most of the U.S. East Coast. Near-peak levels in the latter half of June coincided with a perigean-spring tide that added to the observed SL anomaly and flooded many coastal areas in the absence of coastal storms normally causing these conditions. The June - July 2009 SL anomaly was the most extreme event to occur simultaneously over the entire East Coast during a summer period as far back as 1980.

    Friday, October 23 at 12 noon
    Title: Marine Biodiversity Research in Canada: the Canadian Healthy Ocean Network (CHONe; www.chone.ca)
    Speaker: Dr. Paul Snelgrove, Memorial University in Canada, and Program Director for the Canadian Healthy Ocean Network (CHONe; www.chone.ca).
    Abstract: With about 15 academic institutions and over 100 PIs, CHONe is the largest Canadian research program focusing on marine biodiversity. The Network focuses particularly on geographical patterns in biodiversity, population connectivity and ecosystem functionality, and management support is an important element in the CHONe approach. Discussion on considering how activities within NOAA might be coordinated with those of CHONe.

    Wednesday, November 4 from 10-3
    Library Book Fair - The NOAA Central Library will host its 16th Annual Book Fair and Flea Market on Wednesday, November 4, 2009, from 10:00 A.M. to 3:00 P.M. at the NOAA Central Library. The Library is located on the 2nd Floor of SSMC #3 in Silver Spring.
    Four separate events are scheduled at the Library on November 4th:
    1) Association Book Exhibit will display new publications in all fields of interest to NOAA. Please offer your suggestions regarding books to be displayed to Steve.Quillen@noaa.gov. The exhibit will give us an opportunity to evaluate the books before purchasing.
    2) Duplicate copies of Library material will be on display and available for the taking.
    3) A Flea Market is being sponsored by the Friends of the NOAA Library. Donations are still being accepted for the Flea Market. Proceeds will be used to benefit the Friends of the NOAA Library which is a tax-exempt charitable organization dedicated to support the library through acquisitions, preservation and information dissemination. Drop off your donations with Steve Quillen at the NOAA Central Library (301-713-2600 x122) or Doria Grimes, a Friends member, at Room 6214 SSMC 1 (301-713-1055 x157)
    4) Brown Bag Seminar - rescheduled for Nov. 5

    Thursday, November 5 (rescheduled from Nov 4) at 12 noon
    Title: NOAA's Gulf of Mexico Marine Debris Project: Accomplishments and Lessons Learned
    Speaker: Nir Barnea, NOAA Office of Response and Restoration, Seattle
    Abstract: During the 2005 hurricane season, Hurricanes Katrina and Rita inflicted severe damage on the Gulf of Mexico coastal region and deposited huge amounts of debris over large areas of the Gulf coastal waters. This submerged debris posed a persistent hazard to commercial navigation, fishing activities, recreational boating, and living marine resources. With Congressional funding, NOAA's Office of Coast Survey (OCS) and Office of Response and Restoration (OR&R) launched a joint project to address marine debris impacts on the Gulf Coast. Collaborating with Federal, State, and local agencies, the project conducted side scan sonar surveys and mapping of nearshore waters, coordinated multi-agency review of marine debris to facilitate removal, and posted survey results and other information on the project website at http://gulfofmexico.marinedebris.noaa.gov/. Partnering with Sea Grant, the project conducted an extensive public outreach campaign to fishing communities and the general public. Since August, 2006, the project has surveyed 1580 square nautical mile, mapped 7,000 submerged items, developed a model to predict marine debris dispersion, and collaborated with its regional partners to generate a document containing lessons learned from the response to this large-scale marine debris dispersion, as well as recommendations and best practices to address future such event. Sponsored by NOAA Marine Debris program.

    Tuesday, November 17 at 12 noon
    Title: Marine Protected Areas (MPA) Center Databases - Applications and Uses
    Speakers: Jordan Gass and Mimi D'Iorio, NOAA National Marine Protected Areas Center, Monterey, California
    Powerpoint slides (pdf format)
    Abstract: The MPA Center maintains various databases on state, federal, territorial and tribal marine protected areas throughout the US. The MPAs are classified based on the types of protection, and coupled with the geospatial boundary data, these data can be used to support a number of NOAA programs and partners. This talk will describe the MPA Center databases including the types of data, and examples of applications and uses for the coastal, marine and Great Lakes environments of the US.

    Wednesday, November 18 at 12 noon
    The NOAA NMFS Office of Habitat Conservation will present the 2009 Dr. Nancy Foster Habitat Conservation Award and seminar. The annual award, which honors a commitment of excellence in service to habitat conservation, will be presented to Charles ("Si") Simenstad, Research Professor and Coordinator, Wetland Ecosystem Team, School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, University of Washington. Mr. Simenstad will then present a library brown bag seminar:
    Title: The Need for More Strategic Estuarine/Marine Restoration and Conservation: The Puget Sound Nearshore Ecosystem Restoration Project (PSNERP) Approach
    Abstract: Most opportunistic restoration and conservation of estuarine/marine ecosystems are presumed to be universally beneficial to ecosystem functions, goods and services. However, limited resources and focused objectives (e.g., essential fish habitat) would dictate that we need to be more strategic in selecting what restoration/conservation actions and where and how we deploy them in the coastal landscapes. Lessons learned from many of the larger ecosystem restoration projects suggest that it is challenging to plan and implement a comprehensive ecosystem approach. The Puget Sound Nearshore Ecosystem Restoration Project (PSNERP) is designing restoration and conservation of nearshore beaches, estuaries and deltas around the entire ~4000 km of the Sound's shoreline. Our approach is based on: (1) documenting historic changes of geomorphic and ecological structure in shoreline landforms; (2) assessing to what extent these changes have resulted in the impairment of nearshore ecosystem processes and the implications of degraded ecosystem functions, goods and services; (3) developing spatially-explicit inventory of restoration/conservation needs; (4) designing strategies for optimal recovery and conservation of nearshore processes in specific nearshore "process units"; (5) evaluating the risk to these strategies of future population growth and development, and climate change, anticipated for the Puget Sound region; and, (6) assembling portfolios of restoration/conservation actions that would provide optimal ecosystem benefit, persistence and resilience. If and when implemented, rigorous monitoring and scientific assessment will be nested in an adaptive management framework that will allow us to test and refine the outcomes of such a strategic approach.

    Tuesday, December 1 at 12 noon
    Title: Program Evaluators' Network: The PEN is a voluntary, informal network that meets monthly to 1) share best practices and lessons learned in evaluation and 2) explores the theory, practice, and policy of evaluation.
    Contact: Cassandra.Barnes@noaa.gov, 301-734-1190, Policy, Planning, and Evaluation, OAR.
    Remote access available. See above.

    Thursday, December 10 at 11:30
    Holiday Party and Seminar for all NOAA staff and contractors!
    NOAA Holiday Band from 11:30 - 12 noon along with refreshments and mixing and mingling!
    Speaker at 12 noon: Mike Ford, Oceanographer, Office of the Assistant Administrator for Fisheries, National Marine Fisheries Service
    Title: Jellyfish: Swimming, Eating, and Getting Eaten
    Powerpoint slides

    Abstract: This seminar will look at two research areas: i.) the functional morphology of gelatinous zooplankton and its relationship to swimming, feeding, and ecology, and ii.) trends in gelatinous zooplankton over the entire Northeast Shelf of the US. These two lines of research would ultimately intersect to better understand the size and type of impact gelatinous zooplankton has on this system.

    Morphology and kinematics of scyphomedusae and hydromedusae generate flow fields that entrain prey. Swimming resulted in a pulsed series of toroids which travel along the medusan oral arms and tentacles. Prey was entrained in this flow and the location of encounter was influenced by the phase of the pulsation cycle during which entrainment occurred. Flow-field velocities, measured by tracking particles adjacent to the bell margin during contraction, increased with bell diameter. Differences in body design produce differing flow patterns and capture strategies. These relationships can provide insight into prey selection.

    The number of ctenophores found in approximately 60,000 stomachs of the spiny dogfish (Squalus acanthias) over the last 30 years provided an estimate of the abundance of ctenophores across the Northeast Continental Shelf of the US. There have been a few such major increases in ctenophores in enclosed (e.g. Caspian Sea) and semi enclosed (e.g. Mediterranean Sea) ecosystems, with concomitant significant effects on those ecosystems and the productivity of their fishery resources.

    2010 Brown Bags

    Wednesday, January 20 at 12 noon
    Speakers: Paul Boyle, Senior Vice President for Conservation at Association of Zoos and Aquariums, Bill Mott, Director of The Ocean Project, and Douglas Meyer, consultant with Bernuth and Williamson
    Title: America, the Ocean, and Climate Change: New Insights for Conservation, Awareness, and Action.
    Powerpoint slides (pdf format)
    Abstract: The Ocean Project advances ocean conservation in partnership with zoos, aquariums, and museums. Part of its work is to conduct market research and strategic communications tools for its Partner network of 1,000 institutions and organizations. This presentation will focus on the market research that The Ocean Project completed this past year. It's the single largest, most comprehensive public opinion research project ever undertaken on behalf of any environmental concern, with findings that are helping those in the ocean conservation community connect more strategically with the public for positive change. With support from NOAA through an Environmental Literacy Grant, the national study was conducted for The Ocean Project by IMPACTS in collaboration with the Monterey Bay Aquarium and the National Aquarium in Baltimore. This study was completed in November 2008 with responses by 22,000 American adults. Additionally, The Ocean Project completed the first of four semi-annual tracking surveys in September 2009. The tracking surveys are helping measure changes in opinions and test messages to the public. This presentation will provide an overview of the research findings, implications, and how The Ocean Project Partners and others are using the findings to improve ocean literacy.

    Thursday, January 28 at 12 noon
    Title: 5 Years After the Indian Ocean Tsunami: Where Are We now?"
    Powerpoint slides (pdf format)
    Speaker: Dr. Dwayne Meadows of the NMFS Office of Protected Resources
    Abstract: Dr. Meadows, A NOAA Fisheries biologist, survived the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami in Khao Lak, Thailand; the worst hit part of Thailand where 80% of the 10,000 deaths occurred. He used his NOAA advanced first-aid training to lead response efforts for group of 1000 survivors who were cut off from assistance. He later used his expertise in marine debris removal and coral restoration to help in the recovery efforts and became an advisor to the Hawaii Civil Defense Office and NOAAs National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program on preparedness and mitigation issues. Dr. Meadows will update the status of the recovery of human and ecological communities in the area. He will also provide a summary of international, national, and NOAA accomplishments and outstanding needs to develop improved tsunami preparedness programs. Preliminary lessons from the Samoan Tsunami of 2009 will be highlighted.
    Remote access will be available.

    Wednesday, February 3 at 11:00 AM
    Title: Leadership Attitudes and Public Attitudes on Climate Change
    Powerpoint slides (pdf format)
    Speaker: Jon D. Miller, John Hannah Professor of Integrative Studies at Michigan State University
    Abstract: Professor Jon D. Miller, of Michigan State University, will discuss his analyses of leadership attitudes and public attitudes toward climate change and the challenges of effectively communicating scientific concepts and data to these audiences. For more than two decades, Professor Miller has conducted national surveys of science policy leaders and American adults on a wide array of scientific and technological subjects, and he has collected measures of both scientific literacy and substantive policy attitudes over this period. He continues to collect new information from both of these populations. In this presentation, Professor Miller will suggest that on issues that are scientific and technical in character, the process of policy formation involves a dynamic interaction between policy leaders and citizens who are attentive to the issues involved. It is important for policy and communications planners to understand the structure of the public policy process in regard to issues that are partially or substantially scientific, and he will outline a framework for thinking about this process. The presentation will involve a short PowerPoint presentation followed by a period for discussion and dialogue.
    Remote access will be available. See the General Information section above for details.

    Wednesday, February 3 at 12 noon
    Title: How U.S. Technology is Revolutionizing the Design of Recirculating Aquaculture Systems (RAS)
    Powerpoint slides (pdf format)
    Speaker: Dr. Ronald F. Malone, Distinguished Professor in Civil and Environmental Engineering at Louisiana State University
    Abstract: This seminar presentation will highlight technical advances that led to a new design for the Recirculating Aquaculture Systems (RAS) being used in commercial aquaculture facilities in the United States. In addition to efficient water treatment, this new technology supports critical design objectives for large-scale recirculating systems including low water loss, solid waste reduction or reuse, energy conservation, and long term economic sustainability. An ongoing research program, with funding from NOAA Sea Grant and the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, has demonstrated the application of this water-conserving RAS filtration approach in marine finfish applications. Development of high volume, modularized closed marine RAS fingerling production facilities are viewed as critical to the development of a commercially viable finfish grow out production industry based on netpens, ponds, or RAS technologies. This seminar is sponsored by the NOAA Aquaculture Program.
    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.

    Thursday, February 4 at 12 noon EST
    Title: Reducing the Threat of Ship Strikes to North Atlantic Right Whales
    Speakers: Shannon Bettridge and Greg Silber, NMFS/OPR/MMCD
    Abstract: Perhaps long underestimated as a factor in large whale recovery, collisions with large vessels are now regarded as a significant threat to several endangered large whale populations. Vessel collisions, or "ship strikes", is one of the main causes of death for the highly depleted the North Atlantic right whale. Their vulnerability to ship strikes is compounded by exposure to human activities near population centers in waters along the U.S. and Canadian east coasts, slow swimming speeds, and a natural positive buoyancy. In a population consisting of only 300-400 individuals, an average of about two right whales are struck and killed by vessels annually. Drs. Shannon Bettridge and Gregory Silber will discuss NOAA’s management actions and some research advances in the course of the last decade aimed at reducing the threat of ship strikes to right whales and other large whales. The talk will include two presentations made at a recent international conference.
    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.

    Tuesday, February 9 at 12 noon EST
    Title: "The critically endangered Hawaiian monk seal: a mysterious past and an uncertain future"
    Speaker: Jennifer Schultz, Department of Zoology, Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology, University of Hawaii
    Abstract: Genetic studies indicate that the Hawaiian monk seal diverged from its Mediterranean cousin 10-13 million years ago. At some point, it colonized the Hawaiian archipelago, but beyond that, very little is known about its early history or the first human-seal interactions. There is no mention of the species in the Kumulipo, the ancient Hawaiian chant of creation. The first description of the Seal was in 1807, when Lisianski explored the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. By the end of that century, the Hawaiian monk seal had been hunted to near extinction. The extremely low genetic diversity of the species offers some clues to its past and raises concern about its future. Dr. Jennifer Schultz will speak about previous research on the genetic diversity and stock structure of the Hawaiian monk seal and describe current efforts to understand the seal’s mating system, diet, and its susceptibility to infectious diseases.
    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.
    NOTE: Seminar cancelled due to severe snow.

    Wednesday, February 10 at 12 noon EST
    Title: "International...NOAA Style"
    Speaker: Dr. James Turner, Director of the Office of International Affairs and Senior Advisor to the NOAA Administrator
    Abstract: NOAA's Mission is driven by Science, Service, and Stewardship. Each of these drivers includes significant international aspects. We work collaboratively with other nations to make measurements and observations and share that data to develop, test, and evaluate our models. Our science and understanding are enriched through interactions with international peers. Besides providing information services to decision and policy makers domestically, NOAA also shares these services and others not only with our neighbors, but globally as well. Stewardship involves both conserving and preserving our domestic resources and protecting those resources from external threats. In the broader picture, stewardship extends to protecting resources in the world-wide ecosystem since national borders are not barriers to phenomena in the oceans and atmosphere. The relationship between the Office of International Affairs, the Line Offices, Goal Teams, and International Affairs Council will be described. What will be presented includes examples of international activities which significantly support NOAA's Mission and opportunities for enhancing international contributions.
    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.
    NOTE: Seminar cancelled due to severe snow.

    Thursday, February 11 at 12 noon EST
    Title: "Characterization of Water Reflectance Spectra Variability: Implications for Hyperspectral Remote Sensing in Estuary Waters"
    Speaker: Dr. Chunlei Fan, Morgan State University
    Abstract: A series of airborne hyperspectral remote sensing campaigns were conducted from 2002 to 2005 at five U.S. estuaries: Apalachicola Bay, FL; ACE basin, SC; Grand Bay, MS; Delaware Bay, DE; and Chesapeake Bay, MD. 151 field stations were occupied within the flight tracts where the following were obtained: (1) water reflectance R(λ) spectra were acquired by a pair of ocean optic 2000 spectroradiometers, simultaneously, the concentration of (2) chlorophyll a and (3) total suspended solid, and the (4) absorption of colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) were measured at these stations. A principal component analysis was conducted to characterize the general variability of these water reflectance R(λ) spectra, and explore the factors that drive the variability of water reflectance in optically complex coastal environments. The results suggested that water reflectance spectra in turbid estuarine waters are the results of complex interactions of phytoplankton pigments, total suspended solids, and CDOM. The first principal component, which represents 72% of total variance of R(λ), is strongly affected by scattering of total suspended solids and the absorption of CDOM at the green region of spectra; while the second principal component represents 20% of total variation of R(λ) spectra is mainly driven by phytoplankton biomass e.g. Chl a concentrations in red and near infrared spectral regions. Furthermore, the results of this study could provide a framework for using hyperspectral remote sensing as a cost effective method to characterize water quality in optically complex coastal waters.
    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.
    NOTE: Seminar cancelled due to severe snow.

    Wednesday, February 24 at 12 noon EST
    Topic: Introduction to Library E-Resources: Journals, Research Databases, E-Books, and more!
    Trainers: Mary Lou Cumberpatch, Outreach and Education Librarian, and Chris Belter, Customer Education and Marketing Graduate Student Assistant, NOAA Central Library
    Audience: NOAA staff and contractors serviced by the NOAA Central Library in Silver Spring, Md.
    Abstract: The NOAA Central Library offers a wide variety of electronic resources to NOAA staff. These resources include online access to the full text of peer-reviewed journals, online databases indexing millions of scholarly publications, digitized versions of materials from the library's historical collection, and more. This seminar will present an overview of what electronic resources are available to NOAA staff through the NOAA Central Library and will demonstrate how to access them from your NOAA computer.
    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.

    Thursday, February 25 at 12 noon EST
    Title: Global Fever, A Compelling, Hands-on Experience For K-9th Grade Classrooms
    Speaker: Daniel Shaw, President and CEO, High Touch High Tech, www.ScienceMadeFun.net
    Abstract: The Global Fever program profoundly and dramatically helps kids understand our climate change. Students will learn about Climatology, the Greenhouse Effect and the impact of their Carbon Footprint.

    Wednesday, March 10 at 12 noon EST
    Title: "International...NOAA Style"
    Speaker: Dr. James Turner, Director of the Office of International Affairs and Senior Advisor to the NOAA Administrator
    Abstract: NOAA's Mission is driven by Science, Service, and Stewardship. Each of these drivers includes significant international aspects. We work collaboratively with other nations to make measurements and observations and share that data to develop, test, and evaluate our models. Our science and understanding are enriched through interactions with international peers. Besides providing information services to decision and policy makers domestically, NOAA also shares these services and others not only with our neighbors, but globally as well. Stewardship involves both conserving and preserving our domestic resources and protecting those resources from external threats. In the broader picture, stewardship extends to protecting resources in the world-wide ecosystem since national borders are not barriers to phenomena in the oceans and atmosphere. The relationship between the Office of International Affairs, the Line Offices, Goal Teams, and International Affairs Council will be described. What will be presented includes examples of international activities which significantly support NOAA's Mission and opportunities for enhancing international contributions.
    Powerpoint slides (pdf format)
    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.

    Thursday, March 11 at 12 noon EST
    March Meeting of the NOAA Performance Evaluation Network (PEN). The PEN is a voluntary, informal network that meets monthly to 1) share best practices and lessons learned in evaluation and 2) explores the theory, practice, and policy of evaluation. Contact: Cassandra.Barnes@noaa.gov, 301-734-1190, Policy, Planning, and Evaluation, OAR.
    March Agenda:
    1) Performance Management in NOAA - open discussion
    2) An Introduction to Bibliometric Research - Chris Belter, Customer Education and Marketing Graduate Assistant, NOAA Central Library
    Abstract: Bibliometrics is the process of using citations to evaluate the contribution an article, author, or institution has made to the realm of scientific discussion. Because a citation usually indicates that the citing article relates to and expands upon the contributions of the cited article, analyzing the number of citations a particular work receives can yield a fairly accurate measure of the impact that article has had on its field of study. This presentation will provide an introduction to the methods and limitations of bibliometric research, discuss various techniques for conducting bibliometric research, and provide examples of how to use bibliometrics to evaluate the output of a particular author or institution.
    3) Document Sharing/PEN website – Sandra Giger, NOAA CIO office
    4) American Evaluation Association conference in November 2010 - discussion of ideas for a collaboration to submit a paper.
    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.

    Monday, March 15 at 12 noon ET
    Title: AAAS Science & Technology Policy Fellowship Program at NOAA - Information Session with Current AAAS Fellows and AAAS Program Staff
    Powerpoint slides
    Speakers: Gabrielle Dreyfus, Christine Jessup and Laura Petes (current AAAS &: T Policy Fellows); Kira Mock and Sage Russell (AAAS Fellowship Program Staff)
    Abstract: American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Science & Technology Policy Fellows are competitively selected scientists and engineers at the post-doctoral level from a broad range of disciplines. These Fellows are available for placement in federal agencies for a 1-2 year term (renewal year can include details outside of the DC area). The Program has been in existence since 1973 and has an outstanding reputation. Many former Fellows currently occupy some of the highest positions in science policy throughout the government. AAAS partners with nearly 15 federal agencies, many Congressional offices and committees, and nearly 30 professional scientific societies to operate the Science & Technology Policy Fellowships.
    NOAA has hosted five AAAS Fellows since it began participating in the Fellowship Program in 2007. The Fellows offer scientific and technical expertise as they assist with projects, program management, or policy analysis. Fellows start work after two weeks of intense training in science policy (including ethics, the legislative process, and the budget process) and are supported throughout their two years with professional development activities. AAAS Fellows also serve as a link to a network of science and science policy professionals across academia and the government, including the network of over 2,000 current and former Fellows.
    The recruitment process for 2010-2011 AAAS Fellows is already underway, and prospective host offices must act soon participate. At this Brown Bag information session, current AAAS Fellows and AAAS program will share details about the program, insights about their experiences, upcoming deadlines in the recruitment process, and answer your questions. Because the renewal year of the Fellowship can include details outside of the DC area, regional offices and labs are encouraged to participate via webinar.
    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.

    Tuesday, March 16 at 12 noon ET
    Title: Decoupling of the temperature-nutrient relationship in the California Current Ecosystem with global warming
    Speakers: Dr. Ryan R. Rykaczewski and Dr. John P. Dunne, NOAA Research Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL)
    Abstract: In the California Current Ecosystem (CCE), an inverse relationship between temperature and nitrate is evident over the observational period at interannual to decadal time scales. This robust relationship has encouraged use of temperature as a proxy for nutrient content and allowed extension of nutrient time series backwards in time over multiple decades. Understanding of this relationship has also been extrapolated to suggest that nutrient supply to the euphotic zone of the CCE will be inhibited in the future as the pycnocline strengthens with global warming, and primary and secondary production are expected to decrease in response to decreased nutrient supply. Here, we explore the effect of global warming on the production and nutrient supply of the CCE using a basic biogeochemistry model (TOPAZ) coupled to an ocean-atmosphere general circulation model (GFDL CM 2.1). We find that nutrient supply to the euphotic zone and primary production in the CCE increase as surface ocean temperatures rise. The mechanism relating physical factors to production at multi-decadal to centennial periods differs from that at shorter time scales, and the interannual and multidecadal relationship between nitrate and temperature should not be extrapolated to predict the response of the CCE to global warming. Although contrary to the traditional understanding of interannual and decadal variability in the CCE, this result is consistent with trends in the longest observations of chlorophyll content, nutrient content, and water clarity (as a proxy for chlorophyll content) which show that production has increased over the past 30 to 40 years despite an increase in surface temperatures. We find that the increase in nutrients in the euphotic zone of the CCE is the result of changes in the nutrient content and ventilation of the deep source waters to the region rather than a change in the rate of upwelling, mixed layer depth, or horizontal advection in the surface layers. This change is a consequence of increased stratification and weaker atmospheric circulation over the subtropical gyre. In addition to the long-term increase in primary production, increased temporal and spatial variability in production are predicted in the CCE. Further consideration of the ramifications of such changes to fisheries is warranted.
    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.

    Thursday, March 18 at 12 noon ET
    Title: The new NOAA Climate Services line office
    Speaker: Mary Glackin, Deputy Under Secretary
    Powerpoint slides (pdf format)
    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.

    Wednesday, March 24 at 12 noon ET
    Title: Marine conservation on the high seas: strategies to move forward with limited knowledge
    Speaker: Jeffrey Ardron, Director, High Seas Program, Marine Conservation Biology Institute (MCBI)
    Powerpoint slides (pdf format)
    Abstract: In this presentation, an overview of international developments in high seas conservation will be provided. Examples of ongoing scientific research / analyses relevant in applying various internationally-accepted conservation planning criteria will be provided, as well as opportunities and challenges ahead.
    Working in the high seas, it is impossible not to be faced with issues surrounding incomplete data / knowledge, and how we can make decisions in such situations. Of course, to various extents, incomplete knowledge of ecosystems plagues the daily lives of marine conservation scientists, practitioners and decision-makers everywhere, and there is little sign that this will change soon... So, how do we balance the need to know with the need to act? Addressing ever-mounting environmental problems requires moving beyond habitually calling for more sectoral research, laudable though that may be, to learning how to deal collaboratively with what little we’ve got. In this part of the presentation, I would like to put forward some preliminary ideas developing as part of a collaborative research effort with James Cook University (Australia) on “adaptive Maritime Spatial Planning” (aMSP).
    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.

    Thursday, March 25 at 12 noon ET
    Title: Overview of Dr. Spinrad's Career with NOAA: Challenges, Opportunities
    Speaker: Dr. Richard W. Spinrad, Assistant Administrator for Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR)
    Powerpoint slides (pdf format)
    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.

    Tuesday, March 30 at 12 noon ET
    Title: The Kittlitz’s Murrelet: Alaska's Next Polar Bear or a Total Misunderstanding?
    Speaker: Scott Gende, National Park Service, Glacier Bay Field Station, Juneau, Alaska
    Abstract: The Kittlitz’s murrelet (KIMU) is one of the rarest seabirds in North America, found only in Alaska and the Russian Far East. Historical population estimates are highly variable due in part to difficulties in monitoring this species: typical counts at nesting colonies do not work for this species because they are solitary nesters. What’s more KIMU are small and roost on the water which has resulted in imprecise or biased at-sea abundance estimates. Nevertheless, best estimates suggest a range-wide population decline of up to 84% over the past several decades provoking the USFWS to upgrade the species to a Candidate 2 listing priority under the Endangered Species Act. They are also considered “critically endangered” (IUCN Red List 2006). Because KIMU are closely associated with glacial habitats there is speculation that global climate change and loss of glacial habitat may be linked to population declines. However, because so little is known about this species, causal factors associated with the declines are highly speculative.
    For the past five years we have been studying Kittlitz’s murrelets in and adjacent to Wrangell-St. Elias National Park, southeastern Alaska. This area, combined with Glacier Bay National Park supports upwards of 15-20% of the global population of this species, with Icy Bay, adjacent to Wrangell-St.Elias, supporting the highest density of KIMU found in the world. Each of these areas is characterized by large glacial habitats, tidewater glaciers, and early successional landscapes. At the onset of this project less than 25 nests of this species had ever been found, with only a subset of those scientifically investigated. Less than 20 individuals had been captured and radio-tagged with very little known with regards to even their most basic life-history (movements, habitat use, nesting ecology, population structure, etc). Not surprisingly the Birds of North America consider the Kittlitz’s murrelet one of the least know species that breeds in North America.
    We have since captured over 300 Kittlitz’s murrelets and radio tagged and tracked over 100 individuals from 205-2009. Eight nests have been found, some as far as 4500’ in elevation over hanging glaciers; all have been in early successional habitats. Nesting attempts and success in this area appears to be very low, despite very little direct anthropogenic impacts. At several nests we placed cameras capturing footage of behavior rarely, if ever, recorded for this species. Perhaps more importantly, adult survival during the breeding season may be strongly influenced by predation rates from several raptor species. The uncertainty in factors driving abundance, their implications for management, and possible mechanisms by which climate change may (or may not) be a major driver in population dynamics will be discussed.
    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.

    Wednesday, March 31 at 12 noon ET
    Title: "Ross Sea, the Last Ocean: a Multimedia Presentation"
    Speaker: Dr. David Ainley, Senior Marine Wildlife Ecologist, H. T. Harvey & Associates
    Abstract: The recent analysis of anthropogenic alteration of the world ocean by Halpern et al. (2009, Science) identified the Ross Sea, Antarctica, as the least affected stretch of open ocean on the planet. A compilation of interviews of noted scientists and splendid imagery tells the Ross Sea story, and the story of efforts to set it aside as a marine reserve under the Antarctic Treaty.
    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.

    Thursday, April 1
    Title: Key to Submitting a Successful AAAS Symposium Proposal
    Speaker: Carolyn Sotka, Senior Science-Policy Analyst, NOAA’s OHHI (NOS)
    Powerpoint slides (pdf format)
    Abstract: To provide guidance on how to submit successful symposia to AAAS, Carolyn Sotka with NOAA’s Oceans and Human Health Initiative (OHHI) will share what factors need to be considered in order to develop a strong symposium proposal.
    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.

    Thursday, April 1 at 12 noon ET
    Title: The Hydrographic Survey Meta Data Base (HSMDB)
    Speaker: Mr. Daniel Neumann, NOAA Office of Coast Survey
    Abstract: NOAA and its predecessor agencies have completed over 16,300 hydrographic surveys, dating back to 1837. Digital metadata capture from these surveys began in 1997 with the inception of the hydrographic survey descriptive report preservation project. Metadata recovered from the hydrographic survey descriptive reports was entered into a database implemented in DB3, and subsequently migrated to Microsoft Access. Metadata was gradually expanded to reflect the how, where and why of each survey. Migration to a new Oracle platform was achieved in 2004, through a partnership with the National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC). Since 2004, hydrographic survey metadata presentation and query has increased in sophistication to the present day offerings on the NGDC Map Service Web Browser. The newest metadata product is the Hydrographic Survey Rap Sheet, a user-friendly summary metadata view which came on line in late January of 2010 and is now available for surveys from 1982 to the present. This brown bag seminar illustrates how to access NOAA’s hydrographic survey metadata and data through the NGDC site.
    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.

    Tuesday, April 6 at 12 noon ET
    Title: "Financial Blunders; Lessons We Can't Afford Not To Learn"
    Speaker: Jonathan Lee, President, Society for Financial Awareness (SOFA)
    Abstract: Learn the top financial mistakes most Americans make and how to aviod them, increase your wealth by hundreds of thousands of dollars with this simple technique, keep more of your money in your pocket and away from Uncle Sam, and many more practical and useful tools.
    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.

    Thursday, April 15 at 12 noon ET
    Title: "Characterization of Water Reflectance Spectra Variability: Implications for Hyperspectral Remote Sensing in Estuary Waters"
    Speaker: Dr. Chunlei Fan, Morgan State University
    Powerpoint sllides (pdf format)
    Abstract: A series of airborne hyperspectral remote sensing campaigns were conducted from 2002 to 2005 at five U.S. estuaries: Apalachicola Bay, FL; ACE basin, SC; Grand Bay, MS; Delaware Bay, DE; and Chesapeake Bay, MD. 151 field stations were occupied within the flight tracts where the following were obtained: (1) water reflectance R(λ) spectra were acquired by a pair of ocean optic 2000 spectroradiometers, simultaneously, the concentration of (2) chlorophyll a and (3) total suspended solid, and the (4) absorption of colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) were measured at these stations. A principal component analysis was conducted to characterize the general variability of these water reflectance R(λ) spectra, and explore the factors that drive the variability of water reflectance in optically complex coastal environments. The results suggested that water reflectance spectra in turbid estuarine waters are the results of complex interactions of phytoplankton pigments, total suspended solids, and CDOM. The first principal component, which represents 72% of total variance of R(λ), is strongly affected by scattering of total suspended solids and the absorption of CDOM at the green region of spectra; while the second principal component represents 20% of total variation of R(λ) spectra is mainly driven by phytoplankton biomass e.g. Chl a concentrations in red and near infrared spectral regions. Furthermore, the results of this study could provide a framework for using hyperspectral remote sensing as a cost effective method to characterize water quality in optically complex coastal waters.
    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.

    Monday, April 19, 2010 at 12 noon ET
    Title: The role of tourism in fisheries crises: the case of Newfoundland and applications to Maine
    Speaker: Natalie Springuel, Marine Extension Agent with Maine Sea Grant
    Powerpoint slides (pdf format)
    Abstract: Tourism is increasingly touted as a development opportunity for coastal and rural areas affected by natural resource decline. As commercial fisheries face depletion the world over, people look to tourism to help coastal communities recover from economic crisis, but little work has been done to explore if the investment in tourism can ever replace the full human ecological value of the fishery, including its impacts on a region’s culture, economy, and environment. Springuel's sabbatical in Newfoundland examined the impact of the 1992 cod moratorium on Newfoundland's coastal communities over the last 16 years, and particularly how marine heritage tourism has emerged as a model in the province's revitalization attempts. Dozens of interviews with Newfoundlanders involved in tourism and fisheries (including current and former fisherman and fish plant workers, boat captains, tour operators, community development and government representatives, residents, community leaders, academics, and front line staff at tourism destinations, visitor centers and museums) and first hand observations of marine tourism destinations show that marine heritage, in particular, has contributed to both the revitalization of devastated outports and the rise of tourism in these coastal communities. Though tourism will never replace an exhausted natural resource, it can play an important role in the future of coastal and rural areas. Maine’s reliance on a single marine fishery (lobster) mirrors Newfoundland’s reliance on cod. This presentation will highlight the Newfoundland experience and touch on how lessons learned can be applied in Maine.
    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.

    Tuesday, April 20 at 12 noon ET
    Title: "Is NOAA for the Birds? An Overview of NOAA Fisheries National Seabird Program."
    Speaker: Kim Rivera, National Seabird Coordinator, NOAA Fisheries
    Is NOAA for the Birds? An Overview of NOAA Fisheries National Seabird Program (pdf format)
    Abstract: Several of NOAA’s Fisheries Science Centers and Regional Offices have been working on a broad suite of seabird issues since the early 1980’s. This work involves seabird bycatch monitoring and reporting, coordination with other Federal Agencies (US Fish and Wildlife Service and US Geological Survey), addressing Endangered Species Act issues, and collaborative work (with industry and academia) to develop seabird bycatch reduction approaches. Some work also explored or described the role of seabirds in marine ecosystems and how they quickly respond to changes in the ocean environment. Seabird work was being developed independently at several sites and with few resources. The need for coordination, continued international work, and development of funding sources led to the establishment of a National Seabird Program in 2001. With very limited resources, the program supports studies on fisheries bycatch of seabirds and the development of solutions to mitigate and reduce fishing gear impacts on seabirds both domestically and internationally. The program is also expanding its scope to provide better support to Regions and Centers in their work to understand seabirds exclusive of bycatch issues. We know that seabirds are important indicators of marine ecosystem health. Seabird distribution and abundance can reflect physical and biological oceanography, abundance and distribution of mid trophic-level organisms, and the effects of climate change on apex predators. Contaminant levels in seabirds can provide insight into the health of a particular ecosystem. And, unlike so many marine organisms, seabirds are relatively easy and cost-effective to sample. With the ever increasing recognition of the vital role seabirds have within the marine ecosystem, and the continued importance of bycatch monitoring and mitigation, NOAA scientists and managers acknowledge the need for continued support of seabird studies. This brown bag seminar will offer highlights of some of the key activities of the NOAA Fisheries’ Seabird Program, including describing some of its projects, as well as touching on other seabird work within NOAA.
    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.

    Wednedsday, April 21 at 12 noon ET
    Title: Resume Writing Workshop
    Speaker: Charly L. Wells, Director, National Weather Service Office of Equal Opportunity and Diversity Management
    Powerpoint slides (pdf format)
    Abstract: With 32 years of Federal service as an EEO specialist working with Upward Mobility, disability issues, counseling, investigations, community outreach, and many other aspects of EEO, the Weather Service's Charly Wells has the knowledge and experience to help you win that job!
    This brownbag is sponsored by the NOAA Fisheries Employee Worklife and Diversity Committee, Professional Development Subcommittee
    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.

    Wednesday, April 28, 2010 at 12 noon ET
    Speakers: Mandy Lindeberg, NMFS, Alaska Fisheries Science Center; Steve Lewis, NMFS, Alaska Region; Cindy Hartmann Moore, NMFS, Alaska Region
    Title: An Introduction to ShoreZone Coastal Habitat Mapping and the Nearshore Fish Atlas of Alaska
    Powerpoint slides (pdf format)
    Abstract: This seminar will describe the Alaska ShoreZone coastal habitat imaging and mapping project: what it is, how to access it, and what practical applications it serves. This seminar will also present the Nearshore Fish Atlas database and demonstrate the integrated ShoreZone/Fish Atlas web site.
    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.

    Tuesday, May 11, 2010 at 12 noon ET
    Title: Quantifying Ecosystem Interactions of a FLUPY-Based Oyster Nursery

  • Quantifying Ecosystem Interactions of a FLUPSY-Based Oyster Nursery (pdf format)

  • Speakers: Mark S. Dixon, Yaqin Li, and April N. Croxton, NOAA Northeast Fishery Science Center Milford Lab
    Abstract: Increasing global demand for seafood is being, and will continue to be, met by increased aquaculture production. Suspension-feeding shellfish, a premium aquaculture product, obtain nutrition directly from phytoplankton primary production and are considered to have environmental benefits beyond human food value. Relatively-recent innovations, Floating Upwelling Systems (FLUPSYs) are now a common and important component of many shellfish-aquaculture operations. A FLUPSY is an in-situ nursery system designed to increase water flow, and therefore microalgal food delivery, to post-set shellfish. Typically the system is incorporated into a floating dock array and deployed in a productive, coastal waterway. The widespread use of FLUPSYs is a testament to their success. The placement of FLUPSYs, however, leads to questions about their potential impacts -- negative, neutral, or ecosystem service -- upon the local environment. This presentation will include preliminary results of this study, including methodologies that are transferable to other aquaculture settings.
    This OneNOAA Science Seminar is sponsored by the NOAA Aquaculture Program and the NOAA Central Library.
    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.

    Wednesday, May 12, 2010 at 12 noon ET
    Title: The Pacific Sardine (Sardinops sagax) Fishery: Federal Regulation Alternatives
    Speaker: Karen Carlson, Sea Grant Knauss Fellow, Program Planning and Integration Office
    Download: View the PowerPoint slides(pdf) or the WebEx Recording(wrf format, requires you to download the free WRF player).
    Abstract: The largest volume fishery in the Western Hemisphere, Pacific sardine (Sardinops sagax) has collapsed and rebounded to levels now considered well-managed utilizing sustainable fishing practices. Recent scientific egg surveys suggest the fishery is entering another decline while fishermen report large schools of sardines in higher latitudes.
    The sardine industry is primarily a high-volume, low-value export industry with low domestic food value. Declining quotas and increased competition are putting pressure on the viability of high volume sardine fishermen and bulk export processors.
    Four alternatives are explored in the paper: #1 Status Quo – continue with Harvest Guideline rule and tri-annual percentages with quotas closures. #2 Short-Term – initiate permit equity between the regions, add a domestic catch allowance, #3 Catch Shares - Individual Transferable Quotas (ITQ) and #4 Catch Shares - Community Property Rights (CPR). Regulations are needed which reduce regional rivalry and encourage industry innovations to adjust to lower volume catch.
    Note: This seminar is part of the Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Series
    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.

    Wednesday, May 12, 2010 at 12:30pm ET
    Title: "Reactive iron in the Alaska Coastal Current and a Kenai Eddy in the Gulf of Alaska: the delivery of iron to high-nutrient, lower than expected chlorophyll waters"
    Speaker: Sherry Lippiatt, NOAA Marine Debris Program, Sea Grant Knauss Fellow
    Download: View the PowerPoint slides(pdf), or the WebEx Recording(wrf format, requires you to download the free WRF player).
    Abstract: Coastal waters in the northern Gulf of Alaska (GoA) are considered iron-rich and nitrate-poor, in contrast to the iron-poor high nutrient, lower than expected chlorophyll (HNLC) waters of the central GoA. The degree of mixing between these two regimes is essential to the high productivity observed in the GoA. In the Alaska Coastal Current, suspended leachable particulate Fe is available for exchange to the dissolved phase and is suggested to maintain a relatively constant (~ 2 nM) source of dissolved Fe. Kenai Eddy core water reactive Fe concentrations were up to 15 times greater than basin waters, reflective of the eddy’s coastal origin. GoA eddies can be a source of Fe to HNLC waters when they propagate into the central GoA and eventually relax or rebound. This work emphasizes the importance of considering the leachable particulate Fe phase, in addition to dissolved Fe, when quantifying biologically available Fe in coastal regions.
    Note: This seminar is part of the Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Series
    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.

    Wednesday, May 19, 2010 at 12 noon ET
    Title: NMFS's Voices from the Fisheries Project
    Speaker: Susan Abbott-Jamieson, Ph.D., Senior Social Scientist, NOAA Fisheries (NMFS)
    View the Powerpoint Slides (pdf format) or the WebEx Recording (wrf format, requires you to download the free WRF player).
    Abstract: The Voices from the Fisheries Database (VFF Database) is a unique resource available to the public to inform, educate, and provide primary information for research for all who are interested in our local, human experience with the surrounding marine and Great Lakes environment. The Voices from the Fisheries Oral History Project builds its collection in two ways: 1) by locating existing collections and persuading their owners to donate copies, and 2) by encouraging the collection of new oral histories for donation. This presentation describes the project in detail. Initial support for the VFF Project came from a NOAA Preserve America Initiative Grant and continued support has come from the NOAA Fisheries Office of Science and Technology.
    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.

    Tuesday, May 25, 2010 at 12 noon ET
    Speaker: David Helvarg, President of the Blue Frontier Campaign
    Abstract: Long time ocean enthusiast, journalist and founder of the Blue Frontier Campaign (http://www.bluefront.org) David Helvarg talks about his life's journey to the sea as told in his latest book, Saved by the Sea: A Love Story with Fish. From bodysurfing Central American war zones, diving barrier reefs with his tragically fated love Nancy, or being bumped by a whale off Antarctica Helvarg has lived a life often as endangered as the ocean he now works to protect. The journey he recounts over the last half-century is a profound, startling and sometimes surprisingly funny reflection on the state of our seas and the intimate ways in which our lives are all linked to the natural world around us. According to Henry David Thoreau "Heaven is under our feet as well as over our heads." According to Helvarg it's also under our flippers.
    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.

    Wednesday, May 26, 2010 at 12 noon ET
    Title: The Black Swan Shipwreck Case
    Speaker: Jim Goold, Of Counsel, Covington and Burling LLP
    Powerpoint slides (pdf format)
    Abstract: Mr. Goold will tell us about the process by which Spain investigated the report and prosecuted legal action in the United District Court in Tampa that led to a December 2009 ruling for Spain that the site is the Mercedes, a Spanish Navy Frigate that exploded and sank in the October 1804 Battle of Cape Saint Mary, and that, as the "natural and legal patrimony" of Spain, the ship and its contents are protected by sovereign immunity from unauthorized disturbance. Odyssey Marine Exploration, Inc. v. Unidentified, Shipwrecked Vessel, 675 F.Supp.2d 1126 (M.D.Fla. 2009). The district court has ordered Odyssey to return to Spanish custody all artifacts taken from the site. The case is now on appeal, with Odyssey, the Republic of Peru and five groups of individuals who claim to be descendants of persons who owned property on the Mercedes, all seeking to overturn the district court ruling. The United States Department of Justice with the support of NOAA and the State Department filed a "friend of the court" brief supportive of Spain's legal position in the district court litigation and is likely to do so again in the appeal.
    Sponsored by NOAA Office of General Council International Affairs
    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.

    Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 12 noon ET
    Title: Upper-Air Temperature Trends: History of a Controversy
    Speaker: Dian J. Seidel, NOAA Air Resources Laboratory (R/ARL)
    Powerpoint slides (pdf format)
    View the WebEx Recording of the Seminar (wrf format, requires you to download the free WRF player).
    Abstract: Changes in the vertical profile of atmospheric temperature have a particular importance in climate change research, because climate models have long predicted a distinctive response to increases in greenhouse gases and stratospheric ozone changes. Twenty years ago, analysis of a ten-yr record of satellite observations of tropospheric temperature by Spencer and Christy (Science, 1990) found no evidence of warming, calling into question the credibility of observations of surface temperature increases and the validity of climate model simulations. These issues have spurred both a long-running scientific controversy and a considerable body of scientific research. This seminar will survey the evolution of our understanding of upper-air temperature trends from the 1970s to present. Both theoretical and observational advances will be reviewed, with a focus on major concepts rather than on technical details. A fresh perspective on the controversy will be provided by addressing both tropospheric and stratospheric temperature trend studies, which have some common issues as well as some significantly different challenges. Lessons learned and approaches for future progress will be discussed.
    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.

    Wednesday, June 9, 2010 at 12 noon ET
    Title: "Tracing Planktonic Colonization and Community Structure in Freshwater Lakes from Paleoecological Records"
    Speaker: Mike Allen, Sea Grant Knauss Fellow, OAR Office of Laboratories and Cooperative Institutes
    Powerpoint slides (pdf format)
    Abstract: When multiple new habitats are created, community assembly may follow independent trajectories, since the relative importance of dispersal limitation, priority effects, species interactions, and environmental gradients changes as assembly proceeds. Unfortunately, tracking community colonization and composition across decades is challenging. We compiled a multiyear community composition dataset using planktonic water column samples and reconstructed past communities with remains from sediment cores to investigate cladoceran assembly dynamics in six older (1920s) and two more recently formed (1950s) lakes. We found that current communities cluster along a stratification gradient related to predation intensity. Assembling communities showed evidence for a greater influence of species sorting and a reduced influence of spatial structure since the first colonizations. However, lake colonization sequences and community trajectories varied considerably, reflecting the influence of the earliest colonizers on changing community composition through time. In the older lakes, small-bodied cladocerans often arrived much earlier than large-bodied cladocerans, while the two younger lakes were colonized much more rapidly, and one was quickly dominated by a large-bodied species. Thus, by combining contemporary community data with paleoecological records, we show that assembly history influences natural community structure for decades while patterns of ecological sorting develop.
    Note: This seminar is part of the Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Series
    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.

    Wednesday, June 9, 2010 at 12:30pm ET
    Title: A Social Landscape Analysis of Land Use Decision Making in the Towns of the Lamprey River Watershed
    Speaker: Erika Washburn, Sea Grant Knauss Fellow, NOAA International Affairs
    Powerpoint slides (pdf format)
    Abstract: This presentation discusses the results of dissertation research funded through a NOAA Social Science Fellowship in coastal New Hampshire. This region has experienced substantial population increase which has resulted in land use decisions contributing to increased impervious surfaces, sprawl and deteriorating water quality in the Great Bay estuarine system. A mixed qualitative methodology will be presented which examined the landscape of decision making and the potential for moving towards an EBM, watershed-scaled spatial planning approach.
    Note: This seminar is part of the Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Series
    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.

    Wednesday, June 16, 2010 at 11:15 AM ET
    Title: Coastal Louisiana Habitats: Problems, Issues and Opportunities
    Speaker: Richard (Rick) Hartman, Fishery Biologist and Team Leader, NOAA Fisheries SE Region, Habitat Field Office, Baton Rouge, LA
    Powerpoint slides not available
    Abstract: This presentation discusses NOAA’s regional efforts in coastal Louisiana in response to hurricanes, wetland loss, and the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill. Emphasis will be on post-Katrina/Rita hurricane protection efforts, wetland restoration programs under the Coastal Wetlands Planning, Protection and Restoration Act (CWPPRA), and the Louisiana Coastal Area Program, the Roadmap for Restoring Ecosystem Resiliency and Sustainability, and how these programs fit into the scheme of things. Other civil works programs will be discussed including the Louisiana State request for a barrier berm to block oil movement in the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill.
    Note: This seminar is part of the NOAA Fisheries, Office of Habitat Conservation Brown Bag Series
    Note: This semiar will be held in Room 4527, on the 4th floor of SSMC-3. Remote access will NOT be available.

    Wednesday, June 16, 2010 at 12:30 PM ET
    Title: "Hurricanes in Maryland"
    Speaker: Rick Schwartz, author of Hurricanes in the Mid-Atlantic States No powerpoint available
    Abstract: This presentation will explore local hurricane risks in the Mid-Atlantic region including high winds, flooding in tidal sections, flash and generalized flooding and tornadoes. Hurricanes Hazel, Camille and Agnes are just a few of the storms examined. Characteristics, as well as similarities and differences of the "big ones," will be discussed and illustrated by track maps and photographs. The region's hurricane history portends what might be expected in the future.
    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.

    Thursday, June 17, 2010 at 12 noon ET
    Title: Using sensory cues to reduce sea turtle and shark interactions with fishing gear
    Speakers: John H. Wang and Melanie Hutchinson, University of Hawaii – Joint Institute of Marine and Atmospheric Research; Shara Fisler, Ocean Discovery Institute, San Diego, CA; and Yonat Swimmer, NOAA- Pacific Island Fisheries Science Center, Honolulu, HI
    Powerpoint slides (pdf format)
    Abstract: Many sea turtle and shark populations are in decline. Bycatch in fisheries has been implicated as a significant source of mortality and subsequently as source of these population decreases. Recent studies have raised concerns regarding the high rates of incidental capture and mortality of sea turtles in coastal gill net fisheries as well as the high rates of mortality of shark species in longline fisheries. A variety of sensory cues play important roles in the behaviors of target species and bycatch species. These cues most likely influence their interactions with fishing gear. As such, altering these cues may be a useful strategy to reduce the incidental catch of sea turtles in various fisheries.
    We examined the potential effectiveness of three visual cues in reducing green sea turtle interactions with nets: shark shapes, nets illuminated by LED lights, and nets illuminated with chemical lightsticks. We then adapted these potential deterrents into commercial bottom gill net fishery to quantify their effects on target fish catch rates and the catch value. Our results indicate that the presence of shark shapes significantly reduced the mean catch rates of green turtles by 54% but also reduced target catch and catch value. In contrast, nets illuminated by LED lights significantly reduced mean sea turtle catch rates by 40% while having negligible impacts on target catch and catch value. Similarly, nets illuminated by chemical lightsticks also significantly reduced mean sea turtle catch rates by 60% while having no significant impact on target catch and catch value. These results illustrate the potential for modifying fishing gear with visual deterrents to effectively reduce sea turtle catch rates.
    Sharks and other elasmobranches can detect minute electric fields. We conducted two experiments to test the ability of electropositive metals to deter sharks from feeding. In one experiment we utilized a shark-viewing cage to film and observe choice experiments with Galapagos (Carcharhinus galapagensis) and sandbar sharks (Carcharhinus plumbeus). Results indicate that bait associated with lead metal was eaten over bait associated with electropositive metal. In addition, sharks exhibited more aversion behaviors as they approached bait associated with the electropositive metal. In a second study, we conducted paired fishing experiments to determine the effects of Nd/Pr (Neodymiun/Praseodymium) alloy on the catch rates of sharks on bottom set longline gear. Preliminary results from longline field trials in Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii suggest that catch rates of juvenile scalloped hammerhead sharks (Sphyrna lewini) are reduced when a Nd/Pr weight is attached to the branchline. Taken together, these results suggest that electropositive metals do influence feeding behavior in sharks and could be potentially used to reduce the incidental capture of sharks in longline fisheries.
    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.

    Wednesday, June 30, 2010 at 12 noon ET
    Title: Influence of Habitat and Life History of Reef Fish on the Effectiveness of a Network of Marine Protected Areas to Replenish Aquarium Fish
    Speaker: Delisse Ortiz, Sea Grant Knauss Fellow, NMFS Office of Sustainable Fisheries
    Powerpoint slides (pdf format)
    Abstract: Identifying and incorporating habitats important to vulnerable life stages of reef fish is necessary for the effective design and management of Marine Protected Areas (MPAs). However, data on habitat requirements for most fish species are very limited, hindering the efficacy of MPAs to protect targeted fish species. Dr. Ortiz’s research examines the ontogenetic patterns of habitat use by reef-fish and provides information whereby the effectiveness of a well-studied MPA network can be evaluated relative to the distribution and abundance of habitats important to aquarium fish species in Hawaii.
    Note: This seminar is part of the Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Series
    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.

    Wednesday, June 30, 2010 at 12:30 PM ET
    Title: Feeding and growth rates among native and non-native apple snails (Ampullariidae) in the United States
    Speaker: Wendy Morrison, Sea Grant Knauss Fellow, NMFS Office of Sustainable Fisheries
    Powerpoint slides (pdf format)
    Abstract: The United States hosts one native and five non-native species of aquatic apple snails, with all species currently located in or around the Everglades ecosystem in South Florida. These introduced apple snails have devastated wetlands in Southeast Asia, but little is known about their impact on the Everglades. To evaluate potential impacts of introduced apple snails, we investigated plant preference, consumption rates, growth rates, and growth efficiencies for four introduced and one native species across six to eight aquatic plants native to South Florida. Three of the non-native snails are invasive, one has shown no tendency to expand (innocuous), and one has minimal impact on macrophytes due to its diet. All macrophyte consuming snails exhibited similar feeding preference, with Utricularia being the highest preference, Bacopa, Sagitaria, and Nymphaea being intermediate preference, and Eleocharis, Pontederia, Panicum and Typha being avoided. The invasive species Pomacea insularum and P. canaliculata tended to eat more, grow more, and have higher conversion efficiencies than the native species P. paludosa or the non-invasive P. haustrum. These contrasts were more often significant for P. insularum than for P. canaliculata. Consumption and growth were minimal for P. diffusa on all macrophytes; this species is mainly an algivore. In general, invasives showed greater rates of feeding and growth, and sometimes increased efficiency, compared to native and innocuous non-native species - suggesting a mechanism for greater rates of expansion by invasive species.
    Note: This seminar is part of the Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Series
    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.

    Wednesday, July 14, 2010 at 12 noon ET
    Title: Monitoring and Modeling Water Quality in an Urban Watershed
    Speaker: Keith Cialino, Sea Grant Knauss Fellow, National Marine Fisheries Service Office of International Affairs
    Powerpoint slides (pdf format)
    Abstract: This presentation will discuss a research plan for conducting high resolution sampling within a watershed to assess the influence of stormwater runoff on water quality. The research project intends to: create an adaptive monitoring network in a watershed to capture rain events; integrate hydrological flows and water quality information into a predictive watershed model; and extend these approaches to a second urban watershed/estuary to determine the validity of the approach. Ways to communicate the results of the research to decision makers will also be discussed.
    Note: This seminar is part of the Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Series
    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.

    Wednesday, July 14, 2010 at 12:30pm ET
    Title: Willingness-to-Pay for Ecosystem Services: Do Payment Elicitation Mechanisms Matter?
    Speaker: Jacky Haskell, Sea Grant Knauss Fellow, Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research
    Powerpoint slides (pdf format)
    Abstract: Many ecosystem services, such as wildlife habitat and scenic views, are examples of public goods that may be produced by private landowners. These landowners privately manage their property and may face an opportunity cost if they choose to enhance ecosystem services. Many payments for ecosystem services programs exist, but few have attempted to transfer private payments from consumers to producers; as a result, ecosystem services frequently are not provided at levels that would most benefit society. One solution to this problem is to create a market for ecosystem services. This study employs a stated preference choice experiment framework to examine the tradeoffs between forest ecosystem services in Rhode Island and to compare the performance of payment elicitation mechanisms that can be used in a market for ecosystem services.
    Note: This seminar is part of the Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Series
    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.

    Monday, July 19, 2010 at 12 noon ET
    Title: Atlantic – Pacific Relationships of Deep-Sea Octocorals
    Speaker: Les Watling, Professor of Zoology, University of Hawaii at Manoa
    Abstract: We have been sampling deep-sea octocorals in the Atlantic since 2001 and in the Pacific since 1995. Samples were first obtained on an opportunistic basis, but since 2003 our expeditions have been funded by NOAA Ocean Exploration in the Atlantic, and the Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument and the National Marine Fisheries Service in the Pacific. All octocorals obtained are preserved for both molecular and morphological analysis. Early on we noticed the genetic signature of some gorgonians from the Atlantic were very similar to others from off Hawaii. Morphologically, these specimens were almost indistinguishable. We now have documented a large number of these sister taxa in several families. Most represent undescribed species. Hypotheses explaining the existence of these sister taxa will be offered and evaluated. The most promising explanation involves understanding palaeo-circulation of deep water in the Atlantic and Pacific and the fate of the land mass separating them.
    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.

    Wednesday, July 21, 2010 at 12 noon ET
    Title: The Maritime Industry: Friend or Foe?
    Speaker: Kathy Metcalf, Director of Maritime Affairs, Chamber of Shipping of America
    Powerpoint slides (pdf format)
    Abstract: This presentation will discuss topics where the American Chamber of Shipping and NOAA have worked collaboratively to reach a common agreed-upon goal, such as with respect to ballast water management, particularly sensitive sea areas, North Atlantic right whale ship strike avoidance measures, marine debris and commercial shipping noise.
    Note: This seminar is sponsored by the NOAA International Law Office of General Counsel
    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.

    Wednesday, July 28, 2010 at 12 noon ET
    Title: MOLECULAR PHYSIOLOGY AND STRESS RESPONSES OF THE PACIFIC WHITE SHRIMP, Litopenaeus vannamei: IMPACTS OF HYPOXIA AND HYPERCAPNIC HYPOXIA
    Speaker: Kolo Rathburn, Sea Grant Knauss Legislative Fellow
    Powerpoint slides (pdf format)
    Abstract: Many crustaceans inhabit estuarine ecosystems where they are frequently exposed to hypoxia (H) and elevated levels of CO2 (hypercapnia). These factors may impair the ability of crustaceans to maintain optimal metabolic processes and immune defense. Marine crustaceans employ various tactics to cope with environmental hypoxia and hypercapnia, which can require changes in biochemistry such as altered activities and concentrations of metabolic enzymes. Furthermore, by regulating their gene expression marine crustaceans may coordinate specific and general stress responses to H and hypercapnic H (HH) which may include metabolic depression. The molecular mechanisms that underlie these responses to H and HH stress in marine crustaceans are poorly understood. This study set out to determine the impacts of moderate H and HH on the basic physiology of the Pacific white shrimp, L. vannamei. We tested the hypothesis that H and HH elicit down-regulation of genes associated with metabolic depression, specifically protein synthesis and transcription, as well as immune defense. Shrimp were held in H, HH, or normoxia (N) for 4 h or 24 h. RNA from hepatopancreas of individual animals was hybridized to microarrays containing 21,864 unigenes expressed by L. vannamei. Transcriptional profiles of H and HH animals were compared to respective 4 and 24 h N controls. Genes involved in amino acid metabolism, RNA metabolism, and translation (including numerous tRNA synthetases) were down-regulated in 4 h H, 24 h H and 4 h HH shrimp. Few regulated genes could be assigned to immune defense, except for several in 24 h H shrimp, which included immune genes encoding crustins and penaeidins. Additionally, unique patterns of gene expression such as increased lipid metabolism and initiation of apoptosis were tied to specific treatments and times, revealing effects of duration and added CO2 stress in altering the transcriptome of L. vannamei. Overall, these results suggest that crustacean molecular responses to environmental changes in O2 and CO2 pressure involve both general and stress-specific gene sets, with characteristic shifts to metabolic depression. This work contributes insight to the effects human perturbations might have on estuarine organisms.
    Note: This seminar is part of the Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Series
    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.

    Wednesday, July 28, 2010 at 12:30pm ET
    Title: Measurement and modeling of multi-generational gene flow from transgenic to wild fish under varying environments
    Speaker: Kelly Pennington, Sea Grant Knauss Fellow, U.S. Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation
    Powerpoint slides (pdf format)
    Abstract: Transgenic fishes are nearing commercialization for aquaculture around the world. Farmed transgenic fish would likely escape from typical production facilities and interbreed with wild relatives. Models could help risk assessors predict the likelihood and consequences of transgene flow; however, predictions from existing models have not been confirmed using real populations of transgenic fish. We introduced growth-enhanced transgenic Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) and wild-type medaka into four environments: (A) high food availability, no predation; (B) high food availability, simulated predation; (C) low food availability, no predation; and (D) low food availability, simulated predation. We maintained 24 populations of wild-type and transgenic fish under these environments for approximately three generations and measured population size and frequency of transgenic fish at 210 days. In experimental populations, final transgenic population size was greater in Environment A than in all other Environments. The final frequency of transgenic fish in Environment A was greater than that in Environment C or D. Both models predicted that transgenic fish frequency in Environment A would be the highest, but also overestimated the frequency of transgenic fish compared to observed results. We created deterministic and stochastic versions of a demographic simulation model, parameterized with fitness trait values collected under the same environmental conditions, to predict frequency of transgenic fish under each environment, and compared observed results to model predictions. Models predicted transgenic fish frequencies that overlapped with observations in Environments B and C but not in the more extreme Environments A and D. Our results illustrate the danger of measuring fitness traits in one sterile environment to parameterize a deterministic model, and using model outcomes to inform risk assessment decisions. We recommend building uncertainty analysis into gene flow models, at least by incorporating parameter variability, and confirming model predictions with data collected under relevant environmental conditions before using such models to inform ecological risk assessments.
    Note: This seminar is part of the Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Series
    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.

    Wednesday, August 11, 2010 at 10:00 AM ET
    Title: Story Proof: The Science Behind the Power of Story
    Speaker: Kendall Haven
    Powerpoint slides (pdf format)
    Abstract: Storytelling is often described as “Best Practice” for science outreach communication. Effective stories change beliefs and attitudes. They sway popular and decision-maker opinions and mindset. But why? When compared to delivering the same information through other narrative structures, what is it about the form and structure of story that:

    • Makes people listen more attentively (pay attention),
    • Makes them understand information and concepts better,
    • Creates more accurate and personal meaning from information,
    • Creates relevance and context for story information and concepts,
    • Makes people remember information and concepts better and more accurately,
    • Helps people recall information out of memory more readily and accurately.

    Neural and psychological research over the past fifteen years has confirmed that story architecture accomplishes each of these feats.
    Two key questions emerge:
    1. Why?
    2. What does this research conclude that defines and characterizes the structure of effective stories?

    Finally (and most importantly) what does that mean for scientists who want to communicate their findings and results?
    This session explores what science has shown us about the explicit elements of effective story architecture and how to harness their communications power to make your points and case. Neural sciences have revealed an exacting and explicit definition for story architecture that links directly to how human brains and minds process incoming narrative information. In this session I will demonstrate both the elements and limits of that structure and lay out the process for using it to improve the success of science outreach communication.
    Specifically, attendees will receive:
    1. A summary of the science behind effective story structure: how does the human mind process incoming narrative information—and what does that mean for you and your message/information?
    2. The identify of, and a demonstration of, the Eight Essential Elements of story structure: what they are, what they do, and how you effectively use them to design, organize, and structure your communication.
    3. A brief review of the major misconceptions (myths) about story—that is, what a story Isn't (and why the word "story" carries such negative connotation—and yet, at the same time, generates such incredible allure and power).
    4. An introduction to why it is essential to consider the intended audience for each story
    5. An overview of the Process—how to effectively apply the core architectural elements of story to create memorable and powerful central themes and lasting images for your communication whether or not you formally “tell a story.”


    Note: This seminar will be held in the NOAA Science Center. For further information please contact LuAnn Dahlman.

    Wednesday, August 11, 2010 at 12 noon ET
    Title: Recruitment dynamics of a coral reef fish in the Florida Keys
    Speaker: Tauna Rankin, Sea Grant Knauss Fellow, Coral Reef Conservation Program
    Powerpoint slides (pdf format)
    Abstract: Processes that influence the early life stages of fishes can significantly impact population dynamics, yet they continue to be poorly understood. Knowledge of what mechanisms influence recruitment and subsequent juvenile survival may provide important information for predicting year-class strength. This dissertation examined relationships between the environment, early life history traits (ELHTs), behavior, and post-settlement survival for a coral reef fish, Stegastes partitus, in the upper Florida Keys. Otolith analysis of settlers and recruits coupled with environmental data revealed that S. partitus surviving the early juvenile period settled at larger sizes and grew slower post-settlement. Water temperature influenced these ELHTs as well as mortality. Behavioral observations of newly settled juveniles revealed that the relationship between size-at-settlement, early juvenile growth and survival is behaviorally-mediated. A six-year time series of recruitment densities revealed substantial temporal and spatial variability in recruitment. As a whole, these results reveal processes associated with larval supply and post-settlement life that collectively shape the composition of recruits.
    Note: This seminar is part of the Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Series
    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.

    Wednesday, August 11, 2010 at 12:30pm ET
    Title: The Inner Workings of a Market for Transferable Fishing Privileges in the Florida Spiny Lobster Fishery
    Speaker: Kari MacLauchlin, Sea Grant Knauss Fellow, NOAA Fisheries Office of Policy
    Powerpoint slides (pdf format)
    Abstract: With the national policy on catch shares in progress in the United States and increasing use of transferable fishing privileges in fisheries worldwide, it is important to understand how the markets created by these programs function in the real world. This paper, part of my dissertation research, presents information collected from interviews with Florida spiny lobster fishermen on how the market for transferable fishing privileges (called lobster trap certificates in this program) works, how they make decisions to buy and sell certificates, and their perceptions of the program. The interviews indicate that the fishermen participate in the market in ways we expect, but may be hindered by cultural and social differences that impede transfers; program provisions that affect decision-making in transfers; and the emergence of brokers in the market. The study also revealed how information about certificate prices and availability circulates within and between fishing communities, and how this affects the market and the outcomes of the program. When compared to results from previous analyses of transactions data, the interviews also provide information on validity of conclusions, and offers alternative explanations uncovered when the fishermen themselves explain the trap certificate market. The results of this paper suggest that management and regulating agencies should directly address these issues that could affect the market when developing and amending transferable fishing rights programs. Additionally, it exemplifies the importance of combining interviews with fishermen with economic analyses in monitoring and evaluation in order to gain a better understanding of how these programs work.
    Note: This seminar is part of the Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Series
    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.

    Thursday, August 12, 2010 at 10:00 AM
    Title: Seeing Climate, Seeing Change: Communicating Climate Science in a Changing Media Landscape
    Speaker: Heidi Cullen, CEO & Director of Communications of Climate Central
    Abstract: The past year brought major changes in the economic, political, and media landscapes. This talk will explore how recent events impacted the public’s perception of climate science as well as discuss the challenges and opportunities facing scientists and journalists as the media undergoes a large-scale transformation.
    Topics for discussion and hands-on practice will include new tools for science communication. Examples will be provided.
    Note: This seminar will be held in the NOAA Science Center. For further information please contact LuAnn Dahlman.
    Remote Access: Go to the Registration Page a few minutes before the seminar begins. Fill out the registration form and click on "Register Now". The passcode is: storyteller. Audio will be available over the internet.

    Thursday, August 19, 2010 at 12 noon ET
    Title: Living in Fear: An Individual Based Model of a killer whale-dusky dolphin behavioral game
    Speaker: Mridula Srinivasan, Program Manager/Marine Biologist, National Marine Fisheries Service
    Powerpoint slides (pdf format)
    View the WebEx Recording (wrf format, requires you to download the free WRF player).
    Abstract: Dolphins are apex predators, but occasionally they are prey to a more powerful predator like the killer whale (Orcinus orca). While killer whales may seek other prey, they can intimidate dolphins into making different lifestyle choices about when and where to rest, or when to feed. These anti-predator choices can occur because of predator threats rather than actual predator presence. Alternatively, due to heightened and imminent predation threat, dolphins may use drastic tactics to flee or hide to avoid a deadly encounter. Off Kaikoura, New Zealand, dusky dolphins (Lagenorhynchus obscurus) adopt short and long-term anti-predator strategies to avoid potential killer whale attacks. We developed a spatially explicit, individual-based model (IBM) to capture the dynamic behavioral interaction between a fierce predator and a scared prey, and to elucidate evolutionary costs vs. benefits of making anti-predator decisions. Despite species and habitat specific questions driving model development, the model can be adapted to different species and environments to answer complex ecological questions including predator-prey relationships.
    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.

    Wednesday, September 8, 2010 at 12 noon ET
    Title: Broader implications of voluntary participation in fisheries management: Does showing up matter?
    Speaker: Danielle Brzezinski, Sea Grant Knauss Fellow, Office of Senator Maria Cantwell (D - WA)
    Powerpoint slides (pdf format)
    View the WebEx Recording of the Seminar (wrf format, requires you to download the free WRF player).
    Abstract: Voluntary participation has troubled policy makers since Aristotle’s time. Its perceived benefits in input and policy acceptance make it highly attractive as a method to be used in management. The Fishery Conservation and Management Act of 1976 created a regional system of fishery governance and included opportunities for public participation, which lawmakers, like Senator Edward Kennedy, believed would provide these benefits of local knowledge for fisheries management. However, research has shown that participation tends to occur among those that are more financially-able and opinionated, producing a condition of overall low participation and nonparticipation of moderates. Coupled with the high costs of participation in time and monetary loss, the actual participant makeup is uncertain as to whether it fulfills the implicit assumptions of the law. I studied the overall trends of voluntary participation in the New England Fishery Management Council general meetings from 2003-06. Additionally, I analyzed and compared three key fisheries, the groundfish, herring, and scallop fisheries, for their differences in participation levels. I compared the spatial distributions of the industry’s attendees to that of its fishing permits and landings data. The attendee data showed a significant and negative relationship between number of attendees and distance traveled; however, no significant differences existed among the attendees and the industry distributions, except between the scallop permits and landings within New England down to the Washington, DC area. While temporal constraints limited the study, the methods present an opportunity to quantify the effects of a participating but non-voting population.
    Note: This seminar is part of the Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Series
    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.

    Wednesday, September 8, 2010 at 12:30 PM ET
    Title: Vertical distribution, transport, and delivery of barnacle larvae in the nearshore environment
    Speaker: Joe Tyburczy, Sea Grant Knauss Fellow, Office of Representative Mike Thompson (D - CA)
    Powerpoint slides (pdf format)
    Abstract: Understanding of processes that influence transport and settlement of marine larvae is invaluable for management and conservation, including the design and effects of marine protected areas. My dissertation research uses barnacles as a model organism and integrates biological and oceanographic sampling to investigate this important "black box." One key study was conducted in northern Monterey Bay, California in July-August 2007 as part of a large collaborative effort by the Partnership for Interdisciplinary Studies of Coastal Oceans (PISCO). Sampling included deployment of four acoustic Doppler current profilers and onshore settlement collectors at four sites, as well as depth-stratified larval traps on six moorings.
    Flux of mature larvae (cyprids) of one barnacle species (Balanus crenatus) was greatest at depth, and at two sites their transport was associated with the alongshore movement of a buoyancy front. Statistical analysis revealed a significant relationship between onshore settlement of barnacles and passage of the buoyancy front at these two sites, but at two other sites settlement was associated with diurnal upwelling. Preliminary results from a simple model are consistent with onshore transport of passive particles at depth in contrast to those near the surface. These results provide insight into processes involved in transport and settlement of marine larvae, likely important determinants of recruitment, population connectivity, and community structure.
    Note: This seminar is part of the Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Series
    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.

    Thursday, September 9, 2010 at 12 noon ET
    Title: Practical Tools, Techniques & Experiences for Conducting Meaningful Evaluation
    Speakers: Jason Chasse, Analyst, PPI; Thanh Vo, Analyst, PPI; Bill Popovich, Analyst, PA&E; Susie Holst, Analyst, NOS; Nick Salafsky, Co-Founder/ Co-Director, Foundations of Success; Cory Riley, Program Specialist, OOCRM; Dwight Trueblood, Program Manager, OOCRM; and Liz Davenport, Program Analyst, NOS
    Powerpoint slides (pdf format)
    Abstract: Panel discussion highlighting tools, techniques and practical experiences for conducting a variety of reviews and evaluations in environmental science centric projects, programs or strategies. The panel will share professional perspectives of the strengths, weaknesses and overviews of beneficial outcomes associated to evaluation efforts. Specific tools to be discussed will include Logic Models, Logical Frames and feature an open source software product demonstration of the Miradi Software for Adaptive Management.
    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.

    Tuesday, September 14, 2010 at 12 noon ET
    Title: eLearning: Anytime, Anywhere
    Speaker: Peggy Leung, Deputy Director, Office of Training and Knowledge Management (OTKM)
    Abstract: This brown bag will show employees how to enhance their career development by taking advantage of e-learning (on-line) courses. Participants will be shown the types of courses available, how to find them, and how to navigate the system. Some available courses are: Business Writing/Communications, Management and Leadership, IT/Computer, and many more. This technology is a perfect alternative to off-site training, since courses can be taken at an employee's desk. Other benefits are is the ability to work at your own pace, and the training is absolutely free. Please attend this worth while brown bag. It could afford you the opportunity you have been looking for.
    Note: The Professional Career Development Sub-Committee is hosting this brown bag at the library on behalf of the Employee Worklife and Diversity Committee, sponsored by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS).
    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.

    Wednesday, September 15, 2010 at 12 noon ET
    Title: “Make Your Dreams Take Flight” with the TIP TOP/NOAA TOASTMASTERS District 36, Division F, Club No. 632
    Speaker: Robert Gunderson, President of Toastmaster's Chapter 632
    Attend a Toastmasters meeeting and find out what Toastmasters is all about!

    About Toastmasters:The Vision of Toastmasters International empowers people to achieve their full potential and realize their dreams. Through our member clubs, people throughout the world can improve their communication and leadership skills, and find the courage to change. Toastmasters International is the leading movement devoted to making effective oral communication a worldwide reality. Through its member Clubs, Toastmasters International helps men and women learn the arts of speaking, listening and thinking – vital skills that promote self-actualization, enhance leadership, foster human understanding, and contribute to the betterment of mankind. It is basic to this mission that Toastmasters International continually expand its worldwide network of Clubs, thereby offering ever-greater numbers of people the opportunity to benefit from its programs. The mission of a Toastmasters club is to provide a mutually supportive and positive learning environment in which every member has the opportunity to develop communication and leadership skills, which in turn foster self-confidence and personal growth. Toastmasters International’s core values are integrity, dedication to excellence, service to the member, and respect for the individual. These are values worthy of a great organization, and we believe we should incorporate them as anchor points in every decision we make. Our core values provide us with a means of not only guiding but also evaluating our operations, our planning, and our vision for the future.
    For more information, please visit:
    Tip Top/NOAA Toastmasters: http://noaa.freetoasthost.com
    Capital Area District 36 Toastmasters: http://www.district36.org
    Toastmasters International: http://www.toastmasters.org

    Remote access via webinar will NOT available.

    Thursday, September 16, 2010 at 10 AM EST
    Title: My Experiences at at Channel Islands National Park Made Possible By the Our World Underwater Society Scholarship
    Speaker: Brianne Billups, National Park Service "Our World Underwater Society" scholarship intern
    Abstract: Brie will discuss her experiences this summer as an intern at the Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary. She she participated in the "Live Dive" underwater video program held at Anacapa Island. She also taught school groups and the public about the Channel Islands and the marine life found there. She is interested in education, outreach, marine biology and ecology. Brie looks forward to sharing her experiences and newfound knowledge with NOAA staff.
    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.

    Thursday, September 16, 2010 at 12 noon ET
    Title: Dressing for Success
    Powerpoint slides (pdf format)
    Speaker: Salim Abddeem, Manager for National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Office of Marine and Aviation Operations' Office of Equal Employment Opportunity and Diversity Management.
    Abstract: Have you ever wondered: what's the difference between "dressing to impress" and "dressing for success," what to wear at that job interview, or even how to dress casually at work? Insights to these and other questions about appearances in the work environment will be shared by our guest speaker, Salim Abddeen. Mr. Abddeen, Manager, Manager for National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Office of Marine and Aviation Operations' Office of Equal Employment Opportunity and Diversity Management serves as senior advisor to the directors, managers, supervisors, employees, and applicants for employment on issues regarding responsibilities under Federal civil rights laws, EEO laws, EEO regulations, and Diversity Management processes.
    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.

    Thursday, September 23, 2010 at 12 noon ET
    Title: A Visit to the Reframing Shop: Learning from the Past
    Speaker: Stephen Garber, NASA History Division
    Abstract: Policymakers and other Government workers are often looking for discrete "lessons learned." While these certainly can be defined many ways, there is no doubt that historical thinking can help inform the decisions that all of us make on a daily basis. Often just consciously analyzing the past can provide an insightful new perspective on current events. In this seminar, Steve Garber will present some highlights in NASA history, explain what he and other NASA historians do, discuss some notable areas of NOAA-NASA cooperation, and most importantly, talk about the potential usefulness of history for everybody.
    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.

    Wednesday, September 29, 2010 at 12 noon ET
    Title: Offshore Wind Energy: Its place in the US Power Mix
    Powerpoint Slides (pdf format)
    Speaker: Amardeep Dhanju, Sea Grant Knauss Fellow, Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement
    Abstract: Humans have a long history of tapping the kinetic energy stored in the wind; yet for more than 100 years the mobility and energy density of fossil fuels have made them the first choice energy source underpinning the entire structure of modern society. This dependence has come with political, economic and social costs that are highlighted in daily newscasts. Now as the society explores a transition to alternative energy resources, wind power has emerged as a preferred option. Lower price per energy unit, wide geographic availability, and very large resource size have led to development of wind resources on a larger scale than other renewable resources. As of 2010, with the exception of conventional hydroelectric power, wind power leads all other US renewable generation in installed capacity.
    All wind power development in the US to date has been on land. Many coastal states along the eastern sea board and the Great Lakes have been left out of the fast-paced wind power growth because they either lack significant land-based resources, or development is constrained due to conflicting land-uses. In such states offshore wind power offers a viable alternative that can be developed on a large-scale using existing and emerging technology.
    This presentation will examine the potential of offshore wind to meet the energy demands in the coastal regions now satisfied by coal, petroleum and natural gas. It will provide a broad overview of the technical, policy and regulatory challenges in large-scale deployment and integration of offshore wind power and discuss innovative strategies to address these issues.
    Note: This seminar is part of the Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Series
    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.

    Wednesday, September 29, 2010 at 12:30 pm ET
    Title: A socio-economic assessment of the environmental impact of livestock operations: Integrating the environment, economics, and renewable energy
    Speaker: Kornelia Dabrowska, Sea Grant Knauss Fellow, Office of Science and Technology, NMFS
    Powerpoint Slides (pdf format)
    Abstract: Communities living in close proximity to livestock operations may be subjected to economic externalities (third party or spillover effects) like pollution or odors originating from these facilities. Direct environmental contamination is of considerable concern since waste is frequently stored in stacks or pits and may leach or spill into the surrounding environment. There is also the danger that waste may be transported even further across the landscape or into water bodies via runoff. But adequate information about the social costs associated with livestock operations is scarce. Addressing this informational gap constitutes the first objective of this work. Here, economic modeling combined with GIS (Geographic Information Systems) based mapping has been used to analyze the impact of animal agriculture on the environment and local communities.
    Results reveal that decreasing these impacts by 10% to 25% (by employing anaerobic digestion for example) would result in welfare gains of over $500 to $1,100 per household, respectively, across the affected regions. Furthermore the dairy sector in Ohio has the potential to power almost 20,000 homes assuming only 25% of the waste material produced is collected and used for generation purposes. Using anaerobic digestion to generate power could decrease greenhouse gas emissions from 1% to almost 14% state wide (depending on what assumptions are made about methane content and conversion efficiency), which is about 45 to 512 thousand tons of carbon dioxide equivalent, respectively (utilizing only ¼ to ½ the available material). Lastly it should be noted that using animal waste to produce renewable energy would not entail removing crop residue from harvested lands and thus potentially decreasing the agricultural productivity of these lands.
    Note: This seminar is part of the Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Series
    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.

    Thursday, October 7, 2010 at 12 noon ET
    Title: NOS Hydrographic Survey Bottom Sample Recovery
    Speaker: Daniel Neumann, IT Specialist, National Ocean Service Hydrographic Survey Division
    Powerpoint Slides (pdf format)
    Abstract: The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Ocean Service (NOS) Hydrographic Survey Division (HSD) and National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) recently completed a joint project to provide web access to hydrographic survey metadata from the NOS Hydrographic Survey Metadata Database (HSMDB). The new online metadata display is offered on the NGDC web site under the product name Rap Sheet. One innovative feature of this view is a link to the growing database of seabed "bottom type" derived from samples collected during surveys. These samples provide seabed type annotations for nautical charts, but also have applications outside the navigation community.
    Bottom samples must have a source with adequate geographic location and description. This seminar examines the four sources of HSMDB bottom samples: Oceanographic Log "M" Sheets, Descriptive Report tabular listing, digital feature files in CARIS .hob format, and survey Detached Position plots. Preliminary results of the presenter's ongoing review suggest that adequate bottom type information exists for only seventy percent of the 8,400 surveys with verified metadata in HSMDB (H08000, c.1952, to the present).
    This seminar will discuss efforts to address the remaining thirty percent of surveys for which there is currently incomplete and/or conflicting bottom sample information in the database. Specifically the discussion will focus on: 1) Auditing the current post-H08000 HSMDB bottom sample holdings, 2) Finding "M" log sheets or survey tabular lists for uncorroborated data and resolving NGDC cruise and HSMDB display conflict, 3) Extracting bottom sample metadata from modern survey digital feature files in CARIS .hob format, and 4) completing all HSMDB Rap Sheet bottom samples with matching NGDC display and NOS count from the best available source
    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Tuesday, October 12, 2010 at 12 noon ET
    Title: Liability for Transboundary Environmental Harm and Emerging Global Environmental Law
    Speaker: Robert Percival, Robert F. Stanton Professor of Law and Director, Environmental Law Program, University of Maryland School of Law
    Powerpoint Slides (pdf format)
    Abstract: This presentation will explore why public international law has not been terribly successful in holding polluters liable for transboundary environmental harm, efforts to overcome obstacles to environmental liability, and the growth of private transnational litigation over everything from climate change to oil spills. I will argue that the rise of global environmental law that includes "bottom up" and private initiatives has become an important complement to traditional "top down" efforts to develop international liability norms. As countries strengthen their own domestic liability standards to redress environmental harm, transnational private litigation will help provide further impetus of the development of global liability norms for environmental harm that will become an important part of the new architecture of global environmental law.
    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Wednesday, October 13, 2010 at 12 noon ET
    Title: United States' effort to delimit its extended continental shelf
    Speaker: Megan Campbell, Sea Grant Knauss Fellow, Department of State Office of Ocean and Polar Affairs
    Abstract: The juridical continental shelf is an important maritime zone, one that holds many resources and vital habitats for marine life. Much of the world's continental shelf is unknown and unmapped. Even so, the responsible use and preservation of this area depends on the collection of data to better understand exactly where a coastal state's continental shelf is, and consequently, where it can exercise its rights under international law. Given these important aspects, it is critical for the United States to accurately define the full extent of its continental shelf. Determining the extent of the continental shelf is a bit different than other maritime zones, such as the territorial sea or the exclusive economic zone, because it is not simply a matter of distance from the baseline. Under customary international law, as reflected in the Convention on the Law of the Sea, every coastal State automatically has a continental shelf out to 200 nautical miles from its shore (or out to a maritime boundary with another coastal State). In some cases, a coastal State can have a continental shelf beyond 200 nautical miles if it meets certain criteria. Typically, the portion of continental shelf beyond 200 nautical miles is called the extended continental shelf or simply the ECS. This presentation will discuss the legal, policy, and technical aspects of delimiting the ECS, some interesting questions that arise in the context of delineating the outer limits of the ECS, and the process of making a submission to the Commission on the Limits of the Continental Shelf.
    Note: This seminar is part of the Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Series
    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Wednesday, October 13, 2010 at 12:30pm ET
    Title: Surface Currents and Turbulent Dispersion in the Tropical North Atlantic
    Speaker: Long Zhou, Sea Grant Knauss Fellow, Office of Policy, Planning and Evaluation, OAR
    Powerpoint Slides (pdf format)
    Abstract: A proper understanding of turbulent dispersion of ocean currents is fundamental to predicting the fate of pollutants on local scales as well as for their accurate representation of sub-grid processes in numerical studies of climate. This presentation is a story of surface currents in the tropical North Atlantic, including mapping currents, how they vary in space and time, and turbulent dispersion of in-situ and numerical drifters.
    Daily sea level anomaly (SLA) maps are computed from multiple satellite altimeter along-track measurements via objective analysis with a specified data-derived space-time correlation model. In a 2200km-wide domain in 2°N-13°N, the mesoscale flow field demonstrates meridional gradient, and an alternating pattern with a seasonal cycle. Lagrangian statistics of turbulent velocities are found to be anisotropic from two datasets: surface drifter observations in NOAA’s Global Drifter Program, and trajectories of numerical drifters dispersed by the mapped currents. Between 73% -90% of the drifter-resolved total turbulent diffusivity is contributed by the altimeter-based mesoscale flow.
    The major technical contributions of this project are: the mapping of currents with optimized resolution and parameters for a specific region, and a standardized method to estimate mean flow and turbulent velocities based on optimal numbers of independent drifter observations.
    Note: This seminar is part of the Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Series
    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Wednesday, October 20, 2010 at 12 noon ET
    Title: AQUACULTURE DEVELOPMENT IN THE 21ST CENTURY--A FEASIBILITY STUDY
    Speaker: Kyle VanderLugt, Sea Grant Knauss Fellow, Office of the Assistant Administrator, OAR
    Powerpoint Slides (pdf format)
    Abstract: Continued growth of the aquaculture industry is needed in the 21st century in response to increasing demand from inflated populations and declining wild fisheries capture. Meeting this demand will require bridging the gap between industrialized countries including the United States, and developing and least developed countries (e.g. Mexico, Uruguay, and Uganda). As the aquaculture industry becomes more globally interconnected, industrialized nations will likely be pressured to develop more sustainable practices which are natural resource conservative while developing countries will be pressured to increase production capacity and develop more intensive operations. Albeit with many inherent challenges, a globalized strategic plan is needed to bridge this gap. This presentation will briefly identify several of these inherent challenges and a present a case study of how information technology can be utilized to integrate small-scale farms in multi-national agribusiness models. This presentation will also discuss the advantages and disadvantages of new systems of aquaculture technology that are resource conservative and also have the potential to be scaled to meet industry needs. Re-circulating integrated agriculture-aquaculture (RIAA) systems combine fish and plant production whereby the nutrient rich aquaculture effluent is utilized to irrigate plants. While further research is needed to maximize the benefits of RIAA technology, results demonstrate that these systems provide both economic and environmental benefits over traditional farming methods. Ultimately, this research explores how novel technology can be implemented in strategic locations to provide a sustainable food supply capable of promoting economic growth through the distribution of seafood products to satisfy domestic and global demand.
    Note: This seminar is part of the Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Series
    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Wednesday, October 20, 2010 at 12:30 PM ET
    Title: A Spatial Analysis of Coastal Development in Cozumel, Mexico and Curaçao, the Netherlands Antilles.
    Speaker: Carl Nim, Sea Grant Knauss Fellow, NOAA Coral Reef Watch
    Powerpoint Slides (pdf format)
    Abstract: In recent decades there has been substantial infrastructural and/or economic development in coastal areas throughout the world. This is especially the case in scenic tropical locations, such as the Caribbean, where tourism is a primary driver of many economies. Political and economic forces shape this development, however, resulting in a variety of outcomes for the inhabitants of these areas and the ecosystems that surround these development projects. This presentation will discuss coastal development research that took place in Cozumel, Mexico and Curaçao, N.A. to explain some of the caveats and spatial analysis methods used to understand and evaluate the impact development has had on local communities and nearby ecosystems. Findings reinforce the importance of utilizing marine spatial planning analyses, soliciting stakeholder involvement early in the decision making process, and creating or abiding by policies designed to protect natural resources from development activities.
    Note: This seminar is part of the Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Series
    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Friday, October 22, 2010 at 12 noon ET
    Title: Exxon Valdez oil spill: looking back at oil persistence and effects after 20 years
    Speaker: Dr. Stanley "Jeep" Rice, Auke Bay Laboratories, Division of the Alaska Fisheries Science Center, NOAA Fisheries in Juneau Alaska
    Powerpoint Slides (pdf format)
    Abstract: Although the Exxon Valdez oil was 21 years ago, what lessons have we learned that might inform us on what to expect with the Deep Water Horizon spill in the gulf. First, it takes a long time for these spill events to play out. Effects to some populations are still evident from the initial exposures in 1989, oil still persists in intertidal sediments in Prince William Sound, and effects from the lingering oil are still evident with several species. Litigation relative to the spill continues. Second, there were predictable effects- thousands of birds and marine mammals died, some populations are still impacted, fisheries were closed. All spills have these predictable effects in the short term. The surprise in Alaska was the long term persistence of oil in the intertidal zone, and the long term effects that have been documented. Exxon Valdez was the most studied spill in history and has yielded the best insight into long term impacts from a spill. This talk will give examples of the long term effects (Orcas, sea otters, pink salmon, herring). The good news is that recovery continues, is a work in progress, but the productivity of the Prince William Sound is quite healthy for most species, with the recovery of herring being a major disappointment. All spills are different, yet there are principles learned with Exxon Valdez that will apply to DWH.
    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Wednesday, October 27, 2010 at 12 noon ET
    Title: The effects of predators and habitat on sea urchin density and behavior in southern California kelp forests
    Speaker: Katie Nichols, Sea Grant Knauss Fellow, Office of the Assistant Administrator for Fisheries
    Powerpoint Slides (pdf format)
    Abstract: It is well documented that sea urchins can have vast impacts on kelp forest community structure as a result of kelp grazing. Despite the ecological importance of sea urchins, direct field studies on the relative effects urchin predators have on shaping urchin populations are rare for southern California. We conducted surveys at three kelp forest sites near San Diego, CA, including heavily fished and marine reserve sites, to measure sea urchin size, abundance, and habitat use as well as the abundance of potential sea urchin predators. We also examined whether purple sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) proportional mortality varied with urchin density, time of day, and algal cover in the La Jolla Ecological Reserve, where densities of potential predators such as sheephead and spiny lobsters are high. Transect surveys showed urchin behavioral changes among the three sites with urchins tending to be more cryptic inside the reserve as compared to sites adjacent to the reserve and in heavily fished areas. Examining whether urchin mortality from predation is density-dependent and how habitat complexity influences this relationship is imperative because behavioral changes and increases in urchin populations can have vast ecological and economic consequences in kelp forest communities.
    Note: This seminar is part of the Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Series
    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Wednesday, October 27, 2010 at 12:30pm ET
    Title: Reproductive physiology and ecology of loggerhead and Kemp's ridley sea turtles: temperature-dependent sex determination and hatchling predation
    Speaker: AnneMarie Eich, Sea Grant Knauss Fellow, Branch of Aquatic Invasive Species, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
    Powerpoint Slides (pdf format)
    Abstract: Sea turtles have an interesting reproductive biology highlighted by long-distance migrations, high fecundity, prolonged age to sexual maturity, and temperature-dependent sex determination. Results will be presented from studies of sea turtle hatchling sex ratios and natural predation. The first study focuses on hatchling sex ratio production of threatened loggerhead sea turtles on Blackbeard Island National Wildlife Refuge. The second study addresses reproductive ecology of endangered Kemp's ridley sea turtles at their primary nesting beach in Rancho Nuevo, Mexico. The nests of Kemp's ridleys have historically been moved to corrals (i.e., hatcheries) due to extremely low nest numbers to protect them from predation, poaching, and erosion. However, as the number of nests increases due to conservation efforts, more nests are now being left in their original location. This study examines how these activities affect hatchling sex ratio production and predation rates.
    Note: This seminar is part of the Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Series
    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Tuesday, November 2, 2010 at 12 noon ET
    Title: Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill 2010: How Sea Grant – Land Grant Extension Met the Deepwater Horizon Challenge
    Speaker: Julie Falgout, Louisiana Sea Grant Extension Agent
    Powerpoint Slides (pdf format)
    Abstract: To respond to natural or technological disasters, Sea Grant/Land Grant programs can employ unique capabilities via university infrastructure and knowledge of local geographic, social, cultural, and government conditions. This presentation will look at the extension response to the Deepwater Horizon event and the benefit of having a Sea Grant-Land Grant agent positioned in the Incident Command System. This unique opportunity has demonstrated how multi-agency partnerships have improved extension response to this disaster and promoted the Gulf Coast’s human and environmental recovery.
    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Wednesday, November 10, 2010 at 12 noon EST
    Title: Nitrogen and salinity distributions in a river dominated estuary
    Speaker: Galen Kaufman, Sea Grant Knauss Fellow, Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center
    Powerpoint Slides (pdf format)
    Abstract: This study is focused on the dynamics of salinity and nitrogen distribution along the length of the Altamaha River estuary, Georgia. An initial nutrient budgeting exercise showed that nitrogen in the Altamaha River estuary is dominated by inputs from the river. The distribution of salinity and nutrient concentrations in the estuary under different river flows can be seen using data from a long term water quality monitoring program. The relationship between river input and salinity is explored using a relatively user-friendly hydrodynamic modeling tool, SqueezeBox. Continuing investigations involve using the USEPA Water Quality Analysis Simulation Program (WASP), an integrated hydrodynamic and water quality model, to understand the mechanisms that affect the distribution of nutrients in the estuary.
    Note: This seminar is part of the Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Series
    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Wednesday, November 10, 2010 at 12:30pm EST
    Title: American Alligator Bacterial Source Tracking In Coastal South Carolina
    Speaker: Michelle Johnston, Sea Grant Knauss Fellow, Office of National Marine Sanctuaries
    Powerpoint Slides (pdf format)
    Abstract: The presence of fecal coliform bacteria in recreational and shellfish harvesting waters is a major public health concern as elevated bacterial levels suggest the presence of pathogenic bacteria and viruses. Traditional microbial techniques do not allow specific identification of bacteria sources, thus reducing the ability to target management practices that reduce bacterial contamination. Due to the large number of American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) inhabiting coastal waterbodies in the southeastern United States, these animals may be an unrecognized source of fecal coliform bacteria in surface waters. Bacteria were isolated from the cloaca of American alligators as well as adjoining surface water samples in coastal South Carolina. The predominant enteric bacteria isolated from alligator cloacae and water samples included: Plesiomonas shigelloides, Edwardsiella tarda, Aeromonas hydrophila, Escherichia coli, Citrobacter braakii, Enterobacter cloacae, and Salmonella choleraesuis. The identified bacteria were analyzed with REP-PCR, a bacterial source tracking tool that produces distinct DNA fingerprints. By matching alligator fecal coliform bacteria fingerprints to those found in the water samples, findings increased our understanding of poikliothermic fecal coliform wildlife sources, and indicated that alligators are a fecal pollution source in coastal surface waters. These results demonstrate that REP-PCR genomic fingerprinting was able to identify not only indicator bacteria, but potential pathogenic bacteria in aquatic environments from a poikilothermic source, allowing resource managers to utilize these tools to identify and manage these specific sources to keep bacterial water quality levels below regulatory thresholds.
    Note: This seminar is part of the Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Series
    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Tuesday, November 16, 2010 at 12 noon EST
    Title: Ocean Acidification: The Other CO2 Problem
    Speaker: Dick Feely, Senior Scientist, Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory
    Powerpoint Slides available to NOAA staff
    Abstract: Carbon dioxide (CO2) is one of the most important "green-house" gases in the atmosphere affecting the radiative heat balance of the earth. As a direct result of the industrial and agricultural activities of humans over the past two centuries, atmospheric CO2 concentrations have increased by about 100 ppm. The atmospheric concentration of CO2 is now higher than experienced on Earth for at least the last 800,000 years, and is expected to continue to rise, leading to significant temperature increases in the atmosphere and oceans by the end of this century. The global oceans are the largest natural long-term reservoir for this excess heat and CO2, absorbing approximately 85% of the heat and 30% of the anthropogenic carbon released into the atmosphere since the beginning of the industrial era. Recent studies have demonstrated that both the temperature increases and the increased concentrations of CO2 in the oceans are causing significant changes in marine ecosystems. Many marine organisms are already affected by these anthropogenic stresses, including impacts due to coral bleaching and ocean acidification. Dr. Feely will discuss the present and future implications of ocean acidification on the health of our ocean ecosystems and related ocean-based economies.
    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Wednesday, December 1, 2010 at 12 noon EST
    Title: The Power of the Sea – Tsunamis, Storm Surges, Rogue Waves, and Our Quest to Predict Disasters
    Speaker: Dr. Bruce Parker, former Chief Scientist, National Ocean Service, NOAA, and presently Visiting Professor, Center for Maritime Systems, Stevens Institute of Technology
    Abstract: Dr. Parker will tell the story of our long struggle to understand the physics of the sea so we can use that knowledge to predict when the sea will unleash its power against us (so we can get out of its way and survive). The talk is based on his newly published book which interweaves compelling stories of unpredicted natural disasters with fascinating stories of scientific discoveries, beginning with ancient mankind's strange ideas about the sea and working up to our latest technological advances in predicting the sea's moments of destruction. Over the centuries, while scientists and mariners were trying to learn how to predict the motions of the sea, the sea has killed millions, destroyed untold billions of dollars in property, and had more than one impact on history. The 300,000 lives lost to the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami, the millions lost to storms surges in Bangladesh and India over the centuries, and the thousands of ships lost at sea to rogue waves, are but a few tragic examples portrayed in his book. The book also includes the history of how we learned to predict the tides, El Nino, and certain aspects of climate change.
    Note: This seminar will be held in the large conference room, room 4527, on the 4th floor of SSMC3.
    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Ocean Iron Fertilization

    Date: Tuesday, December 7, 2010

    Speaker: Alison Reed, NOAA Office of International Affairs

    Powerpoint Slides (pdf format)


    Holiday Brown Bag: A Lifetime of Growth, Service and Success through Mentoring

    Date: Tuesday, December 7, 2010 at 12 noon EST

    Speaker: Kenneth Carey, Senior Principal Systems Engineer, Noblis Center for Sustainability

    Abstract: Serving as a mentor is a challenging endeavor but one that has the opportunity to change lives, and sets the stage for a fulfilling career. A mentor gets the satisfaction in knowing they had an impact on someone’s professional and personal development, and the opportunity develop a mentee’s leadership, scientific, and communicative skills, and build confidence. They also can gain a fresh perspective from the mentee, and a link with a future generation. Mentees can gain an ally to help them find jobs, and navigate life’s “challenges”. They can benefit immensely from a mentor’s experiences, and expand their professional and personal network.

    One of the greatest tools for a mentee’s success will be the relationships that are established with more experienced and seasoned people. The mentor/protégé relationship has been used throughout history, setting the stage for advancements in science, medicine, technology and politics. Strategies and helpful hints will be presented, followed by suggestions on getting started. Concepts on moving forward and opportunities for you to informally mentor will be discussed, and motivation for being a part of a mentoring relationship are presented.

    Note: This will be our annual Holiday Brown Bag Seminar, featuring performances from the NOAA Holiday Band from 11:30am to noon and from 1:00pm to 1:30pm. Refreshments and treats will be served.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Transport of contaminants from sediments to the water column and environmental remediation strategies

    Date: Wednesday, December 8, 2010 at 12 noon EST

    Speaker: Priscilla Viana, Sea Grant Knauss Fellow, Division of Ocean Sciences at the National Science Foundation (NSF)


    Powerpoint Slides (pdf format)

    Abstract: Contaminants, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and heavy metal contaminants have accumulated on the bottom of rivers and lakes due to chemical interactions and transformations and due to their relatively long environmental persistence. Gas ebullition, in addition to normally occurring diffusive and advective transport of contaminants, increases contaminant availability to the bioactive zone and water column. Increased incidences of fish disease and decreased species biodiversity in pollution-impacted benthic/aquatic environments are some of the costs to ecological and human health posed by these contaminants.

    My study focuses on quantifying and modeling the transport of contaminants from sediments to the water column and on investigating the effectiveness of active capping as a mitigation strategy to minimize the release of these contaminants. Active capping both isolates contaminated sediments from the water phase while offering degradation and/or sequestration of contaminants by the active materials. I modeled the transport of Cd, Cr, Pb, Ag, As, Ba, Hg, CH3Hg and CN through sand (25 cm), granular activated carbon (GAC, 2 cm), organoclay (2 cm), shredded tires (10 cm) and apatite (2 cm) caps by deterministic and Monte Carlo methods. Sand caps performed best under diffusion due to the greater diffusive path length. Apatite had the best advective performance for Cd, Cr and Pb. Organoclay performed best for Ag, As, Ba, CH3Hg and CN. Organoclay and apatite were equally effective for Hg. Monte Carlo analysis was used to determine output sensitivity. Sand was effective under diffusion for Cr within the 50% confidence interval (CI), for Cd and Pb (75% CI) and for As, Hg and CH3Hg (95% CI). Under diffusion and advection, apatite was effective for Cd, Pb and Hg (75% CI) and organoclay for Hg and CH3Hg (50% CI). GAC and shredded tires performed relatively poorly. Although no single cap is a panacea, apatite and organoclay have the broadest range of effectiveness.

    I am also quantifying and modeling metal contaminant and PAH transport from the sediment to the water column due to gas ebullition as recent research suggests that another important factor affecting cap performance is gas ebullition due to organic matter biodegradation primarily under methanogenic conditions. Gas bubbles may damage the cap layer, opening preferential holes in the cap or even rupture the cap. Additionally, my results demonstrate that gas ebullition may be an important pathway for release of PAH and heavy metal pollutants to the water column. Comparison of diffusive and advective release rates (measured through a benthic chamber study) to field ebullition facilitated rates suggest that PAHs are released at >10 times greater rates by biogenic gas production. Although the increase in release rate is not as great for metals, ebullition facilitated release rates are frequently much greater.

    Using our field study and modeling results, we worked with the Wetlands Initiative and the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago (MWRD-GC) to improve the stewardship of the highly contaminated local aquatic resources. We proposed placement of an organoclay mat with an underlying sloped sand layer and a high permeability gas venting system to allow biogenically-produced gas migration to shoreline collectors through an innovative support grid. The project design included an overlaying wetland to remove nutrients from the adjoining Chicago River and to provide a public recreational space.

    Note: This seminar is part of the Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Series

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Ingredients for Protection: How Guangzhou, China Can Learn from Boston and New York City’s Experiences with Surface Drinking Water Source Protection

    Date: Wednesday, December 8, 2010 at 12:30pm EST

    Speaker: Shannon Cosentino-Roush, Sea Grant Knauss Fellow, NOAA Office of Law Enforcement


    Powerpoint Slides (pdf format)

    Abstract: Today more than 1 billion people around the globe and nearly a quarter of China’s total population lacks access to clean drinking water. This raises the question: what can be done to ensure clean and safe drinking water not only on a global scale, but more specifically in the context of this research, in Guangzhou, China?

    Historically, many communities used preventative measures to maintain the quality of their local drinking water. They took water from non-polluted upstream areas, passed regulations limiting polluting activities, and preserved land around the drinking water source. Yet, over time as technology improved, many communities began to rely more heavily on treatment and other methods rather than on drinking water source protection. Today, though treatment remains a vital tool, it is important to recognize that the value of source water protection in the struggle to ensure clean drinking water cannot be overlooked.

    As China struggles to deal with its large population, an increasingly polluted environment, and water shortages, it must figure out an effective and efficient way to ensure clean drinking water. Specifically, the interest in source water protection became increasingly apparent when a professor from Sun Yat-Sen University in Guangzhou, China approached Vermont Law School’s China Program with the question: How does the United States protect its surface drinking water sources? Thus, the mission began: to research examples of United States’ cities engaging in drinking water source protection and to assess how their experiences might be applied in Guangzhou, China.

    This presentation discusses the two primary pieces of federal legislation underlying surface drinking water source protection in the United States: the Clean Water Act and the Safe Drinking Water Act. It then explores how two United States’ cities, Boston and New York, incorporate and expand on the federal approach, in order to extrapolate effective themes and strategies useful for implementing and improving upon source water protection. Subsequently, this presentation discusses the current water pollution situation in the Pearl River Delta region in China, particularly the urban center of Guangzhou, and analyzes the relevant national and local laws governing over drinking water source protection. Finally, this presentation concludes by applying the extrapolated themes to Guangzhou in order to provide suggestions for improving the city’s source water protection efforts in the future.

    Note: This seminar is part of the Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Series

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Unwanted Medicines and Educating our Communities: What Have we Learned, How are we Doing and What are the Next Steps? Experiences from the Great Lakes States

    Date: Wednesday, December 15, 2010 at 12 noon EST

    Speaker: Susan Boehme, Illinois-Indiana Sea Grant College Program Outreach Coordinator and Liaison to the U.S. EPA Great Lakes National Program Office

    Powerpoint Slides (pdf format)

    Abstract: Medicines are produced in increasing volumes every year. With this growth comes concern regarding environmental fate of unwanted medicines. Recent studies identified pharmaceutical compounds in fresh and marine waters nationwide, and several of these bioactive compounds are potentially harmful to aquatic organisms, even in small quantities. Additionally, improper medicine disposal poses poisoning risks to children, the elderly and pets and can lead to drug/identity theft. Unused medicines may accumulate in homes or be flushed, placed in the trash, or given to others, all of which have significant disadvantages. One approach for decreasing amounts of unwanted medicines reaching the environment is the organization of collection programs that ensure safer methods of disposal. This presentation will describe the status of our efforts in the Great Lakes Region including collection programs, outreach and education with an eye toward what is still needed, and what should be our next steps to expand the program nationally. Should we focus more on the front end of the cycle including drug manufacturing, and reducing the amounts of waste from the home, or should we focus on non-residential waste of pharmaceuticals including confined animal feeding operations (CAFOs), hospitals and clinics? Where do we go from here?

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Turning Japanese: A Year in Japan as a Mansfield Fellow

    Date: Thursday, December 16, 2010 at 12 noon EST

    Speaker: Michael Clark, Office of Sustainable Fisheries, NMFS

    Abstract: I participated in the Mansfield Fellowship between September 2008 and September 2010. This two-year fellowship provides Federal government employees with the opportunity to learn Japanese and then spend a year working in Japan on issues relevant to their expertise and interests. The first year was spent learning Japanese in DC and the second year was spent in Japan working at a variety of offices, including: the Fisheries Agency, with a member of the Japanese Legislature (Diet), at a seafood trading company, with a fisheries economist at Tokyo University, and at their Fisheries Research Agency.

    In terms of value and volume, Japan is one of the world's most significant consumers of seafood; over 60 percent of which is imported from countries like the United States. The cultural significance and economic importance of seafood have led to efforts by the Japanese Fisheries Agency to try and increase Japan's self-sufficiency rate for seafood products, however; overfished stocks, aging fishermen and migration from coastal communities, and the decreasing price of imports have made it difficult to achieve this goal.

    Significant differences exist between Japan and the United States concerning their approach to fisheries management. These differences stem from a unique history in Japan where fishermen have traditionally maintained more autonomy concerning management decisions, resulting in a more "bottom-up", co-management regime between fisheries cooperatives and government. Furthermore, commercial fishermen are the predominant stakeholder in Japan meaning environmental NGOs, recreational fishermen, and the general public are not as involved in the management process as they are in the United States.

    Japan is a country unlike any other I have visited: a wealthy country where you can still experience culture shock. Japan is modern, but not at all western. A country that has been responsible for numerous technological advancements in a variety of industries while adhering to rigid cultural norms that are will not likely change anytime soon. Please consider joining me on December 16th to learn about this experience.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    2011 Brown Bags

    Biological and Behavioral Response Studies (BRS) in southern California (SOCAL-10)

    Date: Wednesday, January 5, 2011 at 12 noon EST

    Speaker: Brandon Southall, President and Senior Scientist for Southall Environmental Associates, Inc. and Research Associate with the University of California, Santa Cruz (UCSC)

    Powerpoint Slides (pdf format)

    Abstract: SOCAL-10 was a scientific research project conducted in Aug-Sept 2010 in important biological areas near southern California. It extended previous studies in the Bahamas (2007-08) and Mediterranean Sea (2009) of whether and how marine mammals change their behavior when they hear different sounds. Each of these studies have integrated behavioral response studies to controlled sound exposures with ongoing research on diving, foraging, and social behavior. The overall objective was to provide a better basic understanding of marine mammal behavior, while providing direct scientific information for the Navy and regulatory agencies to estimate risk and minimize the impact of human sounds, particularly military sonar. SOCAL-10 was the first in a five-year dedicated effort to study a variety of marine mammal species in areas around the southern California coast and Channel Islands.

    SOCAL-10 involved an interdisciplinary collaboration of experts in marine mammal biology, behavior, and communication, as well as underwater acousticians and specialized field researchers. During a preliminary scouting phase and two research legs on different research vessels, SOCAL-10 observed, photographed, and/or tracked in detail, individuals of 21 different marine mammal species. Sixty-two tags (of six different varieties) were successfully secured on 44 individual animals of nine different marine mammal species, including several which had never been studied using tag technologies previously. Scientists also conducted 28 controlled sound exposure experiments; in these experiments, animals were monitored with suction cup acoustic sensors, remote listening devices and specialized observers with high-powered binoculars. Sounds were then played to the animals under specific protocols and protective measures (to ensure animals were not harmed) and changes in behavior were measured.

    Preliminary results based primarily on clearly observable behavior in the field and from initial data assessment indicate variable responses, depending on species, type of sound, and behavioral state during the experiments. Some observations in certain conditions suggest avoidance responses, while in other cases subjects seemed to not respond, at least overtly. Additional analysis and interpretation is underway of the nearly 400 hours of tag data from the project, as well as thousands of marine mammal observations, photographs, tissue samples, and acoustic measurements.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    UNEP, the Arctic, and the Law of the Sea

    Date: Monday, January 10, 2011 at 12 noon EST

    Speakers: Amy Fraenkel, Regional Director and Representative for the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), and Dr. Yannick Beaudoin, Head of the Marine Programme at the Global Resource Information Database Center in Arendal, Norway (UNEP/GRID-Arendal)

    Presentation (QuickTime format, 610 MB)

    Abstract: Ms. Fraenkel will address UNEP’s work on current and possible future Arctic environmental issues. In 2008, UNEP’s Governing Council encouraged UNEP “to cooperate, as requested, with the Arctic Council, relevant Multilateral Environmental Agreements and other relevant regional and international bodies, as appropriate,” in addressing Arctic environmental issues. In implementing the 2010-11 Programme of Work, UNEP is collaborating with GRID-Arendal, UNEP’s Polar Collaborating Centre, to carry out a number of activities related to polar issues, some of which are conducted in close cooperation with the Arctic Council’s working groups. Pursuant to its existing mandate, UNEP wishes to ascertain where it might best serve governments and other stakeholders to identify and address environmental issues in the Arctic region and the linkages between Arctic and global issues. To this end UNEP plans to consult with Arctic country governments, key multilateral entities such as the Arctic Council and the International Maritime Organization, indigenous peoples and civil society. This discussion presents one such opportunity for providing input to UNEP. A Concept Note is attached as background.

    Dr. Beaudoin will discuss UNEP Shelf Programme's work on continental shelf mapping and how UNEP/GRID-Arendal, as implementing institution, advises countries in preparing their submissions to the Commission on the Limits of the Continental Shelf. His presentation will mainly focus on the recent intensive efforts in West Africa and with 11 Pacific Island Countries. Over the past 5 years, the UNEP Shelf Programme has been mandated with assisting countries in their delineation effort. In addition, as part of a continuing effort to assist developing coastal states in the sustainable use of their marine environment and resources, UNEP/GRID-Arendal is currently in the development phase of new major initiatives, two of which, a Blue Carbon initiative and an ocean management programme, will be briefly presented. UNEP/GRID-Arendal is particularly interested in expertise from and collaboration with NOAA.

    Note: This seminar is sponsored by the Office of General Counsel for International Law.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Training the next generation of scientists and engineers

    Date: Tuesday, January 11, 2011 at 12 noon EST

    Speaker: Sarah Hammond, Marine Educator, MIT Sea Grant

    Powerpoint Slides (pdf format)

    Abstract: The Sea Perch program is an innovative underwater robotics initiative that trains teachers—who then train their students—to build a remotely operated vehicle (ROV). The program, started by MIT Sea Grant (MITSG) in 2003, is designed to encourage students' enthusiasm for science, technology, and engineering. MITSG educators have been able to train nearly 500 teachers around the world.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    AAAS Science and Technology Policy Fellowships: Plug the Power of Science into Public Policy

    Date: Tuesday, January 18, 2011 at 12 noon EST

    Speakers: Laura Petes, Gabrielle Dreyfus, Erin Seney, Melissa Kenney, Brandon Sitzman, Jen Boehme, and Ariana Sutton-Grier, NOAA AAAS fellows

    Powerpoint Slides (pdf format)

    Abstract: American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Science & Technology Policy Fellows are competitively-selected, post-doctoral scientists and engineers (PhD, MD, DVM) from a broad range of disciplines. These Fellows are available for placement in federal agencies for a 1-2 year term (renewal year can include details outside of the DC area). The Program, in existence since 1973, has an outstanding national reputation with many former Fellows occupying some of the highest positions in science policy throughout the federal government. AAAS currently partners with over 15 federal agencies, many Congressional offices and committees, and nearly 30 professional scientific societies to operate the Science & Technology Policy Fellowships.

    NOAA has hosted 10 AAAS Fellows since it began participating in the Fellowship Program in 2007. The Fellows offer scientific and technical expertise as they assist with projects, program management, or policy analysis. Fellows start work after two weeks of intense training in science policy (including ethics, the legislative process, and the budget process) and are supported throughout their two years with professional development activities. AAAS Fellows also serve as a link to a network of science and science policy professionals across academia and government, including a network of over 2,300 current and former Fellows.

    The recruitment process for 2011-2012 AAAS Fellows is already underway, and prospective host offices must act soon to participate. At this Brown Bag information session, current AAAS Fellows and AAAS program staff will share details about the program, insights about their experiences, upcoming deadlines in the recruitment process, and answer your questions. Because the renewal year of the Fellowship can include details outside of the DC area, regional offices and labs are encouraged to participate via webinar.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    NOAALink 101 Training

    Date: Tuesday, January 25, 2011 from 11:00am to 12:30pm EST

    Speaker: Dexter Fredericks, IT Project Manager, Enterprise Projects Division, OCIO

    Abstract: NOAALink 101 Training introduces contracting personnel and other interested attendees to the NOAALink PMO, as well as the processes and benefits that NOAALink offers to the Department of Commerce (DOC), and particularly NOAA, in IT contracting. This training is for contracting personnel and others who manage and support IT contracts. The training will provide a detailed walk through of what contracting and IT personnel need to know to engage and work with NOAALink.

    NOAALink offers DOC, NOAA and all of the NOAA Line Offices better opportunities for IT products and services, including cost savings, time savings and better, more comprehensive IT products and services, all through a streamlined acquisition process supported by the NOAALink PMO.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Assisting Great Lakes Coastal Communities with Climate Change Adaptation

    Date: Friday, February 4, 2011 at 12 noon EST

    Speaker: Shauna Casey, Danielle Forsyth, Rebecca Held, Sara Katich and Cybelle Shattuck, Masters Students at the University of Michigan's School of Natural Resources and Environment

    Powerpoint Slides (pdf format)

    Abstract: The Great Lakes region is predicted to experience significant coastal impacts due to global climate change that are different than impacts being predicted for our ocean coasts. Specialized education, training and community planning will need to be developed to assist Great Lakes coastal communities in adapting to changes resulting from climate change. This project resulted in three educational modules that can be delivered individually or as a unit to prepare local officials to develop climate change adaptation plans for their communities. These outreach modules will be delivered by Sea Grant Program Extension Staff, USDA Extension Staff, Coastal Zone Management Programs, and other trained outreach professionals who work with local community decision makers in the Great Lakes region. Modules were designed to allow for maximum flexibility and adaptability and can easily be modified to include future research and tools that increase the body of information useful for local decision makers.

    The student team from SNRE completed this project with the help of NOAA Great Lakes Regional Collaboration team members and Sea Grant professionals as part of a mini-grant funded by the National NOAA Sea Grant College Program. The SNRE team will present an overview of the project and the educational tools they developed, including examples of materials from the modules. Please join us for a discussion about educational outreach related to climate change adaptation.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    NOAALink 101 Training

    Date:Tuesday, February 8, 2011 from 11:00am to 12:30pm EST

    Speaker: Dexter Fredericks, IT Project Manager, Enterprise Projects Division, OCIO

    Powerpoint Slides (pdf format)

    Abstract: NOAALink 101 Training introduces contracting personnel and other interested attendees to the NOAALink PMO, as well as the processes and benefits that NOAALink offers to the Department of Commerce (DOC), and particularly NOAA, in IT contracting. This training is for contracting personnel and others who manage and support IT contracts. The training will provide a detailed walk through of what contracting and IT personnel need to know to engage and work with NOAALink.

    NOAALink offers DOC, NOAA and all of the NOAA Line Offices better opportunities for IT products and services, including cost savings, time savings and better, more comprehensive IT products and services, all through a streamlined acquisition process supported by the NOAALink PMO.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Coral Reef Management Fellowship: Conservation Projects in the Caribbean and the Pacific

    Date: Tuesday, February 22, 2011 at 12 noon EST

    Speakers: NOAA Coral Reef Management Fellows

    Abstract: The NOAA Coral Reef Management Fellows from the Pacific and the Caribbean regions will present on their various projects projects in a series of short sessions during this one-hour seminar. These projects include: Facilitating community participation in marine reserves (PR); Developing guidelines for marine operators (USVI); Coordination of maritime and construction industry permitting (FL); Large-scale watershed revegetation in coral areas (CNMI); and Climate Change island action strategies (AS).

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    The Sargasso Sea Project

    Date: Monday, February 28, 2011 at 12 noon EST

    Speaker: Dr. David Freestone, Executive Director, the Sargasso Sea Alliance

    Powerpoint Slides (pdf format)

    Abstract: Sylvia Earle has called the Sargasso Sea "the golden rainforest of the ocean." It is a unique pelagic ecosystem based on species of Sargassum that are able to develop without contact with land. It is a crucial habitat for a number of species including fish, turtles and eel on the IUCN red list of endangered species. There is also an emerging recognition of the crucial role it plays in the wider ecosystem ranging from the Atlantic to the Caribbean and the Gulf of Mexico. The threats to the Sargasso include garbage and plastics cast overboard from boats, oil discharges, overfishing, the extraction of Sargasso for bio fuels, and climate change.

    Dr. Freestone will discuss the Alliance and their approach to sectoral organisations with relevant competences to encourage them to adopt new protection measures in accordance with the 1982 Law of the Sea Convention. These might include the International Maritime Organisation (IMO), in relation to ship discharges and the designation of a Particularly Sensitive Sea Area, as well as fisheries bodies such the Northwest Atlantic Fisheries Organisation (NAFO) and the International Convention for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas (ICCAT) (which already has agreed to monitoring and reporting requirements for Sargassum impacts).

    Dr. Freestone is a world-renowned legal expert on international environmental law with extensive experience, including as a senior legal adviser at the World Bank and as a professor at the Law School of George Washington University, the University of Hull in the UK and the UN University Institute of Advanced Studies. Dr. Freestone has written widely on international environmental law and Law of the Sea and is the founding editor of the _International Journal of Marine and Coastal Law_. More information about Dr. Freestone and the Sargasso Sea Alliance is available at http://www.greenrock.org/news/bermuda/399-director-appointed-sargasso-sea-alliance.

    Note: This seminar is sponsored by the Office of General Counsel for International Law.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    NOAALink 101 Training

    Date: Tuesday, March 8, 2011 from 11:00am to 12:30pm EST

    Speaker: Dexter Fredericks, IT Project Manager, Enterprise Projects Division, OCIO

    Abstract: NOAALink 101 Training introduces contracting personnel and other interested attendees to the NOAALink PMO, as well as the processes and benefits that NOAALink offers to the Department of Commerce (DOC), and particularly NOAA, in IT contracting. This training is for contracting personnel and others who manage and support IT contracts. The training will provide a detailed walk through of what contracting and IT personnel need to know to engage and work with NOAALink.

    NOAALink offers DOC, NOAA and all of the NOAA Line Offices better opportunities for IT products and services, including cost savings, time savings and better, more comprehensive IT products and services, all through a streamlined acquisition process supported by the NOAALink PMO.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    An investigation of the socio-economic aspects associated with the restoration of Muskegon Lake, MI

    Date: Thursday, March 10, 2011 at 12 noon EST

    Speaker: Dr Paul Isely, Assistant Professor, Economics, DeVos Center, Grand Valley State University

    Powerpoint Slides (pdf format)

    Abstract: Muskegon Lake, located in Muskegon, MI, was designated as a Great Lakes Area of Concern by the US EPA in 1987. The Great Lakes Commission through NOAA received a $10 million grant for habitat restoration along the southern shoreline of the lake, which includes the removal of hardened shoreline and contaminated sediments. We compare the estimated benefits of a stimulus funded remediation over time in Muskegon Lake, MI with the direct costs of the remediation. Using travel cost surveys, contingent valuation surveys, and hedonic valuation of residential property, we estimate the economic values of the ecosystem services associated with the restoration of wetland habitat in this Great Lakes Area of Concern. The travel cost survey uses a statistically random sample of over 200 recreational users of Muskegon Lake at multiple recreational access points before and during the remediation. The contingent valuation survey samples a similarly sized random sample of Muskegon County residents via an in person stated preference questionnaire as in Whitehead et al (2009). The hedonic analysis uses proximity to the first and second closest shoreline segments, and their associated lengths, to both natural and hardened shoreline from each house before and after the restoration. The estimates from all three methods are then used to find the economic impact on the Muskegon region. Results find that the return on investment is greater than the cost of remediation.

    Note: This seminar is sponsored by the NOAA Restoration Center, Office of Habitat Conservation (NMFS).

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Closing the Gap: How Scientists Can Connect with the Public

    Powerpoint Slides

    Date: Tuesday March 22, 2011 at 12 noon EDT

    Speaker: Aaron Huertas, Press Secretary for the Union of Concerned Scientists

    Abstract: Americans’ appreciation for science is "a mile wide and an inch deep" as one researcher put it. The decline in science journalism and the proliferation of niche media outlets is making it more difficult for scientists to have their voices heard. Meanwhile, the nature of science reporting often conflicts with science education goals. Using best-practices from communications and public relations, scientists and science-based institutions can gain a greater understanding of how the public views their work. When scientists hone their communications skills, they can broaden and deepen public understanding of science. In particular, the concept of "message discipline" can be applied in a scientifically-rigorous way that enhances public understanding of science. Additionally, narrative forms of communication hold great promise for helping people understand why they should care about the work scientists are doing.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Preparing for the Rising Tide: Helping Coastal Communities Cope with the Impacts of Climate Change

    Date: Monday, April 4, 2011 at 12 noon EDT

    Speaker: Juliette Finzi Hart, Regional Research and Planning Specialist, USC Sea Grant

    Powerpoint slides (pdf format)
    View the WebEx Recording (wrf format, requires you to download the free WRF player).

    Abstract: The University of Southern California (USC) Sea Grant program, located in the heart of downtown Los Angeles, tackles issues relating to the "Urban Ocean." Climate change and its impacts on a highly urbanized coast and the surrounding aquatic and marine coastal ecosystems is now one of our major areas of focus. USC Sea Grant has a number of ongoing local, statewide and national research, outreach and education projects. We are coordinating an effort with multiple Sea Grant programs to administer a climate change adaptation barriers and needs assessment survey to all coastal states. We are working with local scientists to develop a clearinghouse of oceanographic data from the Southern California Bight that relates to climate change; and, then working to develop workshops and products to link these data to policy-makers and community members. And, we have partnered with the Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary to train sanctuary docents on climate change to continue educating the interested public about the constantly developing science of climate change. These projects will be presented along with a discussion of next steps and opportunities for collaboration within the NOAA family.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Building a data center from scratch - the Integrated Ocean Data and Information Management System (ZSPDO) at the Institute of Oceanology, Polish Academy of Sciences (IOPAN) and The state of atmospheric research at IOPAN

    Date: Wednesday, April 13, 2011 at 12 noon EDT

    Speakers: Marcin Wichorowski and Tymon Zielinski, Institute of Oceanology, Warsaw, Poland

    Abstract: The Institute of Oceanology, PAS (IOPAN) maintains huge archives of information gathered during research activities performed for more than 50 years. To enable cooperation in data exchange on a higher level IOPAN has decided to develop a data center and deploy a system for management of data and information, using well defined and widely used standards of data processing defined within the SeaDataNet project.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    The Effect of Salinity on Experimental Infections of Hematodinium sp. in Blue Crabs, Callinectes sapidus

    Date: Thursday, April 21, 2011 at 12 noon EDT

    Speaker: Anna Huntley Coffey, Policy Specialist, Water Power Program, Department of Energy

    Abstract: The parasitic dinoflagellate Hematodinium sp. parasitizes blue crabs along the Atlantic seaboard of the USA. Infections in blue crabs have only been reported from waters >11psu salinity. Blue crabs maintain a hyperosmotic internal concentration at low salinities (0-5psu) and, thus, should be capable of maintaining an infection in low salinity waters, even if Hematodinium cells are intolerant of low salinities. We tested this by observing the effect of low salinity on the progression of disease in crabs experimentally infected with the parasite. Blue crabs were acclimated to 5-psu or 30-psu salinity treatments. They were inoculated with Hematodinium sp. and necropsied 3, 7, 10, and 15 days post-inoculation. The low salinity treatment did not have an effect on the proliferation of Hematodinium infections in blue crabs; moreover, a greater proportion of infections in crabs in the low salinity treatment developed into the dinospore stage than in the high salinity treatment, indicating that salinity may affect the development of the parasite. Dinospores in in vitro cultures rapidly became inactive when held in salinities <15psu. Our experiments indicate that Hematodinium can develop in blue crabs at low salinities, but that the parasite is incapable of transmission in this environment, which may explain the lack of natural infections in crabs at low salinities.

    Note: This seminar is part of the 2011 Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Series

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Microbial Response to Potential Soil-Stabilizing Amendments for Coastal Wetland Restoration

    Date: Thursday, April 21, 2011 at 12 noon EDT

    Speaker: Lauren Land, Focus Team Coordinator, Sustainable Coastal Development and Hazard Resilience in Coastal Communities, National Sea Grant Office, NOAA

    Abstract: During metabolism of organic matter, microbes release extracellular polymeric substances, which accumulate to bind particles and increase soil aggregation. A similar concept might be implemented on a larger scale to aid wetland restoration. Hypothetically, amending hydraulically dredged sediment with polymer prior to deposition on subsiding marshes can lead to sediment stabilization until plants become established. However, adding a simple carbon source to the sediment can potentially affect microbial activity. This study determined the effect of addition of two commercially available natural polymers (xanthan gum and guar gum) on microbial biomass and activity in three types of hydraulically dredged sediments (clay, silty clay, sandy loam) saturated under a range of salinity regimes (1 and 5 ppt, 5 and 10 ppt, and 15 and 25 ppt, respectively) for four time periods (1, 8, 16, and 26 weeks). The CO2 evolved in response to added polymer suggests that microbial communities rapidly degraded the polymers. Addition of polymers provided a readily available source of carbon that induced a priming effect on the microbial biomass leading to increased activity. Microbial activity accelerated beyond background (control) respiration leading to a loss of as much as 8.7 times the native soil carbon. Therefore, polymer additions to wetland sediments can lead to a significant increase in native soil carbon loss with a concomitant decrease in soil quality.

    Note: This seminar is part of the 2011 Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Series

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Australian Approaches to Coastal Climate Change Adaptation

    Date: Wednesday, May 11, 2011 at 12 noon EDT

    Speaker: Bruce Thom, Chair of the Australian National Coasts and Climate Change Council

    Powerpoint slides (pdf format)

    Abstract: Australian governments (federal, state and local) are taking very seriously the highly likely threats from global warming on coastal settlements and habitats such as the Great Barrier Reef. Approximately 85% of the Australian population lives in coastal regions, and considerable economic and recreational values are dependent on sustained coastal conditions into the future. A national effort is underway in Australia to assess risks to coastal assets, both built and natural. Cooperation between federal and state governments is a challenge given their respective constitutional powers. Local governments are demanding technical and financial support, as well as greater powers to constrain developments in vulnerable locations. At this stage, the emphasis is on both assessing risks due to slowly rising sea levels and increased storm wave attack, as well as on developing a practical set of adaptation planning options acceptable to communities and property owners.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Comparative Phylogeography of the Coral Triangle and Implications for Marine Management

    Date: Thursday, May 12, 2011 at 12 noon EDT

    Speaker: Dr. Kent Carpenter, Professor of Biological Sciences at Old Dominion University and the Manager of the IUCN Global Marine Species Assessment (GMSA) project

    Abstract: Extreme concentration of marine biodiversity and exploitation of marine resources in the Coral Triangle pose challenges to biogeographers and resource managers. Comparative phylogeography provides a powerful tool to test biogeographic hypotheses evoked to explain species richness in the Coral Triangle. It can also be used to delineate management units for marine resources. After about a decade of phylogeographical studies, patterns for the Coral Triangle are emerging. Broad connectivity in some species support the notion that larvae have maintained gene flow among distant populations for long periods. Other phylogeographic patterns suggest vicariant events resulting from Pleistocene sea level fluctuations, which have, at least occasionally, resulted in speciation. Divergence dates ranging back to the Miocene suggest that changing land configurations may have precipitated an explosion of species diversification. A synthesis of the marine phylogeographic studies reveals repeated patterns that corroborate hypothesized biogeographic processes and suggest improved management schemes for marine resources.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    The Influence of Surface Atmospheric Stability on Air-Water Interface Modeling over Lake Michigan

    Date: Thursday, May 19, 2011 at 12 noon EDT

    Speaker: Joe Fillingham, Labs and Cooperative Institutes, NOAA Office of Oceanic and Atmostpheric Research

    Powerpoint slides (pdf format)

    Abstract: The Laurentian Great Lakes make up one of the largest areas of surface freshwater in the world. They have a profound influence on the weather of the United States, and as a vital natural resource supporting an intricate ecosystem, present complex and interdisciplinary challenges to both scientists and managers. The surface of the Great Lakes spans 94,000 square miles. As the interface between the overlying atmosphere and the 6 quadrillion gallons of fresh water the lakes contain, this massive area represents its own set of unique questions. The project presented here attempts to illustrate the influence of surface atmospheric stability on the exchange of mass and energy across the air-water interface. Through a wind-wave modeling experiment and a comparison of different CO2 gas flux models over Lake Michigan, it is shown that the stability of the atmosphere near the water surface caused by the difference between the air and water temperatures plays an important role in these physical processes. It is found that if not accounted for in modeling research, the influence of stability may lead to large errors in wave height forecasting and determining net carbon flux between the lakes and the atmosphere. Other unique issues of this physical environment are explored as they apply to this type of modeling such as fetch limitation and feedback on the ecological system.

    Note: This seminar is part of the 2011 Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Series

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Habitat Connectivity Controls Species Richness, Similarity and Rates of Community Development: Results from an Experimental Marine Metacommunity

    Date: Thursday, May 19, 2011 at 12:30pm EDT

    Speaker: James Reinhardt, Damage Assessment Remediation and Restoration Program, NOAA Office of Habitat Conservation

    Powerpoint slides (pdf format)

    Abstract: Connectivity is an important property to understand in the context of our stressed and ever changing marine environment. Experiments and theory elucidating the importance of habitat connectivity can help us make informed decisions in regards to practical applications such as coastal development and MPA creation. Using the shallow hard-substrate benthic community of Southern New England as a model system, I examined species dynamics using the 'metacommunity' framework. A metacommunity is a system of independent local communities that interact (i.e., are connected) through dispersal. Specifically, I sought to increase our understanding of interacting regional (dispersal) and local dynamics (competition) and how processes at these two scales influence species richness. I did this by augmenting the connectivity of interacting experimental local communities via distance between communities. Connectivity between habitats significantly influences the timing of community development, alpha species richness and community similarity. Some of these results have been supported by others findings, while other results are non-intuitive.

    Note: This seminar is part of the 2011 Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Series

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    The Constitution and the Law of the Sea

    Date: Tuesday, May 24, 2011 at 12 noon EDT

    Speaker: Michael P. Socarras, Esq. of the law firm of McDermott, Will & Emery LLP

    Powerpoint slides (pdf format)

    Abstract: Mr. Socarras will discuss how confusion about the nature and status of customary international law is affecting U.S. federal courts and their approach to the law of the sea. The Restatement (Third) of the Foreign Relations Law of the United States and some recent lower federal court decisions on the law of the sea are materially wrong when measured by the standard of how the Supreme Court applies customary international law. For two centuries the Supreme Court has found customary international law in the practices and not in the promises of States, and has enforced customary international law as the highest form of domestic U.S. law that is neither derived from nor limited by the U.S. Constitution. Among the implications of this are that: 1) the customary international law of the sea in practice today is more clearly binding as U.S. domestic law than a ratified Law of the Sea Convention could ever be as a treaty, and 2) what States do not customarily do in practice is not likely to be enforced by the federal courts even if the U.S. were to become a party to the Law of the Sea Convention.

    Note: This seminar is sponsored by the Office of General Counsel for International Law.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Projecting the response of an endangered marine vertebrate to climate change: Reconciling terrestrial versus oceanic impacts

    Date: Wednesday, May 25, 2011 at 12 noon EDT

    Speaker: Vincent S. Saba, Ph.D., Associate Research Scholar, Princeton University, and post-doctorate researcher, NOAA GFDL

    Abstract: The impacts of anthropogenic induced climate change on ecosystems and biodiversity is one of the key topics for the upcoming fifth assessment report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). Critically endangered leatherback turtles in the eastern Pacific Ocean are excellent candidates for this assessment because they have been extensively studied in terms of their sensitivity to present-day climate variability at both their terrestrial and oceanic environment. If incidental fisheries mortality of leatherback turtles is reduced or eliminated, the population still faces the challenge of recovery in a rapidly changing climate. However, the synergistic impacts of climate change at their terrestrial and oceanic habitats have yet to be reconciled. Here I combine the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory's Earth System Model (GFDL-ESM 2.1), IPCC climate model projections, and a leatherback population dynamics model to estimate a 7% per decade decline in the population over the next century. Whereas changes in ocean conditions had no effect on the population, the warming of the nesting beach was the primary driver of the decline via decreased neonate recruitment. Therefore, even with the elimination of incidental fisheries mortality, the population still faces extirpation. This study highlights the potential for human intervention at nesting beaches to prevent the population collapse; climate mitigation of leatherback nests may be able to negate the precipitous population decline.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    What’s It All About, OMB? Performance! Discover the NEW Government Performance and Results Act Modernization Act of 2010

    Date: Thursday, May 26, 2011 at 12 noon EDT

    Speakers: Liz Davenport, NOS Office of Management and Budget and Thanh Vo, NOAA Office of Program Planning and Integration

    Abstract: Particularly in lean budget times, it is critical for the Federal government to effectively plan and perform. To that end, strategic planning and performance management must be dynamic and successful. A potential aid is the Government Performance and Results Act (GPRA) Modernization Act, enacted January 4, 2011. GPRA MA reforms the original 1993 GPRA with 150 changes. The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) has recently begun the first actions of a 3-year implementation.

    How will GPRA MA impact you, your program, your line or staff office, NOAA, DOC, and other Federal agencies? Much of the 1993 GPRA is extended, but with substantial new requirements that will impact how agencies plan, budget, monitor, evaluate, and report performance. This law portends a new partnership between OMB, the Executive Branch, and Congress for results-based budgeting and execution of mandates and authorities to benefit the Nation. Please join us to explore answers to these questions:

    • How does GPRA MA affect the "LINE OF SIGHT" from your personal performance plan to the highest Federal performance goals? What new opportunities to tell NOAA’s performance "stories" are potential under GPRA MA?
    • How does GPRA MA drive improved performance? Why will alignment of strategic priority projects, programs, goal and enterprise objectives, and overarching Federal performance goals be more important than ever?
    • In lean budget times, how will GPRA MA empower agencies to "manage, meet, and message" performance expectations/needs?
    • How will www.performance.gov educate Congress and the public about how NOAA is achieving expected performance results?
    • How might GPRA MA encourage agency engagement with Congress resulting in better "performance-based" program mandates and Federal budgets?

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Keeping Working Waterfronts at Work: A National Perspective on Coastal Communities

    Date: Tuesday, May 31, 2011 at 12 noon EDT

    Speakers and Abstracts:

    Ryck Lydecker, Assistant Vice President for Government Affairs for Boat US
    In the early 2000s, Lydecker witnessed a "waterfront land rush", which led to a loss of marinas, boatyards, and service businesses. Around 2005 and 2006, local solutions to the problems in northern Virginia prompted Lydecker to recognize the need for a larger group effort. Lydecker worked with Tom Murray, from Virginia Sea Grant, to plan the Working Waterways and Waterfronts Symposium in May 2007. Organizers brought together policy makers who had successfully dealt with local problems to share strategies and successes that could be used elsewhere. Today, Lydecker will lead the panel by defining a working waterfront as accepted by the 2007 symposium community.

    Dave Knight, Transportation Specialist with the Great Lakes Commission
    The Great Lakes Commission’s involvement in efforts to preserve and grow working waterfronts has been consistent for much of its 55-year history. Recently, this involvement has been focused on supporting the creation of the Great Lakes Small Harbors Coalition representing federally authorized Great Lakes harbors, both recreational and commercial. The Coalition’s primary emphasis has been on maintaining navigational access to these working waterfronts, impeded in recent years by inadequate dredging. Other stressors to Great Lakes working harbors include threats to the Lakes’ sport and commercial fishery from invasive species. As the Great Lakes states and provinces look to the value of the Great Lakes/St. Lawrence freshwater resource in their job development strategies, the health and welfare of working ports and harbors has emerged as both a regional and national priority.

    Thomas Hymel, Environmental Specialist with LSU AgCenter and Louisiana Sea Grant
    Thomas Hymel and Scott Saunier, an alderman from the Port of Delcambre, will provide a reference to oil ports and the mix of communities surrounding those ports. They will talk about how working waterfronts fit into community sustainability and how, specifically, residents of the Port of Delcambre make a living and where they want to go in the future. Hymel and Saunier will discuss how their seafood marketing technique has increased the sustainability of a small fishing community as well as the expansion of this program to other Gulf Coast fishing communities.

    Heather Mann, Executive Director of Community Seafood Initiative
    Heather will provide a west coast perspective on seafood initiatives and preserving working waterfronts. The Community Seafood Initiative is a 501c(3) organization with offices in Astoria and Newport, Oregon. The Seafood Initiative services the west coast and all of North America. Current projects include Pacific Fish Trax (serving the Pacific, Gulf and Atlantic regions), the Community-Based Education Collaborative, Preserving Seafood-Related Waterfronts, 45° Northwest Fisheries Reports, and the Seafood for Health Project.

    Hugh Cowperthwaite, Fisheries Project Director at Coastal Enterprises, Inc.
    Hugh will highlight two programs that were created within the Maine legislature to support commercial fishing access to the water. The Maine Working Waterfront Coalition successfully helped policy makers to craft Maine’s Working Waterfront Tax Law and the Working Waterfronts Access Pilot Program. The impacts of these two programs on Maine’s coastal communities will be highlighted and both programs have now become national models for preserving working waterfront access. More recent efforts have been focused on the creation of a Nationwide Working Waterfront Coalition and programs that can help all coastal and Great Lake states assure strong working access to the water.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    TITANIC 2010

    Date: Wednesday, June 1, 2011 at 12 noon EDT

    Speaker: James Delgado, Director, Maritime Heritage, NOS Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

    Abstract: James Delgado, Director of the Maritime Heritage Program in the Office of National Marine Sanctuaries, was the chief scientist for the 2010 scientific mapping and documentation of the Titanic wreck site. That project, in cooperation with RMS Titanic Inc./Premier Exhibitions, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, the National Park Service, and NOAA, mapped 25 square miles of seabed and imaged area of the Titanic site never before mapped. The expedition also conducted a detailed three-dimensional scan and completed 3D imaging of Titanic's bow and stern sections. Delgado will share insights into the ongoing saga of Titanic and the documentation of the wreck site as well as preliminary results of the 2010 expedition.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    The AMS DataStreme Education Program: NOAA’s Impact on K-12 Teachers

    Date: Thursday, June 2, 2011 at 12 noon EDT

    Speaker: John D. Moore and the NJ Local Implementation Team

    Powerpoint slides (pdf format)

    Abstract: See how the work of NOAA and NOAA’s educational resources are making a difference in promoting STEM Education in the classroom! Join a group of leaders and teachers from New Jersey and Pennsylvania who participate in the education programs of the American Meteorological Society. This Local Implementation Team for DataStreme Atmosphere, DataStreme Ocean, and Earth Climate System will discuss how they incorporate content, resources, and pedagogy in their classrooms, as well as other collaborative activities in this unique learning community. These education programs are supported through generous contributions from across the NOAA line and staff offices, as well as by NASA and the National Science Foundation.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Collision at the End of the Line: Shipwrecks and Commercial Bottom Fishing

    Date: Tuesday, June 14, 2011 at 12 noon EDT

    Speaker: Joyce Steinmetz, doctoral student, East Carolina University

    Abstract: Ms. Steinmetz's research examines the site formation processes of commercial fish trawling and dredging impacts on mid-Atlantic outer continental shelf shipwrecks. Exploring this human-related interaction required multi-disciplinary sources, including historical research, maritime archaeologists, fishermen who experience damage and loss of gear, and recreational divers who observe shipwreck damage.

    From diver observations 75 to 235 ft. deep, statistical analysis showed 69% of 52 sample shipwrecks had 1 to 5 snagged nets or dredges. The economic loss to the fishing gear owner ranges from $10 to $50K per lost system. Conservatively, $76 million of gear has been lost over 25 years on shipwrecks from Maine to Cape Hatteras. Case studies include the 1847 sidewheel paddle steamer Admiral DuPont, Civil War and early 20th century wrecks, the U.S. Navy tugs Nina and Cherokee, the 1920 submarine USS S-5, and the steam yacht and WWII patrol boat St. Augustine. The last four cases are protected from salvage under the Sunken Military Craft Act of 2005 but commercial fishing is exempt from liability for any damage it causes to such wrecks. Off Delmarva, three rotational scallop gear-restricted areas concentrate gear losses and cultural resource damage.

    Interviews with trawl netters, scallop dredgers, and clam dredgers reveal that each gear type has a different cost and probability of loss. Fishermen cited the accuracy of obstruction locations as a risk factor. Despite the increasingly common use of advanced technologies (hang logs, global positioning systems and chart plotters) by the commercial fishing industry, diver observations confirm that fishermen continue to lose gear. Gear impacts accelerate structural wreck deterioration and scramble or extract historic wreck contents. The purpose of Ms. Steinmetz’s research is to bring factual awareness and provide a foundation for solutions. A successful collision prevention solution could provide economic benefits for fishermen, conserve essential fish habitat, preserve recreational tourism, and safeguard non-renewable underwater cultural resources.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Through a Fish's Eye: The Status of Fish Habitats in the United States, 2010. An assessment from the National Fish Habitat Action Plan (NFHAP)

    Date: Wednesday, June 15, 2011 at 12 noon EDT

    Speaker: Joe Nohner, NOAA/NMFS Office of Science and Technology

    Powerpoint slides (pdf format)

    Abstract: The National Fish Habitat Action Plan (NFHAP) coastal assessment represents an unprecedented nationwide effort to describe the status and threats to estuarine, coastal and marine habitats in the continental United States. The coastal assessment complements a national assessment of inland fish habitat conducted concurrently by scientists at Michigan State University. This study synthesizes existing nation-wide data sets on anthropogenic disturbance and natural drivers affecting estuarine and coastal ecosystems, and includes indicators of land cover, hydrology, eutrophication, and water quality. A quantitative assessment of habitat components was nested into a multiscale spatial framework for the coastal Atlantic, Pacific, and Gulf of Mexico using NOAA’s Coastal Assessment Framework (CAF). A relative disturbance index was developed for each of the four indicators in each estuary spatial unit within the CAF. Composite habitat condition scores were then calculated for each unit by combining the four individual indices to determine the total current risk of habitat degradation. Results of this analysis allow regional and subregional comparisons to be made and identify major sources of habitat degradation in estuarine and coastal habitats. Data limitations prevented some sources of habitat indicator data from being included in the national coastal assessment. Information on sedimentation, shoreline armoring, fish tissue contaminants, and biogenic habitat status will be included in further coastal assessment efforts at the regional level. Next steps for the NFHAP coastal assessment include testing how these scores predict fish species composition and abundance metrics of well-studied stocks. Additional analyses within regions will be completed to further refine habitat conditions and assist in establishing critically degraded areas.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Biology and Conservation of the Diamondback Terrapin, Malaclemys terrapin, in Alabama

    Date: Thursday, June 16, 2011 at 12 noon EDT

    Speaker: Andrew T. Coleman, U.S. Senate Commerce Committee Subcommittee on Oceans, Atmosphere, Fisheries, and Coast Guard (Minority Office)

    Powerpoint slides (pdf format)

    Abstract: The diamondback terrapin, Malaclemys terrapin, is the only North American turtle that is an obligate inhabitant of brackish water environments of salt marshes, bays, and estuaries. The terrapin represents a keystone predator in these habitats and can contribute to maintaining salt marsh integrity. This species has experienced a rich cultural history as it once was considered a gourmet delicacy, even being a required course at White House events. However, many populations were over harvested in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, and they have not been able to rebound due to a number of current threats including crab pot mortality, habitat loss, nest predation, and road mortality. In 2004, a comprehensive study commenced in Alabama with the purpose of gathering baseline data on the survival status of the state’s diamondback terrapin population and the threats it faces. Through a number of field survey methods, it was concluded that the Alabama population existed in several isolated remnant aggregations. The largest aggregation was found to inhabit Cedar Point Marsh, which was the location of a large terrapin farm in the late 1800’s. Because crab pot mortality and nest predation were determined to be the largest threats in Alabama, a recovery strategy was initiated that attempted to address these threats. By-catch reduction devices (BRDs) were developed by Wood (1997) to prevent terrapin entry into pots without inhibiting crab capture, and their efficacy in Alabama was examined. Although crab capture was higher in non-BRD crab pots, BRDs reduced terrapin catch in crab pots by 90%. Also, a head-start program began in 2008, and, by the end of 2011, over 200 turtles will be returned to Cedar Point Marsh where the aggregation was estimated from mark-recapture data to be approximately 340 individuals.

    Note: This seminar is part of the 2011 Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Series

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Loggerhead Sea Turtles: Beyond the Beach

    Date: Thursday, June 16, 2011 at 12:30 PM EDT

    Speaker: Katrina Phillips, NOAA OAR Office of Communications

    Powerpoint slides (pdf format)

    Abstract: The beaches of state of Florida host one of just two rookeries in the world that support more than 10,000 loggerhead nests a year and represent over half of all western Atlantic nesting for the species. Loggerhead nest counts on Florida’s vital nesting beaches have shown a marked decline in the past decade – but what does this tell us about the Atlantic population? While coastal development, erosion and recreational use put a strain on nesting habitats, nest counts for other species which share the same nesting beaches with loggerheads have increased over the same period. To help explain the drop in loggerhead nesting we must look at other factors, such as population dynamics and offshore habitat selection. Very few night-time saturation tagging projects exist in the state of Florida; in-depth evaluation of the long-term datasets that are available may shed light on broader population trends.

    For this study a twenty year mark-recapture dataset from the loggerhead nesting beach on Keewaydin Island, off the southwest coast of Florida, was analyzed using a two-state open robust design model in Program MARK. Parameters such as survival, encounter probability, population size and residence time for this nesting assemblage were estimated and examined for trends over time. The relatively low survival rate estimated for this assemblage shows population decline is an important factor to consider in explaining declining nest counts and highlights the need for specific management to enhance the survival of Florida nesters. The mark-recapture analysis was supplemented with a satellite tracking component to identify the offshore foraging areas utilized by Keewaydin nesters. Eleven nesting females were outfitted with platform terminal transmitters. The released turtles transmitted for 42 to 300+ days, including interesting intervals and subsequent migration to foraging grounds. Site fidelity tests and density kernel home range analyses were used to identify and describe foraging habitats. Females foraging in the eastern Gulf of Mexico were within the recent 64 m bottom longline fishery restriction. While the loggerhead females from this particular nesting beach do not frequent the same foraging area, the sites they selected are near those used by other loggerheads tracked from the western coast of Florida. Areas identified as important habitats during the remigration interval may be used to create targeted management strategies and aid population recovery without the use of broad fishery closures.

    Note: This seminar is part of the 2011 Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Series

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Marching with the Survey: Mapping and Charting the Civil War

    Date: Tuesday June 21 from 1:00 to 3:00 pm

    Speaker: Skip Theberge and John Cloud, NOAA Central Library

    Abstract: The United States Coast Survey was an intrinsic part of the Union effort to quell the rebellion of the Southern States. Coast Survey hydrographers, topographers, and cartographers served the Union in the field in all theaters of the war and in the national capital producing thousands of maps and other products for the Union forces. The Coast Survey developed tactical maps for battlefield commanders, surveyed hostile harbor entrances, and piloted Union vessels in major naval actions of the war. Strategically, the Coast Survey helped plan the Union blockade through the Blockade Strategy Board and then implement it through its "Notes on the Coast of the United States." Even prior to hostilities, the Coast Survey was planning for the eventual conflict and had produced the best available maps of the coastline and major port cities of the South from Chesapeake Bay to the Texas-Mexico border. As in future wars of the United States, Coast Survey skills helped move men and materiel, helped plan major actions, and provided skilled surveyors, engineers, and scouts on the battlefield. This presentation will be an introduction to the Civil War service of the Coast Survey.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Race Against Time: Greek and U.S. Efforts to Protect the Critically Endangered Mediterranean and Hawaiian Monk Seals

    Date: Wednesday, June 22, 2011 at 12 noon EDT

    Speaker: Dr. Alexandros Karamanlidis, MOm/ Hellenic Society for the Study and Protection of the Monk Seal

    Abstract: Monk seals are the only completely tropical species of seal in the world and are in trouble. Centuries of human exploitation and habitat destruction have caused the remaining populations of Mediterranean monk seals (Monachus monachus) and Hawaiian monk seals (Monachus schauinslandi) to drop to perilously low numbers, while the Caribbean monk seal (Monachus tropicalis) has become extinct. Scientists from Greece and the U.S. are in a race against time and are working together from opposite sides of the World to save the remaining monk seals. The MOm/Hellenic Society for the Study and Protection of the Monk Seal is a non-profit, non-governmental organization with over 20 years of experience in the research and conservation of Mediterranean monk seals in Greece and abroad. Researchers at MOm have gained rare insights in the biology and behavior of the Mediterranean monk seal, including recent innovative technology that has enabled the seals to be monitored remotely inside their breeding caves. Current and future collaborations with U.S. scientists who study Hawaiian monk seals will provide important insights into new ways to help the two remaining species of monk seals survive into the future.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Steps towards a Web Data Laboratory: data analysis for the 21st Century

    Date: Thursday, June 23, 2011 at 12 noon EDT

    Speaker: Benno Blumenthal, Data Library Manager, Climate Monitoring and Dissemination, International Research Institute for Climate and Society

    Abstract: Scientific progress is increasingly predicated on accessing and analyzing increasingly larger datasets with increasingly complicated descriptive-metadata and use-metadata. Jointly-analyzing datasets frequently involves a multitude of transformations, different formats, different time and spatial resolution, different projections, and different systems for expressing that necessary use-metadata.

    Our working example is composed of the datasets and some of the metadata in the IRI/LDEO Climate Data Library. These data services enable access and analysis by providing data in a framework which allows format translation, rendering, and application of a variety of analysis functions, including sampling, averaging, regridding, EOFs, and statistical operators. Datasets are both local and remote, allowing a federation of data servers to appear in a uniform space of data access and functionality.

    Describing the library's contents requires concepts like datasets, units, dependent variables, and independent variables. These datasets have been provided under diverse frameworks that have varied levels of associated metadata. We have created an RDF expression of a taxonomy that forms the basis of a dynamic earth data search interface. The concepts include location, time, quantity, realm, author, and institution. We have also started cross-walking these metadata into various existing metadata schema, so that our data can be found in the corresponding systems.

    Building and expanding upon such systems, one can envision a future where not only are definitive versions of datasets and standard analyses of ever-larger datasets rapidly available on request, but that chains of analysis can be built non-programatically with equally accessible results.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Scientists, Watermen, and Conflict in the Maryland Chesapeake Oyster Fishery, 1880-2011

    Date: Friday, June 24, 2011 at 12 noon EDT

    Speaker: Christine Keiner, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Science, Technology, and Society/Public Policy Department, Rochester Institute of Technology

    Abstract: Dr. Keiner will discuss her book The Oyster Question, for which she relied upon the valuable resources of the NOAA Central Library. Using insights from the history of biology, environmental history, agricultural history, and other fields, the book challenges standard interpretations of the oyster fishery as the epitome of the "tragedy of the commons," and addresses the role of historical knowledge in influencing contemporary estuarine resource-use policymaking. The Oyster Question: Scientists, Watermen, and the Maryland Chesapeake Bay since 1880 (published by the University of Georgia Press) won the 2010 Forum for the History of Science in America Prize and co-won the Maryland Historical Trust's Heritage Book Award, as well as Honorable Mention for the Frederick Jackson Turner Award from the Organization of American Historians.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    An assessment of radionuclide activity and associated human health risks in the United States Arctic

    Date: Thursday, July 7, 2011 at 12 noon EDT

    Speaker: Jawed Hameedi, Ph.D., National Ocean Service, National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science

    Abstract: Different sources of artificial radionuclides have contaminated the United States Arctic coastal and marine environments during the past several decades, including nuclear weapon tests fallout, discharges from nuclear reprocessing plants, leakage from underground nuclear tests, and dumped research materials. Ecological and human health concerns about radionuclide contamination in the region were heightened by the April 1993 disclosure of widespread dumping of nuclear reactors and wastes in the Arctic and northern Pacific Oceans by the former Soviet Union. Responding to those concerns, NOAA participated in a study to characterize the marine environment and biota of the US Arctic in terms of artificial radionuclides. Surficial sediment and biological samples, both vertebrate and invertebrate, from the Beaufort Sea, Norton Sound and Bristol Bay were analyzed for the anthropogenic radionuclides 137Cs, 90Sr, 238Pu, 239Pu, 240Pu and 241Am; a few naturally occurring radionuclides (40K, 212Pb, and 214Pb) were also measured. Tissue samples from animals of subsistence value were analyzed to determine the radiation exposures and health risks to coastal inhabitants of the North Slope Borough. The activity of anthropogenic radionuclides in biological samples was very low; for example 137Cs activity levels, measured by both high resolution gamma spectroscopy and on chemically isolated Cs, in animals of the marine food chain were predominantly less than 1 Bq/kg. In contrast, 137Cs activity levels in caribou tissues (muscle, liver, kidney and rumen) were between 24 and 36 Bq/kg. Radioactivity data, combined with per capita consumption of subsistence-harvested foods in three villages (Barrow, Kaktovik and Nuiqsut) were used to derive age-dependent committed effective dose from 137Cs and 90Sr exposure through ingestion. The calculated dose levels for 137Cs were: 2.2 µSv (Barrow), 5.91 µSv (Kaktovik) and 9.06 µSv (Nuiqsut) for adults; levels for 90Sr were much lower. Caribou meat consumption contributed more than 95% of the dose in the case of 137Cs, and fish consumption contributed more than 60% of the 90Sr dose. In all cases, the estimated dose was very small; 0.01 mSv dose is considered negligible in terms of human health risks. The results also indicate that the internal radiation doses from subsistence foods are due to natural background and fallout from atmospheric nuclear weapons testing. In terms of source attribution of the radionuclides, the measured 240Pu/239Pu atom ratios in sediment from the Beaufort, Norton Sound and Bristol Bay samples were very close to the generally accepted ratio from global fallout (0.180 ± 0.014): 0.19 ± 0.02 in Beaufort Sea (n=14), 0.20 ± 0.01 in Norton Sound (n=15), 0.19 ± 0.01 off Yukon River Delta (n=6), and 0.20 ± 0.01 in Bristol Bay (n=12). 241Am activity was low and when detected at significant levels, its ratio with 239+240Pu alpha activity was indicative of global fallout. There was no detectable 238Pu activity. These data, as originally intended, serve as a baseline about radionuclide activity in the region against which future changes may be assessed.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Among Giants, a Life with Whales

    Date: Friday, July 8, 2011 at 12 noon EDT

    Speaker: Flip Nicklin, Whale Trust

    Abstract: In the early days of live cetacean research, scientists were trying to learn more, to take whales from fantasy to reality, but they only got glimpses when the animals surfaced to breathe. Only a diver could see these enormous animals in their own world, and a diver who could, like the whales, take a great gulp of air and move into the depths without scuba gear, because the bubbles might disturb the animals. There was a young diver who did that well - and one day in 1979 he dove down to a humpback "singing" in the waters off Maui and took a picture of it. The whale was Frank. The young diver was Flip Nicklin. And that day with Frank led to a career that opened new ground not just in under-water photography but in the whole field of marine mammalogy.

    Widely regarded as the world’s leading cetacean photographer, Flip Nicklin grew up around his father’s small dive shop on the California coast. He went on to become National Geographic’s premiere whale photographer and marine mammal specialist. In the past 30 years Flip has photographed more than thirty species of whales and dolphins, some so endangered their survival is in question. In 2001 he co-founded Whale Trust, a non-profit organization dedicated to research and public education. He has most recently been named North American Nature Photography Association’s (NANPA) Outstanding Nature Photographer of the Year, 2012. For three decades, Flip has photographed sperm whales in the Indian Ocean; minke whales off the Great Barrier Reef; belugas, bowheads, and narwhals in the High Arctic; right whales off Patagonia; blue whales in the Pacific…not to mention many, many humpbacks off Maui. Flip will show some of these images and discuss his recently published book "Among Giants, a Life with Whales".

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    An Ecosystem Perspective for Fisheries Management

    Date: Tuesday, July 26, 2011 at 12 noon EDT

    Speaker: Jason Link, NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service, Northeast Fisheries Science Center

    Powerpoint Slides (pdf format)

    Abstract: In a recent study, Dr. Jason Link and colleagues reviewed options for incorporating realistic estimates of predation mortality into stock assessments. They concluded that traditional, single-species population models generally underestimate the effects of predation on target species when predation is assumed to be low and constant rather than variable as predator and other prey populations change. The researchers found that including predation leads to more accurate estimates of total population size and more conservative biological reference points, or stock-specific benchmarks. The authors recommend adopting some of the existing methods they reviewed in order to incorporate ecological interactions into stock assessments.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    The Atlantic Coastal Fish Habitat Partnership: Strategic Conservation on a Regional Scale

    Date: Friday, July 29, 2011 at 12 noon EDT

    Speaker: Emily Greene, Atlantic Coastal Fish Habitat Partnership Coordinator, Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission, Arlington, VA

    Powerpoint Slides

    Abstract: The Atlantic Coastal Fish Habitat Partnership (ACFHP) is a coast-wide partnership of fish habitat resource managers, scientists, and communications professionals from 30 different state, federal, tribal, and non-governmental entities. Working from the headwaters of coastal draining rivers to the edge of the continental shelf, and from Maine to the Florida Keys, ACFHP seeks to accelerate the protection, restoration, and enhancement of habitat for native Atlantic coastal, estuarine dependent and diadromous fishes. ACFHP is developing goals, objectives, action strategies and priorities to guide conservation efforts along the Atlantic coast. Its draft goals include protecting and maintaining healthy aquatic systems, preventing further degradation of aquatic habitats, and restoring degraded aquatic habitats. Towards this end, the Partnership seeks to secure, leverage, and distribute resources for on-the-ground fish habitat conservation projects. This presentation will summarize its strategic planning efforts, to date and highlight progress on the Partnership’s initial restoration work.

    Remote access via webinar will NOT be available.


    An Introduction and Update of the Urban Water Federal Partnership

    Date: Thursday, August 11, 2011 at 12 noon EDT

    Speaker: Simeon Hahn, Regional Resource Coordinator, National Ocean Service, Office of Response and Restoration

    Presentation Slides (pdf)

    Abstract: The Urban Water Federal Partnership (UWFP) is 11 Federal Agencies, jointly signing a statement of Vision, Mission and Principles on June 24, 2011 to help urban and metropolitan areas, particularly those that are under-served or economically distressed, as they restore and protect urban water quality, revitalize adjacent neighborhoods, and reconnect to their urban waterways. With the application of federal, state and local tools, the partnership will leverage existing assets to promote short-term and long-term actions towards local urban water revitalization goals. The Guiding Principles of the Partnership are to:

    • Promote clean urban waters.
    • Reconnect people to their waterways.
    • Promote Water conservation.
    • Use urban water systems as a way to promote economic revitalization and prosperity.
    • Encourage community improvements through active partnerships.
    • Be open and honest, and listen to the communities, knowing this is the best way to engage them and learn from them.
    • Focus on measuring results and evaluation will fuel future success.

    The Partnership chose seven locations in which to start work:

    • Anacostia River Watershed (Washington DC/Maryland)
    • Patapsco River Watershed ( Baltimore, Maryland)
    • Bronx & Harlem River Watersheds (New York)
    • South Platte River (Denver)
    • Los Angeles River Watershed (California)
    • Lake Pontchartrain Area (New Orleans, LA)
    • Northwest Indiana Area/ Calumet River

    The presentation will present more background on the initiative, including information on the pilots, and discuss NOAA participation to date as well as future considerations.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Life history pattern diversity, movements, and habitat use of juvenile coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) in the Grays River Estuary, WA

    Date: Thursday, August 18, 2011 at 12 noon EDT

    Speaker: Bethany E. Craig, Fisheries Scientific Advisory Coordinator, Office of Science and Technology, NOAA Fisheries

    Abstract: Recent studies suggest that juvenile coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) exhibit a variety of life history patterns in addition to the "stream-type" freshwater rearing life history traditionally thought to dominate coho salmon populations. Sub-yearling downstream migrants or "nomads" represent one of these alternative life history patterns. Recent work suggests that nomads may contribute substantially to adult coho salmon populations. Over the duration of two cohorts (2008-2009), we used catch data, diet and growth, and scale analyses to document the composition, outmigration chronology and habitat use of juvenile coho salmon among their freshwater spawning habitats and tidal freshwater estuary rearing habitats. Catch data shows bimodal migrations of subyearling nomad coho salmon into the estuary and suggests that spring migrating nomads rear in the estuary for an extended period of time. Nomads used a variety of estuarine habitats, but were most frequently caught within off-channel habitats including tidal freshwater forested wetlands and emergent wetlands. Scale pattern analysis showed that nomads have significantly higher growth rates than their subyearling counterparts who remain and rear in freshwater upriver habitat. We observed similar life history patterns among years, suggesting that these patterns are relatively stable, even if the benefits of any particular pattern may vary. Scale pattern analysis of adult scales verified evidence of a variety of juvenile life history patterns. The presence of available and productive wetland habitat in the lower reaches of the river may allow for expression of these nomad life history patterns. These results point to the importance of the preservation, conservation, and restoration of a diverse network of interconnected habitat throughout a watershed.

    Note: This seminar is part of the 2011 Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Series

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Coastal CHARM and the We-Table: New Technology for Participatory Democracy on the Coast

    Date: Tuesday, August 23, 2011 at 12 noon EDT

    Speaker: John Jacob, Texas Sea Grant and Texas A&M University

    Abstract: Powerful tools such as geographic information systems (GIS) enable the analysis of ever more complex layers of data, making it possible to facilitate much more rational, science-based decisions about coastal planning than previously possible. But this complexity makes it ever more difficult for coastal citizens to meaningfully engage in the community planning process. Without the full engagement of coastal citizens, even what appears to be the best choice based on unbiased science may turn out to be completely un-implementable. What is urgently needed are what the philosopher Ivan Illich referred to as “tools for conviviality.” These are tools that facilitate participatory democracy, tools that enable non-expert citizens to engage complex data sets in meaningful ways.

    The Texas Coastal Watershed Program, part of Texas Sea Grant and Texas AgriLife Extension, has been working with two new tools that show considerable promise as tools of conviviality. The first is the We-Table, which transforms an ordinary tabletop into an interactive computer interface. This very affordable participation tool allows teams to collaboratively explore and use computer-based data and programs in a workshop setting. The We-Table enhances what people use daily--tables and pens-- while the supporting technology works quietly in the background. This means that participants can easily use the interface with very little instruction, and it allows them to work with what matters most in a meeting: data, maps, and their fellow participants.

    The second tool is the Coastal CHARM (Community Health and Resource Management) model. Coastal CHARM is built with CommunityViz software, a plugin to the well-known ARC GIS software. CommunityViz is itself a “convivial” adaptation of ARCGIS that facilitates development of scenarios. CHARM uses the CommunityViz platform to array a wide spectrum of coastal natural resource and demographic data in a user-friendly framework. CHARM incorporates many different impact coefficients for different kinds of development patterns, including, for example, impervious surfaces, water usage, polluted runoff loadings, flood proofing costs, hurricane surge impacts, etc. Participants use the CHARM interface to “paint” different future development patterns on the landscape, and then evaluate the overall impact of each development scenario.

    I review here the initial piloting of the We-Table/CHARM tools at a workshop enabled by the recent Sea Grant Coastal Community Climate Adaptation Initiative. In this exercise, participants were instructed to place the projected 410,000 people expected within 30 years on the western shores of Galveston Bay. Five We-Tables enabled over 40 participants to paint the target area with various gradations of diffuse auto-oriented development and more compact, walkable patterns onto a landscape they knew well. Participants compared their scenarios immediately after the exercise in terms of impacts to the placed population (e.g., flooding and storm surge) as well as impacts to the environment (e.g., wetland loss, nitrogen loadings). A sea-level-rise slider allowed the participants to see how much more area would be flooded under real (e.g., Carla, Ike) or hypothetical storms (e.g. Carly) and various SLR scenarios.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Coastal and Island Watershed Management Tools and Initiatives - an Update from the Center for Watershed Protection

    Date: Thursday, September 1, 2011 at 12 noon EDT

    Speakers: Karen Cappiella (Director of Research) and Dave Hirschman (Program Director), Center for Watershed Protection

    Abstract: The Center for Watershed Protection will provide an update on the results and progress of several coastal and island watershed management initiatives over the past few years. With funding from the Cooperate Institute for Coastal and Estuarine Environmental Technology (CICEET), we developed tools to manage the impacts of land use and stormwater runoff on water resources of the Atlantic coastal plain. The resulting Coastal Plain Watershed Information Center contains products such as an article series on adapting watershed protection tools for the coastal plain, a coastal community watershed management self-assessment checklist, case studies of successful low impact development (LID) application in the coastal plain, and a photo library and slideshow for use in educating decision makers about the importance and applicability of LID in the coastal plain. Other coastal watershed work has included refinement of techniques for detecting illicit discharges in coastal waters, and, working with Maryland Sea Grant, efforts to assist coastal communities with adapting to climate change.

    Our island watershed work includes efforts to improve watershed and stormwater management on Pacific Islands working with the Horsley Witten Group and NOAA's Coral Reef program. The work has involved developing a watershed plan framework for the Piti-Asan watershed in Guam, revising (soon to be adopted, we hope!) Guam's erosion control and stormwater regulations, adapting stormwater BMP designs to island applications, conducting pollution prevention training in Saipan, CNMI, and providing watershed training for various audiences. Most recently, the Center, Horsley Witten, and NOAA hosted the Pacific Island Watershed Institute in Hawaii. In the Caribbean, we have been working with NOAA Restoration Partners and NFWF to coordinate implementation of the watershed management plan for Guanica Bay in Puerto Rico- including studies to evaluate the potential effects of restoring the Guanica lagoon, a feasibility study for constructing a treatment wetland to enhance pollutant removal at the Guanica wastewater treatment plant and startup of a roundtable to discuss how to improve the market for shade grown coffee in Puerto Rico- as well as implementation of stormwater retrofits in La Parguerra, PR.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Pedaling Climate: A bike trip across the country, talking about climate

    Date: Wednesday, September 7, 2011 at 12 noon EDT

    Speaker: David Goodrich, NOAA Climate Program Office (retired)

    Abstract: After retiring from the NOAA Climate Program Office in January, the author left on a coast-to-coast bicycle ride in May. The trip ran 4205 miles, with quite a few adventures, including holding Lincoln's axe in Illinois, having a tornado party in Missouri, climbing a 10,200' pass in Colorado and camping at a uranium ghost town in Wyoming. In the process there were presentations to 17 groups at 11 different venues about climate change. Some of the impacts of climate change along the way were hard to avoid: sea level rise in Delaware; drought in Kansas; and forest loss in the Rockies. Some ideas and strategies for communicating the issues of climate will be proposed.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    The Okinawa Dugong: Application of Section 402 of the National Historic Preservation Act

    Date: Tuesday, September 13, 2011 at 12 noon EDT

    Speaker: Mark Spalding, President of the Ocean Foundation

    Powerpoint Presentation

    Abstract: Please join us on Tuesday, September 13th, from noon to 1:00 p.m. in the NOAA Central Library (SSMC3, 2nd Floor) for a brown bag presentation by Mark Spalding, President of the Ocean Foundation, on Okinawa Dugong v. Gates. The case involves the application of Section 402 of the National Historic Preservation Act to a federal project outside of the United States likely to affect the Okinawa Dugong, a marine mammal classified as vulnerable by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature.

    In Dugong, plaintiffs challenged the U.S. Defense Department’s plan to build an airbase off the coast of the Japanese island, Okinawa, and DOD’s failure to consider – as required by section 402 of the National Historic Preservation Act - the impacts of its plans on the Okinawa Dugong, a marine mammal species listed as a protected "natural monument" on the Japanese Register of Cultural Properties. The case presents an unusual example of the use of U.S. historic preservation law to protect natural heritage outside of the United States. Mr. Spalding will discuss the case, and more broadly the relationship between domestic and international law.

    Note: This seminar is sponsored by the Office of General Counsel for International Law.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Blue Carbon – Another Reason to Love Coastal Habitats

    Date: Wednesday, September 14, 2011 at 12 noon EDT

    Speaker: Linwood Pendleton, Acting Chief Economist, NOAA PPI; and Emily Pidgeon, Conservation International

    Linwood Pendleton's Powerpoint Slides

    Emily Pidgeon's Powerpoint Slides

    Abstract: Did you know that coastal habitats such as mangroves, salt marshes, and sea grasses store significant amounts of carbon and have great potential for greenhouse gas mitigation? Dazzle your colleagues and friends with your newfound knowledge of international and U.S. efforts to better understand and protect the use of these coastal habitats for carbon storage and sequestration. You’ll learn the answers to questions including:

    • What do we know about how coastal habitats affect global carbon fluxes?
    • How can "blue carbon" help protect coastal habitats?
    • What are some of the hot national and international opportunities related to "blue carbon"?
    • What is NOAA’s role with respect to “blue carbon”? How might blue carbon play a role in your office?

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Foraging behavior and habitat associations of newly independent northern fur seal pups (Callorhinus ursinus)

    Date: Thursday, September 15, 2011 at 12 noon EDT

    Speaker: Olivia Lee, Integrative Programs Section in the Division of Ocean Sciences at the National Science Foundation

    Abstract: Northern fur seal pups and juveniles experience the highest mortality rates at sea compared to other age groups, but our knowledge of this life stage remains limited because individuals may not return to shore for 2 years after leaving their rookeries. The foraging behavior and habitat associations of 35 newly independent pups from Bering Island, Russia were investigated using Mk-10AL satellite tags to track pup locations and diving behavior between November 2007 and March 2008. Stomach temperature telemetry was used to identify the duration and timing of ingestion events for the first time in wide-ranging pups. Pup locations were compared to the distribution of several oceanographic features using remotely sensed data including: chlorophyll a concentrations, bathymetry, sea surface temperature, and eddies. Monte Carlo logistic modeling was used to identify the habitat associations of pups, and we compared pup behavior to the known habitat associations of adult females. Pups showed a strong association with regions with high chlorophyll a concentrations, high sea surface temperatures, and greater distances from shore. There was a negative correlation between pup locations and water depth, and pups had no association with eddies. However, pups that encountered eddies during their migration had the longest ingestion events near eddy peripheries. The results indicate that although pups are attracted to certain oceanographic features that may indicate higher prey abundance, they may have not yet learned to take advantage of prey-rich regions associated with eddies.

    Note: This seminar is part of the 2011 Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Series

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Halophyte Hydroponics: Exploring the Feasibility of Extracting Excess Nitrogen from Shrimp Aquaculture with Atriplex hortensis, an Edible Crop

    Date: Thursday, September 15, 2011 at 12:30 PM EDT

    Speaker: Hui Rodomsky, Coastal Conservation Policy Specialist, NOAA NOS Office of Ocean and Coastal Resource Management

    Abstract: The vast majority of the world’s shrimp supply comes from industrial shrimp farms in the coastal areas of tropical developing countries. Shrimp farming practices degrade tropical coastal ecosystems in many ways, including conversion of mangrove forests, soil salinization, and eutrophication of coastal waters. Shrimp pond water quality is maintained by constant water exchange with the surrounding environment. This constant water exchange stresses freshwater resources in the area, and the discharged effluent alters the water chemistry of coastal ecosystems. This research addresses the eutrophication of coastal waters and explores the feasibility of growing halophytes hydroponically to extract excess nitrogen from the pond water before it is discharged into the surrounding environment.

    This study was conducted in Hilo, Hawai’i, situated within the tropics. Five plant coverage levels of the halophyte Atriplex hortensis were tested to examine the effect of relative plant biomass on nitrogen levels in shrimp aquaculture water. Complete block design was implemented with each treatment represented once per block. There were six blocks total, and each block consisted of five 20-gallon glass aquaria nested in a 300-gallon plastic tank filled with freshwater for temperature control. Each glass aquarium was stocked with Pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei, at 100 animals per m2, the stocking density of intensive shrimp farming. The water in the glass aquaria was a mixture of seawater and Hawai’i county water to achieve 20ppt salinity. The only nutrient input to the system was the daily feeding of L. vannamei. A. hortensis was grown hydroponically in floating platforms resting on top of the water. Three forms of nitrogen – nitrate, nitrite, and ammonia – were measured via spectrophotometer weekly over seven weeks.

    The observed rates of decrease for nitrate levels were 1.7 to 2.2 times greater in treatments with plants than in the control treatment. This suggests that incorporating A. hortensis into the shrimp aquaculture system can lower the concentration of nitrate in the water. As A. hortensis is edible, a second crop could be produced from this nitrate mitigation method with no additional nitrogen input. There is potential for halophyte hydroponics to be developed as a way to remove excess nitrate from shrimp farm effluent.

    Note: This seminar is part of the 2011 Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Series

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Modeling Ecosystem Service Values of Wetlands in Delaware: an Application of the InVEST Model

    Date: Thursday, September 22, 2011 at 12 noon EDT

    Speakers: Maura Flight, Senior Associate at IEc and Chip Paterson, Principal at IEc

    Powerpoint Slides

    Abstract: Wetlands cover over 30 percent of the State of Delaware. These ecosystems are being threatened, in particular, by development associated with the growing state population. Wetlands serve a variety of ecosystem functions, including surface water retention, nutrient transformation, coastal storm surge detention, species habitat, and carbon sequestration. Our analysis links wetland functions in Delaware to ecosystem services - the contributions that these functions make to the well-being of human populations - for purposes of economic valuation.

    There is little disagreement that wetland ecosystem functions provide valuable services. The relationship of some services, such as recreation, to wetlands is more apparent than others, for example, flood protection. From a social welfare perspective, failure to incorporate the values of as full a suite of ecosystem services as possible may result in inefficient resource management (i.e., the total value of goods and services provided by the landscape is not maximized). Our analysis demonstrates a framework designed to evaluate tradeoffs in multiple ecosystem services of land and resource management scenarios. Specifically, we apply the Natural Capital Project’s Integrated Valuation of Ecosystem Services and Tradeoffs (InVEST) tool to quantify changes in carbon storage and sequestration, water purification, flood protection, and biodiversity associated with projected wetland losses in Delaware. The InVEST approach advances the science of ecosystem services assessment and valuation by employing spatially-explicit ecological production functions to quantify net changes in the delivery of ecosystem services resulting from specified land use or management changes. Quantifying the net change as opposed to the absolute value of services allows decision-makers to consider tradeoffs associated with marginal changes in ecosystem functions, and provides more meaningful estimates to inform policy. The results of our analysis, both biophysical and economic endpoints, provide additional information regarding less transparent ecosystem services of wetlands to support efficient landscape-level land use planning.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    The ecology of narwhals in Baffin Bay and the impacts of a warming climate

    Date: Tuesday, October 4, 2011 at 12 noon EDT

    Speaker: Kristin Laidre, arctic ecologist at the Polar Science Center, Applied Physics Lab, University of Washington

    Abstract: The offshore pack ice is one of the most important habitats for narwhals (Monodon monoceros), yet few data are available to quantify ecological relationships. Winter movements of narwhals (n=34) satellite-tagged between 2003 and 2005 on Baffin Island were combined with data on distribution and abundance collected from a visual aerial survey on the wintering grounds conducted in April 2008 to examine habitat use in the pack ice. Continuous high-resolution digital photographic sea ice images (n= 2,685) and downward-looking video were also collected on the survey tracklines facilitating a detailed description of the habitat. A fully corrected abundance estimate of 17,239 narwhals (cv=0.58) was calculated for the 9,500 sq. km area, which had only 2% open water. Narwhals ranged most widely and had the highest velocities in years with the most dense sea ice cover, but remained stationary over their preferred foraging grounds in years with low sea ice cover. This may suggest heavy sea ice requires whales to conduct compensatory movements to keep up with leads and cracks that move up to 25 km/day. Some whales were tagged with transmitters which collected and transmitted water column temperature profiles from dives >1,000 m between December and April 2005-2007, a project funded by the NOAA Ocean Exploration program. Data from these tags suggest the previously documented warming in Baffin Bay continued through 2007 and is associated with a warmer West Greenland Current in both of its constituent water masses. Understanding narwhal habitat use in the pack ice is critical to this species given climate change induced sea ice loss rates of 9% decade in Baffin Bay.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    The XML Hydrographic Metadata System and the Hydrographic Survey Metadata Data Base (HSMDB)

    Date: Thursday, October 6, 2011 at 12 noon EDT

    Speaker: Daniel Neumann, IT Specialist, Hydrographic Surveys Division, NOAA Office of Coast Survey

    Abstract: Metadata is crucial for the efficient archiving and retrieval of hydrographic survey data. Currently, hydrographic metadata is created in multiple formats and housed in manually populated databases. NOAA’s Office of Cost Survey (OCS) is developing tools, using eXtensible Markup Language (XML), to enable NOAA to provide structured XML packaging of information that will allow metadata to be constrained and parsed more efficiently for multiple outputs. When completed, this will support a more efficient, semi-automated workflow for capturing metadata throughout the hydrographic survey lifecycle. This lifecycle is from initial project instructions to final descriptive reports and other supporting documents. Part of the improved workflow is eliminating the manual input of metadata to the authoritative HSMDB at the National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC). Timely automated update will free Hydrographic survey Division (HSD) data control resources to focus on HSMDB population of archived hydrographic surveys. This will in turn enable different user communities to easily query and harvest more historic hydrographic survey information. This presentation will first offer an overview of the current status and proposed end product of the XML system. Secondly, the interaction of this XML as an extract and insert tool for the HSMDB will be explored stressing the notion that "enter once, use multiple times" approach greatly reduces errors, while also increasing efficiency and usability.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Tales and Tails - 41 Sea Years of Texas Sea Grant

    Date: Thursday, October 13, 2011 at 12 noon EDT

    Speaker: Gary Graham, Texas Sea Grant extension agent

    Powerpoint Slides

    Abstract: Gary Graham, longtime fisheries specialist with the Texas Sea Grant Program will present his experiences with the early years of interaction with marine resource users. An overview of cooperative work with the fishing industry to identify and plot trawl obstructions, development of more environmentally acceptable fishing gear and the emotional times which ultimately yielded successes with turtles and TEDs will be discussed. Graham will describe adaptations in working with different minority groups within the fisheries as well as challenges in engaging industry to solve their own problem.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Law and Policies that Apply to NOAA International Agreements

    Date: Wednesday, October 19, 2011 at 12 noon EDT

    Speaker: Hugh Schratwieser, NOAA’s Office of General Counsel for Weather

    Presentation Slides

    Abstract: Please join us on Wednesday, October 19th, from noon to 1:00 p.m. in the NOAA Central Library (SSMC3, 2nd Floor) for a brown bag presentation on the law and policies regarding international agreements and memoranda of understanding between NOAA and counterpart agencies in foreign countries. Hugh Schratwieser of NOAA’s Office of General Counsel for Weather (GCW) will provide an overview of the Case- Zablocki Act and its implementation by NOAA GC. Authority for making determinations under the Case-Zablocki Act for NOAA international agreements was recently delegated to the NOAA General Counsel by the Department of Commerce General Counsel. Angelia Talbert-Duarte of the General Law Division of the Department of Commerce Office of General Counsel will explain the role played by her office in reviewing NOAA’s international agreements as well as an provide an overview of the law and policies that apply when such agreements involve the transfer of funds. There will be ample time for questions from the audience.

    Additional background information is available at http://www.gc.noaa.gov/gc_case_zablocki.html and http://www.commerce.gov/os/ogc/model-agreements.

    Note: This seminar is intended for NOAA employees only. Sponsored by the Office of General Counsel for International Law.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    The Impacts of El Niño Conditions on California Sea Lion Health and Fisheries Interactions: Stranding Hotspots and Management Implications

    Date: Thursday, October 20, 2011 at 12 noon EDT

    Speaker: Amanda Keledjian, Office of Protected Resources in NOAA Fisheries Service

    Abstract: California sea lions, Zalophus californianus, are often viewed as a sentinel species whose health can be affected by prevailing oceanographic conditions and environmental quality. For this reason, it has become increasingly important to study the natural stressors and anthropogenic impacts that can lead to diminished health and survival among individuals of this coastal species. In this study, just over 36,000 sea lion stranding records spanning 1983-2010 were used to first identify regional and seasonal fishing interaction "hotspots" in California, and second, to examine how these hotspots might change under additional environmental stress induced by El Niño oceanographic conditions that can affect prey availability. Analyzing mean monthly fisheries interactions cases (n=2,380) revealed that (1) the number of fisheries interactions has risen over time (as much as 20% in some areas) but the frequency of these strandings relative to abundance estimates has not changed significantly throughout the study period; (2) regional hotspots were identified in Monterey, Los Angeles, and Orange counties; (3) seasonal peaks in fisheries interactions occur May-August along the coast; and (4) fisheries interactions are significantly greater during El Niño periods in all regions studied. These results indicate that over a twenty-seven year period, sea lion health is impacted by oceanographic conditions and anthropogenic stressors that may be heightened in early summer following the weaning period. Spatially- and temporally-explicit data such as these can be useful in dynamically mapping marine mammal health within spatial planning tools. This study could inform adaptive management measures designed to minimize incidental take for this and other pinniped species where they overlap with fisheries on the U.S. West coast.

    Note: This seminar is part of the 2011 Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Series

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Melting Glaciers: A Probable Source of DDT to the Antarctic Marine Ecosystem

    Date: Thursday, October 20, 2011 at 12:30pm EDT

    Speaker: Heidi Geisz, Legislative Fellow with the House Natural Resources Committee subcommittee on Fisheries, Wildlife, Oceans and Insular Affairs

    Abstract: Persistent organic pollutants reach polar regions by long-range atmospheric transport and biomagnify through the food web accumulating in higher trophic level predators. We analyzed Adélie penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae) samples collected from 2004-2006 to evaluate current levels of ∑DDT (p,p’-DDT + p,p’-DDE) in these birds, which are confined to Antarctica. Ratios of p,p’-DDT to p,p’-DDE in Adélie penguins have declined significantly since 1964 indicating current exposure to old rather than new sources of ∑DDT. However, ∑DDT has not declined in Adélie penguins from the Western Antarctic Peninsula for more than 30 years and the presence of p,p’-DDT in these birds indicates that there is a current source of DDT to the Antarctic marine food web. DDT has been banned or severely restricted since peak use in the 1970s, implicating glacier melt-water as a likely source for DDT contamination in coastal Antarctic seas. Our estimates indicate that 1-4 kg*y-1 ∑DDT are currently being released into coastal waters along the Western Antarctic Ice Sheet due to glacier ablation.

    Note: This seminar is part of the 2011 Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Series

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Effects of temperature and latitude on the reproduction of an invasive crab, Hemigrapsus sanguineus, in northern and southern New England

    Date: Friday, November 4, 2011 at 12 noon EDT

    Speaker: Emily Gamelin, Congressional Analysis and Relations Division in NOAA’s Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research

    Presentation Slides

    Abstract: The Asian shore crab, Hemigrapsus sanguineus is native to the western Pacific and was first found in the U.S. in 1988. The species is currently distributed from North Carolina to mid-coast Maine, and has become the dominant intertidal crab in areas south of Boston Harbor, pushing out the previous dominant, the European Green crab (Carcinus maenas). H. sanguineus populations were studied in northern and southern New England to determine if crabs differ in reproductive behavior or characteristics between these regions. Additionally, effects of temperature on reproductive activity were quantified through laboratory experiments.

    Number of broods per season increased with temperature, but the seasonal total was limited to three broods per female crab in laboratory experiments. Broods experienced limited success at the lowest temperature tested, 10°C. The reproductive season was longer at lower latitudes, and females at this site had smaller average ovigerous size. Patterns of ovigery varied between the regions, suggesting the production of one brood per season for most female crabs in New Hampshire, compared to two to three broods per season per female in Rhode Island. Overall, temperature may limit the possibility and degree of reproductive output by females, which may slow the spread or limit establishment of this species in northern latitudes.

    Note: This seminar is part of the 2011 Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Series

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Below the surface of the salt marsh: How water and nutrients move through estuary wetlands

    Date: Friday, November 4, 2011 at 12:30 PM EDT

    Speaker: Matthew Lettrich, Estuarine Reserves Division (NOAA/NOS/OCRM)

    Presentation Slides

    Abstract: Coastal wetlands serve as sources and sinks of nitrogen to surrounding estuarine waters through advective drainage and denitrification. The advective nitrogen flux of three intertidal estuary wetlands in the New River Estuary in North Carolina was determined using two approaches; 1) Darcy-derived drainage measurements; and 2) Calculating the difference between tidal ebb and tidal flood flux. The magnitude of drainage was greatest and most closely linked to tidal elevation in the most down-estuary site and was least in the up-estuary site ranging from a daily mean drainage of 0.34 L m shoreline-1 day-1 in the up-estuary site to 87 L m shoreline-1 day-1 in the down-estuary site. Nitrogen concentrations in the marsh porewaters peaked in late 2009. N flux was determined as a function of drainage (water flux) and porewater N concentration. Advective N flux showed a seasonal pattern that increased in the summer and the winter. Drainage was found to be correlated to tidal elevation within each site and trended with tidal amplitude within the estuary, providing proxies for estimating advective N flux at other sites when given those easily measured parameters combined with porewater N concentration.

    Note: This seminar is part of the 2011 Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Series

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    New Business Models for Small-Scale Fishermen and Processors

    Date: Thursday, November 10, 2011 at 12 noon EST

    Speakers: Barry Nash, Seafood Technology and Marketing Specialist, NC Sea Grant; and Susan Andreatta, Associate Professor, University of North Carolina Greensboro Department of Anthropology

    Presentation Slides (pdf format)
    View the WebEx Recording (wrf format, requires you to download the free WRF player).

    Abstract: Historically, small-scale fishermen and processors along the southeastern United States have been an invisible industry. They earned a steady living supplying local residents and metropolitan areas of the Eastern Seaboard of the United States with quality, seasonal seafood without a well-recognized commercial image to identify their commodities or trade. As globalization began opening domestic markets to less expensive products, price became a deciding sales factor in consumer choices. Facing significant declines in market share and income, fishermen began abandoning their industry. Over the last decade, the demand for local seafood has grown stronger as consumers become more conscious of the origins of their food. The growing public demand for local seafood offers opportunities for producers to tap niche markets to stabilize and increase their incomes. This presentation will discuss how the Sea Grant network can offer practical guidance to help fishermen and processors build market-focused enterprises that create competitive advantages over foreign producers.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    The future of NOAA’s Technology Transfer: Meeting the President's challenge

    Date: Tuesday, December 6, 2011 at 12 noon EST

    Speakers: Henry Wixon and Mark Madsen, DOC Legal Counsel for NIST

    Abstract: The goal of Federal technology transfer is to promote public/private sector partnerships that enhance U.S. competitiveness and leverage the Nation’s investment in Federal Research and Development. The Presidential Memorandum, Accelerating Technology Transfer and Commercialization of Federal Research in Support of High-Growth Businesses, issued October 28, 2011, directs that each agency with Federal laboratories develop plans that establish performance goals to increase the number and pace of effective technology transfer and commercialization activities in partnership with non federal entities, including private firms, research organizations, and non-profit entities.

    This seminar will cover the impact of President Obama’s directive on NOAA Managers and Scientists. Questions and answers are expected to address exactly what technology transfer is, why the President has addressed its importance and what mechanisms are available within NOAA.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Does Tidal Management Affect Sub-adult Fish Assemblages in South Carolina’s Historic Impounded Marshes?

    Date: Thursday, December 8, 2011 at 12 noon EST

    Speaker: Ben L. Carswell, East Coast Regional Coordinator, NOAA Marine Debris Program, Office of Response and Restoration, National Ocean Service

    Powerpoint Slides (pdf format)

    Abstract: As much as 14% (28,593 ha) of South Carolina’s coastal marshes are restricted by impoundments. Most impounded marshes in South Carolina are relics of rice agriculture that flourished in many areas of the coastal Southeast circa 1760 – 1860. Near Beaufort, SC, the Nemours Wildlife Foundation (NWF) manages 809 hectares of impounded marshes and wetlands with the primary goal of maximizing waterfowl habitat. A minority of the Nemours impoundments are managed to maximize recreational fisheries. Water-level in the impoundments is central to each strategy and is controlled with a system of tide gates. "Waterfowl" management promotes production of habitat for migratory birds, a goal that demands prolonged restriction of tidal connectivity. "Fish" management aims to promote an abundance of sport fish and allows daily tidal exchange. Tidal restriction raises concerns about how fragmentation and habitat change may affect nursery function for fishes. Our research examined assemblage composition, diversity, and abundance of fishes during early life stages, a phase that has received little attention in studies of coastal impoundments. We used light traps and a push net to sample two impoundments of each management type monthly for 10 months. We collected 61,527 sub-adult fishes, representing 21 species and 16 families, in light traps and 12,670 sub-adult fishes, representing 13 species and 11 families, in push net samples. The effective number of species detected at larval stages in "fish" impoundments (summer mean=2.52±0.20, winter mean=2.02±0.66) was greater than in "waterfowl" impoundments (summer mean=1.27±0.14, winter mean=1.06±0.09); confidence intervals are 90%. Species richness did not differ between management types, but hierarchical linear modeling predicts differences in assemblage composition. Our findings underscore the importance of daily water exchange in promoting nursery function for transient fishes in managed coastal impoundments.

    Note: This seminar is part of the 2011 Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Series

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Waterscape genetics of the yellow perch (Perca flavescens): Patterns across large connected ecosystems and isolated relict populations

    Date: Thursday, December 8, 2011 at 12:30pm EST

    Speaker: Jhonatan Sepulveda Villet, NOAA Great Lakes Habitat Restoration Program

    Powerpoint Slides (pdf format)

    Abstract: Comparisons of a species’ genetic diversity and divergence patterns across large connected populations versus isolated relict areas, provide important data for understanding potential response to global warming and other perturbations. Aquatic taxa offer ideal case studies for interpreting these patterns, because their dispersal and gene flow often are constrained through narrow connectivity channels that have changed over geological time and from contemporary anthropogenic alterations. Our research objective is to understand the interplay between historic (climate change, lake basin formation, and channel connectivity shifts during and after the Pleistocene glaciations) and modern-day factors (fishery exploitation, stocking supplementation, and habitat loss) in shaping population genetic patterns of the yellow perch Perca flavescens (Percidae: Teleostei) across its native North American range. We employ a dual genome and modified landscape genetic approach, analyzing complete sequences from the mitochondrial DNA control region (912 base pairs) and 15 nuclear DNA microsatellite loci of 664 spawning adults from 24 locations. Results support contribution from three primary glacial refugia to contemporary northern populations; the Missourian refugium founded the Northwest Lake Plains and western Lake Superior, the Mississippian refugium colonized most of the Great Lakes, and the Atlantic refugium contributed to the lower Great Lakes and founded the northern Atlantic seaboard. Genetic diversity is highest in southern unglaciated populations, and is appreciable in northern areas that were founded from multiple refugia. Divergence is greater in isolated population sites, both north and south; the southern Gulf coast relict populations are the most divergent, reflecting their long history. Understanding the influence of past and current waterway connections on the genetic structure of yellow perch populations may help us to assess the role of ongoing climate change towards conserving aquatic biodiversity.

    Note: This seminar is part of the 2011 Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Series

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Annual Holiday Brown Bag Seminar


    A NOAA Top Ten List from Mary Glackin’s Perspective

    Date: Tuesday, December 13, 2011 at 12 noon EST

    Speaker: Mary M. Glackin, Deputy Under Secretary for Operations, NOAA

    Powerpoint Slides (pdf format)

    Abstract: Deputy Under Secretary for Operations Mary Glackin will share ten stories from her tenure that demonstrate different aspects of "NOAA pride."

    Note: This seminar is the library's annual Holiday Brown Bag Seminar, also featuring music from the NOAA Holiday Band and Chorus at 11:30 and, of course, refreshments.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    A Sustainable Idea: Virginia Sea Grant's Seafood Education for the Culinary Community

    Date: Wednesday, December 14, 2011 at 12 noon EST

    Speaker: Vicki Clark, Marine and Seafood Education Specialist, Virginia Sea Grant

    Abstract: One of Sea Grant’s National Focus Areas is a "safe sustainable seafood supply." Seafood is central to the culture and economy of our coastal regions, and nowhere is this more apparent than in Virginia. Virginia Sea Grant has become well-known for its research, advisory work and education activities focusing on seafood resources. VASG educators began providing science-based seafood information to consumers and culinary professionals over 20 years ago, and the opportunities and needs in this area have never been greater. Currently there is an unprecedented interest in culinary careers, and chefs as well as consumers are looking for information on sustainable, locally sourced seafood. Ms. Clark will present an overview of VASG’s seafood education program, describing its evolution from an event-based design to its current integrated approach involving numerous industry, agency, and educational partners and target audiences. There will be recipes and fish stories too!

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Life Line for the Dead Zone: Nutrient Retention in the Atchafalaya Basin, LA

    Date: Thursday, December 15, 2011 at 12 noon EST

    Speaker: Amy Scaroni, National Sea Grant Office, Coordinator for Safe and Sustainable Seafood Supply and Healthy Coastal Ecosystems focus areas

    Abstract: The Mississippi and Atchafalaya rivers are the major sources of freshwater and nutrients to the Gulf of Mexico. Increased nutrient loads from these rivers exacerbate eutrophication in coastal receiving waters and contribute to the large area of hypoxia that develops seasonally in the Gulf. Levees along the Mississippi River have reduced contact between the river and the historic floodplain; this limits the ability of floodplain wetlands to naturally mitigate excess nutrients. However, the Atchafalaya River diverges from the Mississippi 217 km from the Gulf and enters a large river floodplain with a widely spaced levee system. This enhances the ability of the Atchafalaya River Basin to remove and sequester nutrients, potentially reducing downstream eutrophication. Overbank flow spreads river-water and sediment across the floodplain. Over time, sedimentation has filled in many of the open water areas on the floodplain, such that lakes are transitioning to baldcypress swamps and bottomland hardwood forests. These habitats differ in their available nutrient reservoirs and the rates at which they transform and store nutrients.

    We investigated the major retention and removal mechanisms for carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus in the three major habitat types of the Atchafalaya River Basin. These reservoirs include denitrification, sedimentation, and assimilation by aboveground biomass. Total retention and removal for the entire basin is on the order of 1,177,605 - 1,561,805 t C yr-1, 46,049 - 47,603 t N yr-1, and 20,040 - 20,175 t P yr-1. Rates varied by habitat, highlighting the need to consider habitat change when developing management strategies to improve water quality. Data from this study can be used to parameterize nutrient models for the Atchafalaya River Basin, as well as for river diversions and floodplains with similar habitat types.

    Note: This seminar is part of the 2011 Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Series

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    2012 Brown Bags

    Inspiring Innovation by Capitalizing Creativity

    Date: Tuesday, January 10, 2012 at 12 noon EST

    Speaker: Michael Osmond, Senior Program Officer, World Wildlife Fund

    Presentation Slides (pdf)

    Abstract: Bycatch is among the most problematic aspects of modern fishing from a conservation perspective. In addition to the sheer volume of bycatch globally, unselective fishing poses an extinction threat to numerous species of ocean wildlife and threatens the commercial viability of a number of mainstream fisheries. In recent years, improvements to fishing gear and practices have played an important role in reducing bycatch, as modifications have increased the chances for non-target species to escape or avoid capture altogether. In response to the bycatch concern, World Wildlife Fund (WWF) initiated the first International Smart Gear Competition in 2004-2005, with the goal of identifying innovative and practical modifications, to currently used gear with potential for significantly reducing bycatch. The competition, which now offers cash prizes totaling $57,500, has been held five times and attracted more than 330 entries from 50 countries worldwide. It has also served as a positive way for conservation interests to cooperate with industry and a cornerstone for cross-sector collaboration between NGOs, industry and government.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    How do catch shares affect marine resources? Insights from a global comparative analysis

    Date: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 at 12 noon EST

    Speaker: Dr. Tim Essington, Associate Professor, Aquatic & Fishery Sciences, University of Washington

    Research Papers:
    Ecological indicators display reduced variation in North American catch share fisheries: Summary, Research Paper
    Can catch share fisheries better track management targets? Summary, Research Paper

    Abstract: NOAA issued its Catch Share Policy in November 2010 to provide guidance and direction on these programs as fishery management tools to build and maintain sustainable and prosperous U.S. fisheries and healthy ocean ecosystems. Yet, we still don’t know the types of ecological benefits they provide to fisheries, and the types of fisheries where these benefits are most likely. Dr. Timothy Essington, Dr. Mike Melnychuk and their colleagues, supported by the Lenfest Ocean Program, conducted the most comprehensive study to date on the effectiveness of catch share programs in achieving fisheries management objectives, comparing the impacts of catch shares for 345 stocks around the world, including many U.S. stocks. The team was the first to discover that the most prominent effect of catch shares was more predictability and less variability in ecological metrics.

    Using statistical approaches to tease out the impacts of catch shares from other factors influencing fisheries health, the researchers found no evidence that catch share programs significantly improved the population size of the fish. They did find, however, that catch share programs often increased the predictability of hitting quota targets and can reduce the frequency of overfishing, making catch shares useful tools for better managing fisheries.

    The results of this body of research may help guide NOAA and the regional fishery management councils in decisions about new policies or management options for implementing catch share programs.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Do You Have a Flag? Arctic Governance and the perceived "race" for resources

    Date: Thursday, January 19, 2012 at 12 noon EST

    Speaker: Christina Hoefsmit, U.S. Coast Guard, Marine Transportation System Directorate

    Abstract: The Arctic’s extremes, both in climate and geography, have shielded it from many of the modern advances that have influenced much of the world. However, time is quickly catching up with the Arctic. Promising prospects and the decreasing extent of summer sea ice have heightened interest in Arctic offshore oil and gas resources, commercial shipping, tourism and other activities, providing new opportunities and a longer seasonal window. Increasing access and a changing geopolitical status has prompted some commentators to suggest a global "race" for Arctic resources and the need for a comprehensive Arctic treaty analogous to the Antarctic Treaty System that governs Antarctica. Despite the similarities that exist between Antarctica and the Arctic they are fundamentally distinct such that the application of governance mechanisms similar to Antarctica’s would be inappropriate. Rather than a global "race," current governance mechanisms, chiefly the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS), provides for the orderly resolution of most Arctic issues. In addition, several other international agreements and organizations exist to resolve issues not covered under UNCLOS. Consequently, a new comprehensive governance mechanism akin to the Antarctic Treaty System is unnecessary.

    Note: This seminar is part of the 2011 Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Series

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Danger, desire, and governance: a political ecology of Vibrio vulnificus

    Date: Thursday, January 19, 2012 at 12:30pm EST

    Speaker: Becky Blanchard, Office of Marine Conservation, Department of State

    Abstract: Oysters are often imbued with qualities of danger and desire. Yet these affective and sensory elements are increasingly imbricated with the technical and mundane: interstate commerce rules, laboratory testing, and food processing technologies. In 2009, the Food and Drug Administration proposed a ban on the sale of raw oysters harvested from the Gulf of Mexico from spring through fall. The proposal, which has led to dramatic changes in shellfish management and processing, was spurred by public health concerns related to Vibrio vulnificus, a bacterial pathogen that causes the deaths of approximately 15 U.S. consumers each year. This presentation is based on 14 months of ethnographic fieldwork in Apalachicola Bay, Florida, a community that produces 10% of the nation’s oysters. The proposed ban, and the measures that have been taken to prevent it, may have a particularly significant impact on oyster harvesters in Apalachicola Bay due to the historical effects of resource tenure regimes on local industry structure. Debates about food safety are also debates about society and governance. This presentation examines the discourses of risk and freedom underlying the controversy over V. vulnificus and its control, as well as implications for particular actors, livelihoods, identities, and ecologies.

    Note: This seminar is part of the 2011 Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Series

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Information management: the value of embedded librarians in NOAA programs

    Date: Tuesday, January 24, 2012 at 12 noon EST

    Speakers: Trevor Riley, NOAA PPI; Joan Moumbleaux, NMFS Habitat Restoration Division; and Chris Belter, NOAA Central Library

    Abstract: In today's information-rich environment, effectively managing information is critical to success. Embedded librarians and information professionals can assist in this process by creating information management solutions tailored to unique organizational needs. This seminar will present three case studies of how embedded librarians are already assisting NOAA program offices. Trevor Riley will discuss his work within the office of Program Planning and Integration, including the management of shared electronic workspaces, research, and development of new information architecture public websites. Joan Moumbleaux will discuss her information management work on the Deepwater Horizon Oil spill; specifically how she identified the Restoration Center’s business needs, determined information governance and management, and insures security in a litigation hold environment. Finally, Chris Belter will discuss his role in tracking, publicizing, and performing bibliometric analyses on publications supported by NOAA's Office of Ocean Exploration and Research in order to help demonstrate the Office's value to NOAA.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Regulating Carbon Emissions from Ships

    Date: Wednesday, January 25, 2012 at 12 noon EST

    Speaker: Bryan Wood-Thomas, Vice-President, World Shipping Council

    Presentation Slides

    Abstract: Please join us on Wednesday, January 25, 2012, from noon to 1:00 p.m. in the NOAA Central Library (SSMC3, 2nd Floor) for a brown bag presentation on regulating carbon emissions from ships. Bryan Wood-Thomas, Vice-President of the World Shipping Council and former Associate Director of EPA’s Office of Transportation and Air Quality, will address the current global debate on how to regulate carbon emissions from shipping with a focus on the primary options under debate, the economic motivation of the parties, and the political and legal questions that arise in certain scenarios. Bryan will also discuss the anticipated impacts of the North American Emission Control Area, an area designated by the International Maritime Organization in 2010 that encompasses coastal and ocean waters around North America out to 200 nautical miles. Beginning in August 2012, ships in this area must comply with more stringent air pollution limits for NOx, SO2 and particulate matter

    More information about the North American Emission Control Area can be found at http://www.epa.gov/otaq/regs/nonroad/marine/ci/420f10015.htm.

    Bryan Wood-Thomas’ bio can be found at http://www.worldshipping.org/about-the-council/council-management/bryan-wood-thomas.

    Note: This seminar is sponsored by the International Section of the NOAA General Counsel Office.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    A Dialogue with the NOAA Administrator on Future NOAA Science

    Date: Friday, January 27, 2012 at 12 noon EST

    Speaker: Dr. Jane Lubchenco, Under Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere and NOAA Administrator

    Presentation Slides (in pdf format)

    Abstract: Dr. Lubchenco invites all NOAA employees to participate in an open dialogue on future NOAA science. What should our research priorities be given ongoing fiscal challenges? How can we improve the climate for NOAA science? As we face increasingly challenging economic and social times, we must be selective and strategic in delivering the greatest value to the Nation. We also must communicate the merit of NOAA science effectively to decision makers and the public. Dr. Lubchenco will offer some thoughts on future NOAA science, including how we might better frame it for the public and decision makers. Please bring your ideas for future NOAA research priorities and ways we can strengthen the way we talk about and share our science with the world.

    Note: This seminar will take place in SSMC3, room 4527. This seminar celebrates the 500th Brown Bag Seminar given at the NOAA Central Library since the seminar series' inception in 1994.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    AAAS Fellowship Program and NOAA: Opportunities to Host a Fellow

    Date: Wednesday, February 1, 2012 at 12 noon EST

    Speakers: Current NOAA AAAS S&T Fellows and their mentors; AAAS staff

    Presentation Slides (in .pptx format)

    Abstract: American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Science & Technology Policy Fellows are competitively-selected, Ph.D. level scientists, social scientists, and engineers from a broad range of disciplines. These Fellows are available for placement in federal agencies for a 1-2 year term (renewal year can include details outside of the DC area). The Program, in existence since 1973, has an outstanding national reputation with many former Fellows occupying some of the highest positions in science policy throughout the federal government. AAAS currently partners with over 15 federal agencies, many Congressional offices and committees, and nearly 30 professional scientific societies to operate the Science & Technology Policy Fellowships.

    NOAA has hosted 12 AAAS Fellows since it began participating in the Fellowship Program in 2007. The Fellows offer scientific and technical expertise as they assist with projects, program management, or policy analysis. Fellows start work after two weeks of intense training in science policy (including ethics, the legislative process, and the budget process) and are supported throughout their two years with professional development activities. AAAS Fellows also serve as a link to a network of science and science policy professionals across academia and government, including a network of over 2,500 current and former Fellows.

    The recruitment process for 2012-2013 AAAS Fellows is already underway, and prospective host offices must act soon to participate. At this information session, current AAAS Fellows and AAAS program staff will share details about the program, insights about their experiences, upcoming deadlines in the recruitment process, and answer your questions. Because the renewal year of the Fellowship can include details outside of the DC area, regional offices and labs are encouraged to participate via webinar.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    How to Give a Truly Terrible Talk, Briefing, or Workshop: An Homage and Update

    Date: Tuesday, February 7, 2012 at 12 noon EST

    Speaker: Dwayne Meadows, Species of Concern National Program Coordinator, Office of Protected Resources, NMFS

    Presentation Slides (pdf format)

    Abstract: Do you want to learn how to give better talks and presentations? Impress leadership with your thoughts and ideas? But you find yourself bored by typical self-help manuals and presentations by droll experts? Do you forget all that sage advice when crunch time on your next presentation arrives? Then come hear Dwayne Meadows update of a classic tongue-in-cheek guide for giving better presentations and learn from the (mostly real) mistakes of others.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    International Programs and Legal Authorities of the Department of the Interior

    Date: Thursday, February 9, 2012 at 12 noon EST

    Speakers: David Downes, Assistant Director for Policy in DOI's Office of International Affairs; and a panel from DOI's Office of the Solicitor

    Presentation Slides (pdf format)

    Presentation Slides (pdf format)

    Presentation Slides (pdf format)

    Abstract: We will begin with an brief overview of DOI international programs ranging from migratory bird conservation to Earth observation, presented by David Downes, Assistant Director for Policy in DOI's Office of International Affairs. A panel from DOI's Office of the Solicitor will discuss legal issues relating to DOI international programs, with particular reference to marine issues and law of the sea. Speakers will include Michael Young, Assistant Solicitor for Fish and Wildlife; Maria Lurie from the Parks Branch; and Milo Mason from the Division of Mineral Resources.

    Additional information about DOI's Office of International Affairs is available at http://www.doi.gov/intl/index.cfm.

    Additional information about DOI's Office of the Solicitor is available at http://www.doi.gov/solicitor/index.html.

    Note: This seminar is sponsored by the International Section of the NOAA General Counsel Office.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    State Agency Engagement with Habitat Conservation

    Date: Thursday, February 16, 2012 at 12 noon EST

    Speaker: Ron Regan, Executive Director, Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies

    Presentation Slides (pdf format)

    Abstract: This seminar will focus on the work of state fish and wildlife agencies in habitat conservation through the lenses of the North American Model of Fish and Wildlife Conservation, the National Fish Habitat Partnership, and the work of the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies. Policy and state-federal partnership opportunities will be explored.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Exploring Social Media Tools: A Case Study of One Office's Journey to Implement a Blog

    Date: Tuesday, March 6, 2012 at 12 noon EST

    Speaker: Sara Eckert and Becky Wynne, Center for Coastal Monitoring and Assessment, NCCOS

    Presentation Slides (pdf format)

    How to Write a Blog (pdf format)

    Creating a Blog with Wordpress (pdf format)

    Abstract: NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS)/Center for Coastal Monitoring and Assessment (CCMA) is launching the NOAA Coastal Ocean Science (COS) Blog. The goal of this seminar is the talk about the process NCCOS underwent to review, select and execute a new social media tool to promote their active, ongoing research. This overview is intended to be a case study of one office's approach to the social media planning and implementation. This presentation will outline the process of developing a blog for your organization, including how NCCOS was able to work within the guidelines of social media activities within the context of a federal agency. Additionally, we hope to provide insights on using social media for the promotion of science, and some key questions each office should consider before embarking on this process.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    When Adults Read with Children, Everybody Wins!

    Date: Thursday, March 8, 2012 at 12 noon EST

    Speaker: Lyn McGann, Program Manager - Power Lunch

    Abstract: Everybody Wins! DC Power Lunch Program at Highland View Elementary School brings adults together with elementary school students, one to one, to read for pleasure and to share conversation. The program is not a tutoring model; adult Reading Mentors are trained to act as role models, using literature as a means of sharing thoughts, feelings and aspirations. Highland View has a small but fully engaged program that meets two days per week; more sessions will open as a greater number of Reading Mentors are brought on board.

    While there is no formalized tutoring, students strengthen their reading-related skills through practice in an environment of encouragement and enjoyment. While reading themselves or being read to by their adult partners, students are supported fully in their efforts to open a dialogue about the greater world glimpsed in the pages of shared literature. They learn to appreciate their abilities for what they are; they interact with a caring adult for an hour a week. Thus, trust and self-esteem are also bolstered by the program.

    The Power Lunch Program occurs during the student’s lunch and recess hour. It is a turnkey program, supremely simple for busy professionals to access. At program time, students are waiting in the reading space for the Reading Mentors to arrive; the program is staffed by a School Coordinator who is an employee of Everybody Wins! DC. The School Coordinator is charged with seamless operation of the program at the school site, and is supported by the Program Manager, who supervises the program, as well as by the administrative team in the Organization Office in D.C. The School Coordinator will communicate directly with Reading Mentors, and can help them with cancellations, reschedules, or program questions and issues.

    A broad array of books at all reading levels is available in the program, and reading pairs are encouraged to explore all kinds of subjects. Activities and events punctuate regular reading sessions, but the focus is the written word. Mentors can read solo with a child, or can decide to alternate reading responsibility with another mentor, reducing their obligation to once every other week.

    Prospective Reading Mentors can apply to the program via the organization’s website, http://www.everybodywinsdc.org, and will receive an email detailing student information, session day and time, and contact information for the program at the school site.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Regulating Ocean Acidification through International Law

    Date: Thursday, March 15, 2012 at 12 noon EDT

    Speaker: Mark Spalding, President, Ocean Foundation

    Abstract: Fundamental changes in sea water chemistry are occurring throughout our oceans. Serving as the world’s largest natural carbon sink, the ocean absorbs about a quarter of the CO2 released into the atmosphere each year. As carbon emissions increase, a greater amount of carbon dissolves in the ocean, altering the pH level and causing the ocean to be more acidic. This relatively sharp increase in acidity has significant implications for marine ecosystems and the human activities dependent upon such resources. Unfortunately, no specific international law targeting the regulation of ocean acidification exists today. This seminar will discuss the regulatory gaps and the possible application of extant legal tools to regulate the carbon emission behavior of key nations to address ocean acidification.

    Note: This seminar is sponsored by the International Section of the NOAA General Counsel Office.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Little Fish, Big Impact: Managing a Crucial Link in Ocean Ecosystems

    Date: Wednesday, April 4, 2012 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speaker: Ellen Pikitch, Executive Director of the Institute for Ocean Conservation Science and Professor at the Stony Brook University School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences

    Presentation Slides (pdf format)

    Abstract: Forage fish, or small schooling fish such as anchovies and sardines, play a critical role in the marine food web as prey for larger fish, seabirds, and marine mammals. Markets for fish meal and fish oil to support the growing aquaculture and farm animal industries have placed these species under increasing commercial pressure. The Lenfest Forage Fish Task Force was established to develop and recommend ecosystem-based standards for the sustainable management of forage fisheries.

    Thirteen preeminent scientists with expertise in a wide range of disciplines conducted a comprehensive examination of the science and management of forage fish populations. Their research explored whether conventional management of these species poses substantial risks of population crashes and contributes to declines of their predators. Ellen Pikitch, the Task Force Chairperson, will share key results from the report, which include specific management recommendations for forage fish species.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Designing Evaluations

    Date: Thursday, April 5, 2012 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speaker: Stephanie Shipman and Valerie Caracelli, Applied Research Methods Team, Government Accountability Office

    Presentation Slides (pdf format)

    Abstract: Dr. Stephanie Shipman and Dr. Valerie Caracelli of the Government Accountability Office (GAO) will discuss the recently released report, Designing Evaluations: 2012 Revision, (GAO-12-208G) (pdf) which will serve as a reference in GAO and federal agency evaluation offices. This revision reflects performance measurement and evaluation thinking and practice post-GPRA, and the expansion of program evaluation to the full range of federal programs and policies. The guide introduces key issues in planning evaluation studies of federal programs and describes a variety of evaluation designs for answering different types of questions about program performance - from examining the implementation of national programs to assessing the effectiveness of specific practices and interventions. The guide is a tool for planning useful evaluations and developing educated consumers of evaluation.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Current Legal and Policy Issues Related to Antarctic Diplomacy

    Date: Thursday, April 12, 2012 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speaker: Evan Bloom, US Department of State

    Presentation Slides (pdf format)

    Abstract: Mr. Bloom will speak on "Current Legal and Policy Issues Related to Antarctic Diplomacy" and provide an overview of the Antarctic Treaty system with a focus on topics such as establishment of marine protected areas in the Southern Ocean, regulation of tourism, and enforcement of environmental regulations, including liability rules.

    Note: This seminar is sponsored by the International Section of the NOAA General Counsel Office.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Flounder Stock Enhancement: Post-Release Performance and Assessment of Cage Conditioned Japanese Flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus, in Wakasa Bay, Japan

    Date: Thursday, April 19, 2012 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speaker: Michelle Walsh, NOAA NMFS Office of Sustainable Fisheries - Domestic Fisheries Division

    Presentation Slides (pdf format)

    Abstract: Conditioning is the process of providing individuals reared for stock enhancement with some degree of "natural" experience prior to release. Conditioning flatfish in predator-free cages may help adjustment to the wild. From 2008-2010, Obama Laboratory conducted pre-release, experimental cage conditioning for Japanese flounder in both the Takahama and Obama portions of Wakasa Bay, Japan. Recaptured fish were acquired through a cooperative effort between researchers and local fishermen. The objectives were to describe how characteristics of released flounder changed with cage exposure and to determine how recapture rates compared between conditioned and non-conditioned fish. Significantly more conditioned fish were recaptured than non-conditioned fish in Obama Bay in 2010 (p < 0.05). In 2008 and 2009, recapture rates of conditioned and non-conditioned flounder followed the same trend, although these were not significantly different. Laboratory experiments revealed that conditioned fish had significantly better burying abilities (p < 0.001) and enhanced feeding abilities compared to non-conditioned fish. This study is the first to examine flatfish conditioning strategies using market data and shows that cage conditioning can favorably alter the attributes and recapture rates of released fish.

    Note: This seminar is part of the 2012 Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar Series

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    By-catch in the Saginaw Bay, Lake Huron commercial trap net fishery

    Date: Thursday, April 19, 2012 at 12:30pm EDT

    Speaker: Eric MacMillan, NOAA NMFS Office of Habitat Conservation

    Presentation Slides (pdf format)

    Abstract: This study provides species-specific catch and baseline mortality estimates of non-target species (by-catch) for the Saginaw Bay, Lake Huron commercial trap net fishery. By-catch can represent a significant mortality source that is often unknown. By-catch and by-catch mortality rates in the Saginaw Bay commercial trap net fishery, which primarily targets lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis), yellow perch (Perca flavescens), and channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus), are currently unknown. From May through August 2010, we observed onboard commercial trap net vessels and took species-specific counts of by-catch and estimated initial bycatch mortality (i.e., morbid or floating fish). The high levels of walleye (Sander vitreus) catch and mortality observed within inner Saginaw Bay have not been previously documented in the Laurentian Great Lakes. Walleye by-catch averaged 127.3 individuals per trap net lift and 42% of those caught were morbid. The levels of lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) catch observed were within the range observed in previous studies, but mortality (percent) was higher than has been previously observed. Lake trout by-catch averaged 39.4 individuals per lift and 39.2% of those were morbid. Through the use of generalized linear models, this analysis also indicated factors that most influenced catch of non-target species including time of year and soak time (i.e., time interval between trap net lifts). Surface water temperature and trap net depth most influenced mortality. These results may inform fishers and fisheries managers and highlight the need for comprehensive by-catch monitoring throughout the Great Lakes.

    Note: This seminar is part of the 2012 Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar Series

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Taking the Pulse: A proposed framework for Assessing and Reporting on the Status and Trends in Ocean and Coastal Health in Canada

    Date: Friday, April 20, 2012 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speaker: Dr. Colleen Mercer Clarke, coastal ecologist and landscape architect, University of Ottawa

    Presentation slides (pdf)

    Abstract: For over 100 years governments, academia, industry and community-based organizations throughout the world have monitored oceanic and coastal environments by collecting and recording data on multiple biological, chemical and physical parameters. Yet despite advances in fisheries management, pollution abatement technologies, and the creation of marine protected areas, conditions in most of the world's oceans continue to decline, sometimes dramatically. In 2010, to tackle these complexities, and disparities, and to ensure that the knowledge gained from CHONe research was effectively applied to policy and decision-making, CHONe embarked on an initiative to develop a framework for oceans and coastal health for Canada. Efforts concentrated on the standardization of widely used, but too often ambiguous terminology, and on the identification and incorporation of useful approaches and tools derived from the efforts and experience of Canadian as well as international initiatives. The proposed Framework is a science-based approach to defining, monitoring, assessing, rating and reporting on the status and trends in ocean and coastal health in Canada.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Endangered Elkhorn Coral Population Dynamics and Predictions for Recovery

    Date: Thursday, May 3, 2012 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speaker: Tali Vardi, NOAA NMFS Office of Science and Technology

    Presentation slides (pdf)

    Abstract: Fossil data from multiple locations indicates that Atlantic elkhorn coral, Acropora palmata, formed shallow reefs throughout the Caribbean Sea since the Pleistocene. Beginning in the 1980s A. palmata has declined to a small fraction of its formerly vast extent throughout the region. In 2006, elkhorn coral was the first coral, along with its sister species, staghorn coral (Acropora cervicornis), to be included on the U.S. Endangered Species List. We used size-based matrix modeling to parameterize annual A. palmata population dynamics in Florida, over the course of one severe hurricane year (2005) and six calm years (2004, and 2006-2010), incorporating environmental stochasticity as inter-annual variability. We predicted that benthic cover would remain at current levels (4%) for the foreseeable future (until 2030) and beyond (until 2100), suggesting a lack of resilience following the 2005 hurricanes. Standard metrics for the quantification of number and size of individuals are essential to endangered species management. These usually straightforward tasks can be challenging for clonal, colonial organisms. Acropora palmata presents a particular challenge due to its plastic morphology and frequent fission. We quantified three-dimensional colony surface area (CSA), the most ecologically relevant measure of size, for 14 prototypically arborescent A. palmata colonies using three-dimensional digital imaging software. To relate CSA to simple field metrics, we compared log-likelihood values and determined that planar projection was the best predictor. The, tight, linear relationship between planar projection and CSA enables ecological rates, such as reef accretion and gamete production, to be calculated from field data. Finally, we expanded the matrix population model to compare population dynamics in several locations across the Caribbean. The general trend for Acropora palmata is further reductions in population size by 2030. The most striking difference we quantified was between Jamaica, where population size is projected to increase, and all other locations, where population size is projected to remain stable or decline. Density of a key herbivore, the sea urchin Diadema antillarum, was an order of magnitude greater in Jamaica than in any other location. These increases are occurring 30 years after a devastating die-off suggesting that herbivory by urchins may facilitate A. palmata recovery.

    Note: This seminar is part of the 2012 Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar Series

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Impacts of Karenia brevis Harmful Algal Blooms on Piscivorous Birds in Sarasota Bay, Florida

    Date: Thursday, May 3, 2012 at 12:30pm EDT

    Speaker: Deborah Fauquier, NOAA NMFS Office of Protected Resources, Marine Mammal Health and Stranding Program,

    Presentation slides (pdf)

    Abstract: Harmful algal blooms (HABs), especially those caused by the red tide organism, Karenia brevis, a dinoflagellate that produces brevetoxins, occur frequently along Florida’s west coast, causing episodes of high mortality in fish, sea turtles, birds, bottlenose dolphins and manatees. Although K. brevis blooms are known to cause episodes of mass mortality among marine vertebrates, it is not known whether this disturbance results in significant declines in bird populations or changes in community structure. This study investigated the extent that brevetoxicosis contributed to morbidity and mortality in stranded sea birds and we investigated the impact K. brevis blooms had on the local abundance and habitat use of piscivorous birds in the Sarasota Bay estuary. Blood or fecal samples were collected from debilitated birds on admission to a rehabilitation hospital from 4 February 2005 through 28 November 2006. Dead birds were necropsied and tissues collected for histopathology. A competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to detect brevetoxins was performed on all collected samples. For the field study, data were obtained by conducting boat-based seasonal surveys of birds, K. brevis cell counts, and water quality during red tide and non-red tide conditions. Summer and winter surveys were conducted in four habitats between 20 June 2006 and 2 September 2009. Periods of high K. brevis concentrations (>105 cell l-1) occurred during February to December 2005, summer 2006, and winter 2007. Testing of blood, biological fluids, and tissues for brevetoxin by ELISA found toxin present in 69% (n=95) of rehabilitating sea birds with the highest values reported in double-crested cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus). Among sea birds that died or were euthanized the highest brevetoxin concentrations were found in bile, stomach contents, and liver. Most dead birds had no significant pathologic findings at necropsy, thereby supporting brevetoxin-related mortality. In the field over 34,000 bird observations were obtained involving over 20 different species. The most abundant bird species were double-crested cormorants, laughing gulls (Larus atricilla), and brown pelicans (Pelecanus occidentalis). Overall bird densities were lower during red tide conditions than they were during non-red tide conditions. In particular, the abundance of double-crested cormorants decreased in all habitats during red tide conditions. In contrast, brown pelicans and laughing gulls increased in abundance in certain habitats during red tide conditions and rebounded to lower abundances by 2008. It is probable that cormorants are consuming different prey than pelicans and gulls and may be exposed to a higher dose of toxin leading to increased morbidity and mortality and lower abundances during red tide events.

    Note: This seminar is part of the 2012 Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar Series

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Sea Grant’s Army of Volunteers: Taking on Turtles and Other Hurdles

    Date: Friday, May 4, 2012 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speaker: Logan Respess, Associate Director of the Texas Sea Grant College Program

    Presentation slides (pdf)

    Abstract: Hurricane recovery, endangered species, harmful algal blooms, invasive species, habitat degradation - there is no shortage of critical issues facing our nation’s coasts. The sheer scope of these issues far surpasses NOAA Sea Grant’s capacity to respond to them with its human capital alone, so we developed and trained a corps of master volunteers to help. Individually, these dedicated people could achieve small successes, but as a group they have provided far-reaching education, outreach and service projects. Join us in learning about the extraordinary impacts these master volunteers provide and how NOAA Sea Grant "raises me to the power of we!"

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Physiological and Growth Response of a Polar Diatom to Shifts in Iron and Irradiance: Implications for biogeochemical cycles

    Date: Thursday, May 17, 2012 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speaker: Jennifer Bennet, NOAA OAR Ocean Acidification Program Office

    Presentation slides (pdf)

    Abstract: The Ross Sea, one of the most productive Southern Ocean regions, accounts for a substantial proportion of global primary production and is responsible for up to one fourth of the C02 export in this ocean. Both primary and export production in this region are thought to be mediated by the interaction of light and iron (Fe) bio-availability. Future climate change may produce significant changes in the mixing-irradiance regime, and in the supply of macro- and micro-nutrients, in the highly productive waters of the Antarctic continental shelf. In this context, there is a pressing need to understand the responses of the major groups of Antarctic phytoplankton to such environmental changes. The diatom Fragilariopsis cylindrus is a prolific species on the Antarctic shelf, inhabiting both sea-ice (low irradiance) and open-water (high irradiance) regimes. Laboratory culture experiments were performed to examine the growth and physiology of this diatom under nutrient-replete conditions at irradiances of 5-500 µE m-2 s-1, on both acute and long term timescales. These allowed the sub-optimal, optimal, and supra-optimal irradiance for growth (5, 100, and 500 µE m-2 s-1, respectively) to be assessed for this species, under which growth at varying Fe concentrations (0 - 1000nM Fe-EDTA) could then be examined. Cell number, biovolume, photosynthetic efficiency (Fv/Fm) and effective absorption cross section of PSII (SPSII), photosynthetic and photoprotective pigments, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and intracellular particulate dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSPP) were measured in these experiments. The results indicated that F. cylindrus maintained relatively high growth rates (µ= 0.1-0.4) over a wide range of irradiance levels under nutrient replete conditions, probably using various physiological mechanisms including xanthophyll cycling and decreasing effective absorption cross section at higher irradiance. These mechanisms were also employed during iron manipulation experiments at the various irradiances, accompanied by an approximate 25% decrease in growth rate (µ) values. DMSPP levels (up to 60 mM) may also be serving as an antioxidant free-radical scavenging pool under both iron and light stress, thereby preventing oxidative damage, within the photosynthetic apparatus. DMSP is readily converted to dimethyl sulfide (DMS) which serves as cloud condensation nuclei, contributing to the climate feedback loop. These higher than previously recorded intracellular DMSPP concentrations, in addition to the ability of F. cylindrus to grow at higher irradiances could have implications for regional carbon and sulfur cycles.

    Note: This seminar is part of the 2012 Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar Series

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Managing and Modeling Fisheries at Small Spatial Scales: A Case Study Using Giant Clams

    Date: Thursday, May 17, 2012 at 12:30pm EDT

    Speaker: Annie Yau, NOAA OAR Office of the Assistant Administrator

    Presentation slides (pdf)

    Abstract: Many marine populations are managed at small spatial scales (tens to hundreds of kms), as in the example of small-scale fisheries. A major difficulty in managing and modeling marine populations at small spatial scales is the unknown amount of self-recruitment occurring: larvae that settle within a small spatial area may have come from local adults (self-recruitment), or may be offspring of adults outside of the small spatial area (external recruitment). Without knowing where larvae are coming from, it is difficult to model patterns in population abundance. I modified an ecological population model (Integral Projection Model, IPM) to account for uncertainty in self-recruitment at small spatial scales, and used that model to determine that a small-scale fishery for giant clams in French Polynesia is sustainable at the present rate of fishing. I also determined a method for setting a minimum size limit that maximizes harvest while sustaining population abundance, despite uncertainty in self-recruitment. I generalized this method beyond giant clams to organisms with a variety of different life history characteristics. Overall, size limits can optimize (or nearly optimize) harvest in small-scale fisheries, and populations can be modeled and managed at small spatial scales in the face of uncertainty regarding the amount of self-recruitment.

    Note: This seminar is part of the 2012 Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar Series

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Ocean-related commitments at the Rio+20 Conference

    Date: Thursday, May 24, 2012 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speaker: Susan Lieberman, Deputy Director of International Policy, Pew Trusts

    Presentation slides (pdf)

    Abstract: In June 2012, governments will meet in Rio de Janeiro to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the 1992 Rio Conference (Rio+20). For this historic meeting, States have committed to secure renewed political commitment for sustainable development, assessing progress to date and remaining gaps in the implementation of the outcomes of major summits on sustainable development and addressing new and emerging challenges. As a result of advocacy by non-governmental organizations and some governments, the ocean is now one of the top Rio+20 priorities, and there are intense negotiations underway. Ms. Lieberman's talk will explore ocean-related commitments at previous global summits (Rio in 1992, Johannesburg in 2002), the gaps in implementation, and the potential for meaningful outcomes in Rio. The talk will also discuss efforts underway to address the conservation of high seas biodiversity and sustainable fisheries.

    Note: This seminar is sponsored by the NOAA Office of General Counsel- International Section

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Processing Large Data Streams Using Massive Online Collaboration

    Date: Tuesday, May 29, 2012 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speaker: Benjamin L. Richards, NMFS Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center

    Presentation slides (pdf)

    Abstract: NOAA's use of advanced sampling technologies has been increasing. While these advanced technologies promise to greatly enhance our ability to collect data, they present a variety of challenges given the shear volume of data they produce. On a recent two week survey mission by the Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center to American Samoa, an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle produced 52,000 benthic images and 42 and half hours of video footage. On the same mission, stationary remote camera stations recorded over 90 hours of video footage. Towed-Diver surveys routinely produce close 100,000 benthic images per year. How do we handle these data streams? Currently we make do by processing only a small subset of the available data or by allowing for long lag times between data collection and data processing. Work on computer algorithms that can automate certain portions of data processing is ongoing, but the human brain is still far superior for pattern recognition and processing visual data. Massive Online Collaboration, where image data is served to many independent volunteer human analysts through the internet, may be an answer. Massive online collaboration has already been used to digitize books, process Hubble deep field imagery as well as images from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, to transcribe weather logs from WW1 Royal Navy ships, as well as to process video data to understand the distribution of marine species and to increase our understanding of deep-sea ecosystems and how they change in response to human disturbance. If properly implemented, this tool can fulfill two key NOAA objectives: processing increasingly large optical data streams in a rapid and cost effective manner and education and outreach by involving the public in the processing of scientific information.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Spatial analysis of anthropogenic competition and overlap between critical sperm whale habitat in the Gulf of Mexico

    Date: Thursday, June 07, 2012 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speaker: Alyson Azzara, Committee on the Marine Transportation System

    Presentation slides (pdf)

    Abstract: The Gulf of Mexico is home to two of the world’s ten busiest ports by cargo volume, the Port of New Orleans and the Port of Houston; in 2008, these ports hosted a combined 14,000 ships. Past research shows that this increase in shipping worldwide has historically lead to an increase in ambient noise level of 3-5dB per decade. Sperm whales in the Gulf of Mexico are considered a genetically distinct, resident population. They have a preference for the Louisiana-Mississippi Shelf region which directly overlaps with the entrance to the Mississippi River and the Port of New Orleans. Disruptions from vessel noise could influence feeding and breeding patterns essential to the health of the stock. Historic sperm whale distribution data are combined with current distribution data to show continued habitat use on the scale of centuries. Automatic identification system (AIS) data overlain with this distribution data documents the bifurcation of key habitat for sperm whales along the Mississippi – Louisiana shelf by shipping lanes apparent through AIS ship track positions. Options for addressing this conflict are discussed.

    Note: This seminar is part of the 2012 Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar Series

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Evaluating Statistical Methods for Maximizing Classification: An Application using Otolith Tracers from Spotted Seatrout (Cynoscion nebulosus)

    Date: Thursday, June 07, 2012 at 12:30pm EDT

    Speaker: Stacy Beharry, National Science Foundation - Division Ocean Sciences

    Presentation slides (pdf)

    Abstract: Developing a classification model that accurately identifies the provenance of individuals is central in understanding the dynamics of any population. Otolith-derived tracers, such as trace element chemistry, stable isotope composition, and otolith microstructure have been widely used to determine origin, as each offer a unique habitat description. Despite widespread use, the statistical approaches to handle these data have been slow to develop, and limited guidelines are offered in choosing the most useful discriminatory variables collected from the otolith. Variables are frequently selected because they are easily obtained, widely used by other investigators, or because their mean concentrations differ among areas. These selection methods do not address the information conveyed by each variable, nor the overlap in information that may occur in variable combinations. In this study, Rao’s test for additional information was used to identify the most useful discriminatory variables for identifying the nursery seagrass habitats for spotted seatrout (Cynoscion nebulosus) in Chesapeake Bay. We found that all variables did not convey useful information and classification accuracy was heavily dependent on the type and number of variables used. Two variables from a suite of 12, barium and δ13C, conveyed sufficient information to classify fish with over 80% accuracy. By employing the correct statistical approaches, we show that classification success can be maximized, and natal origin of juvenile fish can be identified with greater accuracy.

    Note: This seminar is part of the 2012 Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar Series

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Development of an Integrated Benthic Ecosystem Survey

    Date: Wednesday, June 13, 2012 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speaker: Dvora Hart, NMFS Northeast Fisheries Science Center

    Presentation slides (pdf)

    Abstract: The NEFSC is transitioning its traditional dredge-based sea scallop survey into an integrated benthic ecosystem survey. Central to this transition is deployment of a towed camera system known as HabCam. The HabCam vehicle houses stereo digital still cameras with synchronized strobes, a synthetic aperture side-scan sonar, and an array of oceanographic instruments, including sensors for chlorophyll, dissolved oxygen, water color (spectra) and a CTD. Some dredge tows will continue to be performed, in order to ensure continuity of the time series and to obtain physical samples. A prototype HabCam survey of Georges Bank was conducted in 2011 that collected over 2.5 million images of the sea floor. HabCam will be deployed in both the Mid-Atlantic and Georges Bank starting in 2012. I will discuss results from the traditional dredge survey, the prototype 2011 HabCam survey and preliminary results from the 2012 surveys, and the insights they provide on sea scallop and benthic community dynamics.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    South-South Exchanges, Fishing Cooperatives, and Managing Fishery Resources for Multiple Industries: The Banco Chinchorro Perspective

    Date: Thursday, June 21, 2012 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speaker: Liam Carr, NOAA Office of Communications and External Affairs

    Presentation slides (pdf)

    Abstract: The Banco Chinchorro Biosphere Reserve is a 25-mile long coral atoll off the Yucatan Peninsula near the Belize border. Famed for its shipwrecks and scuba diving opportunities, the reserve also supports three Mexican fishing cooperatives, who are granted access in an agreement with local management authorities. Despite fishing and tourism interests, the nearshore ecosystem is under-studied and little knowledge exists on how local physical and geographic characteristics of the atoll system support reef life. In May 2012, researchers from Texas A&M University and COBI (Conservidad y Biodiversidad) trained local partners in low-cost reef and fish community assessment methods. This training and focused data collection increased the knowledge base of the Banco Chinchorro system while simultaneously strengthening collaborative partnerships between scientists and non-scientists.

    Note: This seminar is part of the 2012 Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar Series

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    When good intentions are not enough … marine protected areas in the Gulf of California

    Date: Thursday, June 21, 2012 at 12:30pm EDT

    Speaker: Alexis Rife, NOAA NMFS Office of International Affairs

    Abstract: Marine protected areas (MPAs) hold great potential to provide biological and socioeconomic benefits, but many have failed to fulfill these objectives. The rush to establish MPAs without proper resources does not resolve conservation problems, but creates a false sense of protection that may worsen the degradation of marine ecosystems at a regional scale. We reviewed MPA efficacy in the Gulf of California, Mexico in order to exemplify this phenomenon. We found that despite sufficient budgets, MPAs (with one exception) have not met conservation or sustainability goals. Here, I will examine two of these MPAs closely: Loreto Bay National Park (LBNP), a large, multi-use MPA where several types of small-scale commercial and recreational fishing are allowed, but where less than 1% of the park is totally protected from fishing and Cabo Pulmo National Park (CPNP), where the entire park has been closed to fishing by the local community. These examples allow us to conclude that MPAs have been unsuccessful due to insufficient no-take zones, little enforcement, and lack of good governance and community involvement. In order to fill these gaps and prevent continued degradation, we recommend a new philosophy for MPAs: no-take MPAs managed under co-management schemes with better intra-government cooperation, enhanced socioeconomic incentives, and improved enforcement.

    Note: This seminar is part of the 2012 Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar Series

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Japanese tsunami debris and invasive species - lessons learned in Oregon

    Date: Tuesday, July 10, 2012 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speaker: Dr. Samuel Chan, Oregon Sea Grant, Oregon State University

    Presentation Slides

    Abstract: The devastating 9.0 earthquake and resulting tsunami that struck Japan on March 11, 2011 claimed nearly 16,000 lives, injured 6,000, destroyed or damaged infrastructure and caused between $195-$310 billion in damages. It also released a pulse of debris estimated to be over 5 million tons, of which approximately 30% (~1.5million tons) is likely to still be afloat. As of June 2012, the floating debris, predicted to begin arriving with the Fall 2012 storms, has begun to come ashore on the west coast of North America, with a large ~165 ton floating dock appearing on Agate beach in Newport on June 5. The dock and its fouling community garnered extensive media coverage, and turned international attention to Oregon as a site of tsunami debris research and management. The threat of invasive species attached to tsunami marine debris is a critical and unforeseen risk that emerged with the beaching of the 66’ long dock that drifted from Japan. Dr. Chan will discuss the response and management of the risk of invasive species introduction in Oregon, and lessons learned from the beaching of the dock on Agate Beach.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Governance in West African Fisheries

    Date: Wednesday, July 11, 2012 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speaker: John Virdin, Senior Natural Resource Management Specialist, World Bank

    Presentation Slides (pdf)

    Abstract: The West Africa Regional Fisheries Program is a regional program of nine coastal countries from Mauritania to Ghana, financed by the World Bank and Global Environment Facility, aiming to sustainably increase the economic benefits generated by the marine fisheries for the region. The program includes three main components: (i) strengthening governance of the fisheries, (ii) reducing illegal fishing and (iii) increasing local value added from the fisheries. To date, 6 countries have joined the program, for a total investment of some $125 million over 5 years (Cape Verde, Ghana, Guinea-Bissau, Senegal, and Sierra Leone). Mr. Virdin’s talk will focus on results and lessons learned to date in Liberia and Sierra Leone, two of the first countries to join the program. The talk will, in particular, highlight some of the key policy, institutional and legal challenges in reforming governance and fisheries management of these fisheries.

    Note: This seminar is sponsored by the NOAA Office of General Counsel- International Section

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Flying with Albatross: What Black-footed Albatross are teaching us about the ocean

    Date: Thursday, July 19, 2012 at 12:00pm EDT

    Presentation Slides (pdf)

    Speaker: Pam Michael, NOAA NESDIS National Oceanographic Data Center

    Abstract: The advent of satellite tagging in the late 1990s has provided novel insights into the movements and habitat use patterns of North Pacific Albatrosses, which has greatly informed resource managers and stimulated ocean stewardship. This research has revealed that these far-ranging seabirds range across the entire North Pacific Ocean, crossing international boundaries and venturing into marine protected areas in U.S. territorial waters. In particular, investigating albatross movements at sea has advanced our understanding of 'hotspots' within NOAA National Marine Sanctuaries and Marine National Monuments. Studying their diets has raised the alarm about the pervasive occurrence of plastics in the marine food web. NOAA and Oikonos are incorporating these research findings into outreach and educational products through the eyes of albatross. New classroom lessons will provide a rich resource for educators to teach STEM topics, promote ocean stewardship, and inspire tomorrow's scientists, artists, engineers, and resource managers.

    Note: This seminar is part of the 2012 Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar Series

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Evolution of a latitudinal body size pattern in a marine isopod

    Date: Thursday, July 19, 2012 at 12:30pm EDT

    Speaker: Anna Manyak, NOAA NOS Marine Debris Program

    Presentation Slides (pdf)

    Abstract: Organismal body size strongly affects individual fitness, with larger body sizes generally being positively correlated to mating success and fecundity. It has been widely observed that organisms from higher latitudes tend to be larger than their lower latitude counterparts (termed Bergmann’s Rule). For most body size patterns, however, it remains unclear whether this reflects a genetic or phenotypically-plastic response, and what co-grading environmental variable(s) maintain the pattern. In order to answer some of these questions, I examined the marine isopod Idotea balthica, whose populations along the East Coast of the United States conform to Bergmann's rule. Using lab- and field-based experiments, I explored the evolutionary mechanism for the pattern, as well as co-grading environmental variables, namely temperature and predation, that may have led to the observed pattern. In this presentation, I outline the results of these experiments, showing that the body size pattern is adaptive and both predation risk and temperature may be important evolutionary forces in its development.

    Note: This seminar is part of the 2012 Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar Series

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    RipCur: Smartphone App for Rip Current Reporting

    Date: Thursday, July 26, 2012 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speaker: Dr. Jon Miller, Coastal Processes Specialist at New Jersey Sea Grant and Research Assistant Professor at Stevens Institute of Technology

    Presentation Slides (pdf)

    Abstract: The RipCur smartphone app was developed by a group of computer science senior design students at Stevens Institute of Technology. The project was guided by researchers at Stevens, the NJ Sea Grant coastal processes specialist, National Weather Service personnel, and former lifeguards enrolled at Stevens. The app provides a way for lifeguards to communicate with one another in real-time and to relay that information to interested parties including the NWS, and the US Coast Guard. Access to the app is restricted via a username and password and is not intended for distribution to the public. Authorized lifeguards simply identify a rip and input a few details and the app does the rest. The cell phone’s GPS is used to locate the rip, and the app automatically queries nearby buoys and tide gauges to obtain auxiliary information. Once input, the rip becomes a part of the active dataset and is viewable either in a list format or on a map by other lifeguards and researchers. The data also populates a database which is fully searchable. This allows lifeguard administrators and researchers the ability to identify the rips occurring at specific times or during specific conditions. The pilot version is currently being used by about a dozen beach patrols in New Jersey; however interest in the app has come from as far away as Israel and Australia.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    How NESDIS Contributes to NOAA's Strategic Goals

    Date: Thursday, August 2, 2012 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speaker: Mary Kicza, NOAA Assistant Administrator for Satellite and Information Services

    Presentation Slides (pdf)

    Abstract: NESDIS satellite observations and data center products and services are the foundation of a large number of NOAA's key mission offerings. NESDIS Assistant Administrator Mary Kicza will outline how NESDIS supports the activities of each NOAA line office, and supports the goals of NOAA's Next Generation Strategic Plan.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    The use of autonomous underwater vehicles in studies of mesophotic and deep water corals

    Date: Thursday, August 9, 2012 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speaker: Roy A. Armstrong, NCAS, University of Puerto Rico at Mayaguez

    Presentation Slides (pdf)

    Abstract: Recent studies on mesophotic coral ecosystems (30-150 m) throughout the US Caribbean describe, for the first time, abundant and structurally complex coral reefs on low-gradient platforms. Information on deep coral ecosystems (>150 m depth) in this region is even more scarce and largely limited to taxonomic listings from incidental collections by coral entanglement devices. The Seabed autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV), which was designed for high-resolution underwater optical and acoustic imaging, has provided unprecedented information on the distribution, community structure, and status of mesophotic reefs throughout the U.S. Caribbean. Preliminary surveys of deep coral ecosystems off western Puerto Rico show diverse azooxanthellate coral and invertebrate fauna at depths of over 200 m. For both mesophotic and deep coral ecosystems, the AUV benthic assessments can provide the required qualitative and quantitative data for selecting unique areas of high biodiversity and structural complexity for habitat protection and ecosystem based management.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Heat Transport and Dynamics of Past Climates

    Date: Wednesday, August 15, 2012 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speaker: Fern Gibbons, US Senate Commerce Committee

    Presentation Slides (pdf)

    Abstract: Studying past oceanic conditions can give us insight into global climate dynamics. Records of direct temperature measurement often only span the last 150 years; in many cases they are much shorter. Proxies are measurements that allow us to infer climatic conditions, and thus can be used to supplement and extend climate records. 20,000 years ago massive ice sheets covered large portions of North America and Western Europe. The transition from that glacial climate to our modern conditions was not a continuous warming. There were several abrupt coolings that interrupted the warming trend. Our proxy reconstructions suggest that oceanic and atmospheric circulations were different during abrupt coolings than they were during either glacial conditions or during the modern. During the abrupt coolings the oceans likely transferred less heat to the northern latitudes, while the atmosphere transferred more. This switch displaced the major tropical rain belts and caused widespread drought along the equator, demonstrating that tropical rainfall amount and patterns can be extremely sensitive to temperature changes.

    Note: This seminar is part of the 2012 Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar Series

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    The Effects of Life History Strategy and Uncertainty on a Probability-Based Approach to Managing the Risk of Overfishing

    Date: Wednesday, August 15, 2012 at 12:30pm EDT

    Speaker: Emily Susko, National Sea Grant Office

    Abstract: Recent U.S. legislation applies a precautionary approach to setting catch regulations in federal fisheries management. A transparent approach to compliance proposes that managers choose an allowable risk of overfishing, P*, which specifies the probability that scientists’ catch recommendation exceeds the true value of the overfishing limit (OFL). This approach aims to manage the risk of overfishing explicitly, but a chosen "allowable risk" does not alone provide sufficient information on the real risks associated with the resulting control rule. Rather, the ramifications of selected allowable risk levels depend on the amount of uncertainty in the stock assessment and on the life history of the species in question. To evaluate the risks associated with P*-based rules, my study simulated fishing three example species under three levels of uncertainty.

    Note: This seminar is part of the 2012 Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar Series

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Impacts of student research: What I gained from my work at NOAA

    Date: Thursday, August 16, 2012 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speaker: Heather Eberhart, 2010 Recipient of the NOAA Award at the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair

    Presentation Slides (pdf)

    Abstract: Research is often touted as a quintessential part of the college experience. My research began well before college, culminating in the Design and Development of a Portable Light Trap for Sampling Brachyuran Crab Larvae, which I entered in the 2010 Intel International Science and Engineering Fair. Selected as the winner of "The Pulse of the Planet" award given by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), I earned a fully-paid internship at one of NOAA’s facilities during the summer of 2012. Based on my career and professional goals, I elected to take an assignment with the Center for Oceanographic Products and Services’ Ocean System Test and Evaluation Program (OSTEP), which is comprised of a small group of physical scientists and marine technicians focused on research, development, and testing of new and improved oceanographic and meteorological measurement systems. While in OSTEP, my research was extremely varied. Time was spent testing and evaluating ultrasonic wind sensors, plotting and analyzing current data to assist with field test planning for a new Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP), assisting with preparation for lab testing with new microwave radar water level sensors, and processing environmental data from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Field Research Facility at Duck, NC to assist with field test planning for visibility and microwave radar level sensors. During this seminar, my various research projects will be discussed in further detail and ultimately I will consider how each impacted my career plans and interests.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    E-reader Access: Making NOAA Technical Memoranda Available on Mobile Devices

    Date: Friday, August 17, 2012 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speaker: Rachelle Jacobson and Rebecca Wynne, NOAA Center for Coastal Monitoring and Assessment (CCMA)

    Presentation Slides (pdf)

    Abstract: Currently, CCMA technical memoranda are usually available as PDFs through a few NCCOS Center webpages, including project pages. In this technology age, more and more people are relying on E-readers to view publications of all types. This presentation will provide an overview of the process NCCOS used to provide the Public access to its science and research technical memoranda through some E-reader platforms on the market.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Performance Measurement and Program Evaluation: What’s the Difference?

    Date: Thursday, August 23, 2012 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speakers: John Bortniak (NMFS OMB), John Baek (NOAA Office of Education), and Laurie Eckstrand (NOAA PPI)

    Presentation Slides (pdf)

    Transcript (Word document)

    Download Audio (mp3 format)

    Download Audio (WMA format). Download free Windows Media Player

    Abstract: Performance measurement and program evaluation are related but distinct aspects of performance management. This Brown Bag discussion will define them, and focus on similarities, differences, and how they relate to each other. Although the presenters will use a brief power point presentation to focus the discussion, the emphasis will be on an interactive session to address questions and comments from the audience.

    Note:This seminar is sponsored by the NOAA Evaluation Committee.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Climate and Earth System Science: Use-inspired Research and Advancing the Frontiers

    Date: Wednesday, August 29, 2012 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speaker: Venkatachala "Ram" Ramaswamy, Director, Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory

    Presentation slides (pdf)

    Abstract: Major advances have occurred in recent times in the global modeling of the Earth system, arising due to improved understanding of the fundamental governing processes and increased availability of high-performance supercomputing. These have enabled models to be developed with (a) more realism yielding, in turn, significant progress in climate and Earth system science, and (b) enhanced spatial resolution for deriving regional-scale climate information. Examples of this will be presented using the NOAA/ GFDL global model simulation results submitted to the World Climate Research Program’s Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) and the IPCC Fifth Assessment (AR5), with emphasis on atmospheric chemistry-climate interactions, biogeochemistry-climate interactions, and study of extremes and decadal predictability. NOAA/ GFDL’s future plans are focused on advancing the state-of-the-art modeling of the climate and Earth system with greater spatial resolution and accuracy, underpinned by the increased scientific understanding of the controlling mechanisms, better characterization of uncertainties, and a balanced assessment of the strengths/ limitations in projections and predictions.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Federal Employees' Group Life Insurance (FEGLI) Options

    Date: Wednesday, September 5, 2012 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speaker: Brian Sigwart, ChFEBC, Financial Advisor Representative, Metlife

    Abstract: The Federal Government Life Insurance Seminar explains the different Life Insurance options for Employees of the Federal Government. It explores how it works, what the benefits are, how it compares to private insurance, and what happens when an employee retires or gains other employment. It breaks down FEGLI’s different options as a current employee and the conversion options available. As a Chartered Federal Employee benefits Consultant (ChFEBCSM) Designee, Brian Sigwart has the skills needed to adequately address the unique financial needs of Federal Government Employees. He will describe the interworkings of the Life Insurance provided through the Federal Government and answer any questions attendees have specific to their individual policies.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Department of Energy Water Power Program Resource Assessments and Wave and Tidal Technologies

    Date: Thursday, September 6, 2012 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speaker: Brooke White, Wind and Water Power Program, US Department of Energy

    Presentation Slides (pdf format)

    Abstract: The Wind and Water Power Program is invested in comprehensive analysis of wind and water energy potential for future electricity production. In early 2012, the Water Power Program released reports that assess the total technically recoverable energy available in the nation's waves, tidal streams, and non-powered dams. The program plans to release additional program-funded assessments of ocean current and ocean thermal resources in addition to conventional and hydrokinetic terrestrial hydropower resources in 2012 and 2013. A variety of technologies are being developed to harness these ocean energy resources. Unlike wind power, where technology has largely settled on a single basic design, there are a variety of wave and tidal energy converter designs. For wave energy this includes attenuators, overtopping, oscillating water column, oscillating wave surge converter, and point absorbers. Tidal technologies include horizontal axis turbines, vertical axis turbines and oscillating hydrofoils.

    Note: This seminar is part of the 2012 Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar Series

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Removing Market Barriers for Marine Renewable Energy

    Date: Thursday, September 6, 2012 at 12:30pm EDT

    Speaker: Meghan Massaua, Wind and Water Power Program, US Department of Energy

    Presentation Slides (pdf format)

    Abstract: Marine renewable energy holds great potential in both the U.S. and abroad as a source of non-carbon emitting renewable energy located near areas of high population load. Within the United States, a variety of marine renewable energy resources can be harnessed, and energy potential is great. However, to date, no offshore wind farms have been constructed in the U.S. and marine and hydrokinetic deployments have largely been at the pilot or demonstration scale. The Wind and Water Power Program’s market acceleration and deployment programs focus on removing barriers to the advancement of marine renewable energy. One such barrier is the complex regulatory pathways involving multiple jurisdictions and statutory and regulatory authorities. For instance, deployment within a single leasing block may trigger numerous Federal statutes, State statutes, consideration of Tribal Usual and Accustomed Areas and rights, and a multitude of regulatory processes. Another barrier includes the uncertainty surrounding environmental impacts associated with marine renewables in the U.S. Finally, planning for multiple uses in our oceans and Great Lakes presents both a challenge and an opportunity for the marine renewable industry to site projects in a complex seascape. I will present some of DOE’s recent work addressing these issues.

    Note: This seminar is part of the 2012 Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar Series

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Coastal Blue Carbon briefing by Restore America’s Estuaries

    Date: Monday, September 17, 2012 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speaker: Steve Emmett-Mattox, Restore America's Estuaries

    Abstract: Coastal Blue Carbon refers to the concept that coastal marine ecosystems such as sea grass, salt marsh, and mangroves are significant carbon stores and contribute to ongoing reductions of atmospheric carbon through sequestration. There are opportunities through market and policy mechanisms to utilize coastal blue carbon as a tool for simultaneously achieving estuary restoration/protection goals and climate mitigation/adaptation goals. Restore America’s Estuaries has been at the forefront of advancing coastal blue carbon policies and tools in the U.S. and will provide information about the potential carbon values of these coastal wetland systems and progress toward linking wetlands carbon with restoration and protection.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Building Capacity to Measure, Analyze, and Evaluate Government Performance

    Date: Wednesday, September 19, 2012 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speaker: Kathy Newcomer, George Washington University

    Presentation Slides

    Abstract: Dr. Newcomer will discuss the need to view program evaluation and performance measurement not as separate functions but as a synergistic whole. This holistic view of performance management can increase the benefits from application of professional evaluation skills and standards to performance measurement practice, and can increase the capacity for evaluation that leads to organizational learning. She will discuss a number of steps that organizations can take to both enhance learning and improve performance through evaluation.

    Note: This seminar is sponsored by the NOAA Evaluation Committee

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Diversity of the Microbes Associated with Lophelia pertusa, a Cold-Water Coral

    Date: Thursday, September 20, 2012 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speaker: Julie Galkiewicz, NOAA OAR Communications Office

    Presentation Slides

    Abstract: Cold-water corals such as Lophelia pertusa are centers of biodiversity in the deep sea, providing habitat for hundreds of marine species and acting as nurseries for commercially important fish. Because these corals lack the symbiotic algae typical of many shallow-water corals, it is hypothesized that the microbial community associated with the coral may play an important role in nutrient cycling. A combination of culture work and molecular methods were used to examine these microbes, which include bacteria, archaea, fungi and other microeukaryotes. Samples of the coral were collected throughout the Gulf of Mexico and western Atlantic at depth via submersible and remotely-operated vehicles (ROVs). The diversity of microbes was investigated with a variety of methods, including culturing, 16S PCR, and metagenomics. The combination of abroad suite of methods ensured a more comprehensive view of the total diversity of the coral-associated microbes, which were found to include fungi, viral-like sequences, and dominated by the bacterial phyla Firmicutes, Alphaproteobacteria,and Gammaproteobacteria.

    Note: This seminar is part of the 2012 Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar Series

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Evaluating vessel traffic in the US high Arctic: Patterns from current and historic vessel position data

    Date: Thursday, September 20, 2012 at 12:30pm EDT

    Speaker: Alyson Azzara, NOAA Committee on Marine Transportation Systems

    Presentation Slides (pdf format)

    Video Barrow Ice Coverage (avi format)

    Abstract: Although the U.S. is an Arctic nation, there is little historic data on the number of vessels transiting the North Slope. Thus, it is very difficult to determine where infrastructure development and support is most needed in order to prioritize projects. Additionally, there is little data available on the diversity of vessels in the high Arctic. In order to better understand what infrastructure is needed to best support ongoing activities in the Arctic it is necessary to determine what types of vessels are using the Arctic. Current and established uses of the North Slope include seismic exploration, commercial vessels for supply delivery, Coast Guard vessels and ice breakers for support of transiting vessels. The data presented provide a snapshot into vessel presence in the Arctic and indications of traffic patterns. By combining historic vessel sighting data from NOAA’s National Marine Mammal Lab aerial surveys, recent AIS ship position data, and Satellite ice coverage data, it is possible to resolve emerging vessel use patterns in the Arctic based on ice retreat cycles and start to plan for a future where the complexity of activities occurring in such harsh conditions requires a new type of physical and informational infrastructure.

    Note: This seminar is part of the 2012 Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar Series

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Ocean Outcomes of Rio+20

    Date: Tuesday, September 25, 2012 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speakers: Kenli Schaaf, Office of Ocean and Polar Affairs, US Department of State; and Allison Reed, NOAA Office of International Affairs

    Abstract: Please join us for a brown bag presentation on the ocean outcomes of the Rio+20 United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development. Kenli Schaaf of the Department of State’s Office of Ocean and Polar Affairs and Allison Reed of NOAA's Office of International Affairs, who both attended the Rio+20 meeting as members of the U.S. delegation, will discuss the negotiating process, the oceans text in the outcome document (The Future We Want), how the oceans outcomes relate to U.S. priorities, and what’s next.

    Note: This seminar is sponsored by the International Section of the NOAA General Counsel Office.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Using underwater video for assessing abundance and behavior of black sea bass and seafloor habitats

    Date: Wednesday, September 26, 2012 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speaker: Bradley G. Stevens, NOAA EPP Living Marine Resources Cooperative Science Center

    Presentation Slides (pdf format)

    Abstract: Trawl surveys have been used to assess marine resources for many years, but they cannot be used in areas of heterogeneous habitats such as reefs and rock outcrops. Black sea bass (BSB) are common inhabitants of such areas on the continental shelf, and for this reason NOAA trawl surveys cannot adequately assess their abundance. We are developing new methods for in-situ assessment of BSB, their behavior, and habitats using video. In 2011, video surveys were conducted using modified commercial traps with multiple video cameras attached. Sampling consisted of two one-hour sets with bait (squid) and two without bait on 11 days at six sites off coast of Ocean City, MD. Fish were counted in video frames sampled at 30 sec intervals and the mean number per frame was calculated and compared between sets. Fish were more abundant at sites with heterogeneous habitats, and more fish were seen at baited than at unbaited traps. Proportions of approaching fish that were caught in traps were similar in the ocean (1.4%) and in the large mesocosm tank (3.1%) at the NMFS Sandy Hook Lab. In 2012 we used a stand-alone video camera platform at two sites, and sampled fish simultaneously with timed rod-and-reel fishing. Preliminary data indicates that R&R surveys can detect significant differences in abundance even with only 60% of the data analyzed. Future studies will compare video counts of fish to commercial trap catches. Surveys of seafloor habitats using a towed video camera sled are being conducted preliminary to leasing of offshore sites for windpower generation; these show that heterogeneous habitat is a small portion of overall seafloor which mostly consists of sand and sand-shell regions.

    Work supported by NOAA Office of Education, Educational partnership Program Awards # NA06OAR4810163; NA11SEC4810002; and camera sled studies were supported with funding from MD-DNR with BOEM.

    Note: This seminar is part of the 2012 NOAA EPP Cooperative Science Center Seminar Series

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Oysters’ Contribution to Water Column Filtration

    Date: Thursday, October 4, 2012 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speaker: Kristen Jabanoski, NOAA OAR Congressional Analysis and Relations Division

    Presentation Slides (pdf format)

    Abstract: Benthic suspension feeders such as oysters can have a significant impact on marine ecosystems through removal of particulate matter from the water column. Oysters are considered an important control on phytoplankton growth in estuaries because they feed primarily on phytoplankton and tend to form dense reefs. The substantial decline in the Chesapeake Bay’s oyster populations during the past century has been implicated in the eutrophication and overgrowth of phytoplankton in that ecosystem. Ostrea equestris (Say 1834), known commonly as the crested oyster, is a non-reef building and noncommercial species which co-occurs in the Carolinas with the commercially-harvested and well-studied Eastern Oyster, Crassostrea virginica. Once considered rare and cryptic, recent surveys have indicated that the crested oyster is much more common than previously known. To better understand the role of O. equestris in its ecosystem and its potential interactions with C. virginica, I completed a novel investigation on the scaling relationship between biomass and filtration rates for O. equestris, as well as how environmental factors such as flow speed and concentration of phytoplankton affect filtration. I found that O. equestris’ filtration rates per unit biomass were about thirty times lower than C. virginica, and that they filter most efficiently at moderate flow speeds (10 cm/s). The results indicate that O. equestris does not have nearly the same filtering capacity as C. virginica, but responds similarly to environmental factors.

    Note: This seminar is part of the 2012 Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar Series

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Anaerobic Oxidation of Methane in Freshwater Wetland Ecosystems

    Date: Thursday, October 4, 2012 at 12:30pm EDT

    Speaker: Kate Segarra, Office of the Oceanographer of the Navy

    Abstract: Freshwater wetlands are characterized by high rates of methanogenesis and are the single largest source of atmospheric methane. Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM), a previously underappreciated process in these systems, may be an important component in freshwater methane budgets. Here we report some of the first direct measurements of AOM in wetland sediments. We examined seasonal methane cycling within three freshwater wetlands (two peat wetlands and one tidal, freshwater creekbank) along the eastern coast of the US. Rates of AOM were high (up to 286 nmol cm-3d-1) and varied on a seasonal basis. Despite low sulfate concentrations, rates of sulfate reduction were sufficient to support all the observed AOM activity, though rates of these two processes were not correlated. The zone of AOM activity was marked by enriched stable carbon isotopic signatures (δ13C) of methane and depleted signatures of DIC. However, the δ13C of archaeal and bacterial lipids were not indicative of methanotrophy. Studies that evaluate the role of AOM in wetlands using lipid and isotope-based approaches may therefore underestimate its importance. This study highlights the importance of AOM in freshwater sediments, where this process may control emissions of methane to the atmosphere. Both SR and AOM may effectively limit the methane emissions from these wetlands through competitive interactions with methanogens and the consumption of large fractions of the methane produced from acetate and hydrogen.

    Note: This seminar is part of the 2012 Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar Series

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    What pirates can teach us about integrated decision support

    Date: Friday, October 5, 2012 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speaker: Dr. David Titley, Deputy Under Secretary for Operations, NOAA

    Presentation Slides (pdf format)

    Abstract: Please join us for a brown bag presentation by our Deputy Under Secretary for Operations, Dr. David W. Titley. Dr. Titley recently joined NOAA from the US Navy, where he served as a naval officer for 32 years and rose to the rank of Rear Admiral. Dr. Titley’s career included duties as Oceanographer and Navigator of the Navy; director, Task Force Climate Change; and Assistant Chief of Naval Operations for Information Dominance. Dr. Titley will describe an application for forecasting encounters with modern day pirates off the coast of Somalia, and how we can make use of our environmental data to support operational decisions.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    The role of bibliometrics in evaluating scientific research

    Date: Wednesday, October 10, 2012 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speaker: Chris Belter, NOAA Central Library

    Presentation Slides (pdf format)

    Abstract: Bibliometric analysis is increasingly being used to evaluate the scientific research of authors, institutions, and countries. This increased use has unfortunately led to the misapplication of bibliometric indicators such as the Impact Factor and the H-Index, due primarily to a lack of understanding as to what these metrics actually measure. This session will provide a high-level overview of the types of questions that bibliometrics can and cannot answer, show how bibliometrics provides answers to these questions, and provide a recommendation of how bibliometric analysis can be combined with informed peer review to provide a more holistic evaluation of scientific research.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Spatial Planning and Bio-Economic Analysis for Offshore Shrimp Aquaculture in Mexico

    Date: Thursday, October 18, 2012 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speaker: Michaela Clemence, NOAA Office of the Under Secretary

    Presentation Slides (pdf format)

    Abstract: Global demand for shrimp is currently met with wild caught and farmed species, both of which are frequently environmentally and economically unsustainable. Offshore aquaculture is an emerging alternative that shows promise for reducing or eliminating many concerns embedded in existing capture fishery and land-based aquaculture practices. Aquapods are a new offshore aquaculture cage system that could provide a path to sustainable shrimp production, but little is known regarding optimal placement or economic viability of this new technology. This project uses an innovative spatial bio-economic analysis to provide a strategic framework for implementing offshore shrimp aquaculture with greater certainty of success. To better inform the planning, management and research priorities of Aquapod operations in Mexico, this project couples marine spatial planning with bio-economic modeling and sensitivity analyses to identify suitable sites for Aquapod implementation and evaluate the economic viability of Aquapod operations. Our model indicates that only a small proportion of our study areas are suitable for Aquapod implementation and that none of the potential locations are expected to be profitable. We found that profitability is driven by both spatial variability and operational decisions, and by locating Aquapods close to shore and reducing feed and labor costs, managers can help ensure the economic viability of Aquapod operations.

    Note: This seminar is part of the 2012 Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar Series

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Emerging Infectious Disease in Marine Mammals: Sentinels of Environmental Change

    Date: Thursday, October 18, 2012 at 12:30pm EDT

    Speaker: Deborah Fauquier, Marine Mammal Health and Stranding Program, Office of Protected Resources, NMFS

    Presentation Slides (pdf format)

    Abstract: In 1992, Title IV of the Marine Mammal Protection Act was amended to establish the Marine Mammal Health and Stranding Response Program (MMHSRP) which directs NOAA in consultation with the Department of the Interior, the Marine Mammal Commission and other experts to facilitate the collection and dissemination of reference data on the health of marine mammals and health trends of marine mammal populations in the wild; correlate the health of marine mammals and marine mammal populations, in the wild, with available data on physical, chemical, and biological environmental parameters; and coordinate effective responses to unusual mortality events. The MMHSRP has been operational for 20 years evaluating infectious disease, harmful algal bloom biotoxins, and chemical contaminants in marine mammals.

    Although multiple infectious diseases have been discovered in marine mammals since 1992, recent emerging marine mammal infectious diseases have been found along our coast including some with potential implications for human and marine mammal population health. In the late 2000s Cryptococcus gatti was isolated from stranded cetaceans along the Pacific Northwest. This increase in cases in porpoises coincided with increased disease in the human population, domestic animals and terrestrial wildlife. Current environmental conditions appear to support this pathogen becoming endemic along the Pacific Northwest coast. In early 2010 Coxiella burnetti was discovered at a high prevalence in northern fur seals in the Pribilof Islands and subsequent follow-up testing found increased levels of contamination at rookery sites. Recently in 2011, an outbreak of avian influenza (H3N8) was found to have caused mortality in stranded harbor seals along the Northeast coast. The seal virus contained mutations that have been shown to enable other flu viruses to more easily infect mammals and has raised concern over the threat posed by this virus to both animals and people. Additionally, over the last two years increased detection of marine brucellosis cases in stranded cetaceans across the United States has led to an increased effort to understand the potential impacts of this disease on animal and human health. Lastly, a recent unusual mortality event in Alaska involving ice seals and walrus has increased the need for collaborative research across countries, research disciplines, and the public health sector to address subsistence harvest issues related to emerging disease conditions in marine mammals.

    In addition to concerns about the health of marine mammal populations and the health of the ocean environment, public health issues over the risk of disease exposure to marine mammal workers or through food safety and security concerns have been raised in all of the above mentioned disease events. NOAA is working in collaboration with various branches of CDC, state public health, wildlife biologists and veterinarians, and other federal partners to increase our understanding of emerging diseases in marine mammals and the potential role of environmental change. Studies are underway to determine if the pathogens are changing, shifting geographic ranges, and/or hosts, or if the distribution or susceptibility of the animals has altered. However in ocean ecosystems which may be significantly impacted by environmental change and anthropogenic activities, it is essential that integrated wildlife disease surveillance and investigations continue with increased cooperation with the public health sector. Given the biology of marine mammals, their use as subsistence food, the land-sea connection, and the occurrence of shared pathogens, marine mammals may serve as excellent sentinels for early health warning systems on the impacts of climate change.

    Note: This seminar is part of the 2012 Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar Series

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    On the Verge: International Development of Deep Seabed Hard Minerals

    Date: Thursday, October 25, 2012 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speaker: Caitlyn Antrim, Executive Director, Rule of Law Committee for the Ocean

    Presentation Slides (pdf format)

    Abstract: The International Seabed Authority has approved 17 contracts for exploration of mineral deposits on the seabed beyond national jurisdiction, including with commercial firms from the United Kingdom and Belgium and organizations from Russia, China, India, South Korea and Japan. In spite of the interruption in the rising growth of demand for nickel, copper and other seabed metals during the "great recession," prospects are looking up for the deep seabed mining industry - at least for nationals of states parties to the Law of the Sea Convention.

    Caitlyn Antrim will give an overview of the technical, economic, market, legal and political factors that have led to the doubling of International Seabed Authority contracts in the past two years and the constraints on the sole remaining U.S. holder of NOAA licenses for commercial exploration of sites in the Pacific Ocean. Her presentation will include a status report on the International Seabed Authority as it begins to prepare rules and regulations for exploitation of seabed nodules, and the prospects for commercial development of deep seabed minerals inside and outside of the Law of the Sea Convention.

    Note: This seminar is sponsored by the International Section of the NOAA General Counsel Office.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    How to Write Great Performance Measures

    Date: Monday, November 5, 2012 at 12:00pm EST

    Speaker: John Bortniak, NMFS Office of Management and Budget

    Presentation Slides (pdf)

    Presentation Slides with speaker's comments (pdf)

    Transcript (Word document)

    Audio download (mp3)

    Abstract: As part of the continuing series presented by the NOAA SEE Evaluation Committee, John Bortniak will present this tutorial on writing performance measures. Topics to be addressed include the difference between milestones and measures, the components of a proper measure, types of measures, balancing the tradeoffs of using outputs and outcomes in your performance portfolio, introduction to the use of logic model to frame measures, trigger question to help develop measures, pitfalls to be avoided, the use of business rules for performance measures, and a quality checklist.

    Note: This seminar is sponsored by the NOAA Evaluation Committee

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Two Geodesic Missions to the Equator: 18th and 20th Centuries

    Date: Friday, November 9, 2012 at 12:00pm EST

    Speakers: Larrie D. Ferreiro, Director of Research, DAU Center for Defense Acquisition Research and Ernesto Capello, Associate Professor of History and Latin American Studies, Macalester College

    Part 1 abstract: In the early eighteenth century, at the peak of the Enlightenment, an unlikely team of European scientists and naval officers set out to the equator on the world's first international, cooperative scientific expedition, intent on resolving one of mankind's oldest mysteries: the true shape of the Earth. A nation that could accurately determine the planet's shape could securely navigate its oceans, giving it great military and imperial advantages. What seemed to be a straightforward scientific exercise was almost immediately marred by a series of unforeseen catastrophes, as the voyagers found their mission threatened by treacherous terrain, a deeply suspicious populace, and their own hubris.

    Part 2 abstract: In the midst of the acceleration of an international thrust toward ever more precise measurements of the shape of the Earth at the tail end of the nineteenth century, a call to resurvey the arc of the equatorial meridian emerged in geodesic circles. In 1898, the French Bureau des Longitudes, still smarting from the defeat of Paris as the global Prime Meridian the previous decade, offered to conduct the necessary surveys in commemoration of the Gallic role in the first great equatorial survey of the eighteenth century. A military mission subsequently returned to Ecuador between 1899 and 1906 and conducted geodesic, astronomical, meteorological, archaeological and anthropological studies of the Andean corridor previously explored by Enlightenment savants. Besides presenting an overview of these surveys, this presentation considers this expedition as a moment of scientific commemoration in which the politics of memory proved as integral as the measurements themselves. It explores just why the French returned to Ecuador instead of their colonial territory in Congo, why they took pains to build pyramidal monuments to celebrate their progress, why these continued following their departure from South America, and the means whereby the Ecuadorian intelligentsia and indigenous communities impacted these efforts as contributors, detractors, and challengers of the impartiality of science.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Overview of the Department of Commerce Performance Excellence Program

    Date: Wednesday, November 14, 2012 at 12:00pm EST

    Presentation Slides (pdf)

    Speaker: Christine Heflin, Department of Commerce

    Abstract: The presentation will describe this Department of Commerce (DOC) program and how it fits into government-wide efforts to improve operations. There will also be material on the basics of Balanced Scorecard systems and process improvement methods. Balanced Scorecards and process improvement are core elements of performance management at DOC.

    Note: This seminar is sponsored by the NOAA Evaluation Committee

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Global Surveillance for Pathogen Emergence in Marine and Terrestrial Wildlife

    Date: Tuesday, December 11, 2012 at 1:00pm EST

    Speakers: Jonna Mazet and Tracey Goldstein, One Health Institute and Wildlife Health Center, University of California, Davis

    Abstract: In order to predict, detect, respond to, and prevent the emergence of infectious diseases, we must identify them at their source. Rapid human population growth and environmental changes have resulted in increased numbers of people living in close contact with animals in altered habitats, disrupting the ecological balance between pathogens and their hosts. Our One Health approach targets important sentinel species at active wildlife-human interfaces in hotspot regions and integrates risk modeling, molecular diagnostics, and intensive field studies to detect novel diseases with pandemic potential early, giving wildlife and human health professionals and resource managers the best opportunity to prevent emergence or control epidemics early. We will discuss current evidence of shifting wildlife and human pathogen dynamics in conjunction with land use change and climate variability in marine and terrestrial systems and illustrate the emergence of a potentially devastating pathogen in the Northeast Pacific, an unforeseen effect of global warming on marine mammal biodiversity.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Offshore Oil and Gas Development in the Arctic

    Date: Wednesday, December 12, 2012 at 12:00pm EST

    Presentation slides (pdf)

    Speaker: Betsy Baker, Vermont Law School, and visiting scholar with the Extended Continental Shelf Task Force chaired by the State Department and co-chaired by NOAA and the Department of the Interior

    Abstract: In her presentation, Prof. Baker will address increased interest in offshore oil and gas development in the Arctic that has led to greater scrutiny of applicable domestic and international standards. The Law of the Sea Convention provides a basis for States to harmonize their respective domestic policies with regard to preventing, reducing and controlling pollution of the marine environment arising from or in connection with seabed activities subject to their jurisdiction. She will also discuss harmonization initiatives, post-Deepwater, that aim not for identical regulations but for sharing of information and best practices among regulators. At the international level, she will discuss the Arctic Ocean Review (AOR) of the PAME Working Group of the Arctic Council, which will be presented at the 2013 Arctic Council Ministerial Meeting. The AOR is a comprehensive survey of international instruments relevant to the marine Arctic. She will focus on its discussion of offshore resource development but touch on other sections of the AOR as well (fishing, shipping, ecosystem based management).

    Note: This seminar is sponsored by the International Section of the NOAA General Counsel Office.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    New Perspectives on an Ancient Species: studying the feeding ecology of the Atlantic Horseshoe Crab from the air and land.

    Date: Thursday, December 13, 2012 at 12:00pm EST

    Speaker: Wan-Jean Lee, National Sea Grant Office

    Abstract: The Atlantic Horseshoe Crab, Limulus polyphemus are well known for their spawning behavior, where large numbers aggregate along the high water mark. Concerns over sustainability of current levels of harvest of Limulus by the eel and whelk fisheries for bait and biomedical industries have resulted in increased efforts to understand the ecology of the species. The majority of on-going monitoring and management strategies focus on Limulus reproductive ecology and health of spawning habitat. There remains a lack of understanding of Limulus foraging ecology and habitats needed to support the trophic requirements of a population. I will discuss innovative aerial survey methods developed to examine the feeding ecology of Limulus in the Great Bay Estuary of New Hampshire, and new insights into Limulus ecology.

    Note: This seminar is part of the 2012 Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar Series

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Changing Bio-economic Conditions, Vessel Responses, and Financial Outcomes in the Federal Gulf of Mexico Shrimp Fishery; a 2006 through 2009 Comparison of Annual Vessel-Level Data

    Date: Thursday, December 13, 2012 at 12:30pm EST

    Speaker: Robert Jones, Office of Marine Conservation, US Department of State

    Abstract: An understanding of how federally-permitted Gulf shrimp vessels have responded to changes in three major bio-economic conditions—shrimp prices, fuel prices, and shrimp abundance—is poorly understood. This research uses three National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) self-reported datasets in order to develop an economic profile of a sample of active vessels in the federal fishery from 2006 to 2009. A financial accounting framework is used to generate vessel-level averages for these vessels. An index of bio-economic conditions (BECI) is developed to summarize and quantify the major exogenous impacts on the fishery. New results on fishing effort, labor and efficiency are generated, and changes in these results are explained in reference to the BECI. Results indicate that the BECI fluctuated substantially from 2006 to 2009, decreasing in 2007 and 2008 before rebounding in 2009. Changes in fishing effort, fuel, labor and fixed costs, show a recognizable relationship to changes in the BECI. The consistent reporting of net losses from operations by the average vessel suggests that unless bio-economic conditions in the fishery dramatically improve or management action that restricts capacity is undertaken, federally-permitted Gulf of Mexico shrimp vessels will continue to struggle economically.

    Note: This seminar is part of the 2012 Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar Series

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    2013 Brown Bags

    Deep Sea Corals in the World's Largest Underwater Canyons: Will new data lead to new conservation measures in the Bering Sea?

    Date: Tuesday, January 15, 2013 at 12:00pm EST

    Speaker: John Hocevar, Oceans Campaign Director, Greenpeace

    Presentation slides (pdf format)

    Abstract: Two of the largest underwater canyons in the world, Zhemchug and Pribilof, cut into the edge of the continental shelf in the southeastern Bering Sea. Data are presented showing the distribution of corals and sponges in these spectacular canyons, from submarine research undertaken in 2007 and 2012. High densities of corals were documented, and associations with rockfish demonstrated the corals' importance as fish habitat. Evidence of damage from fishing activities was observed in these remote canyons. Bottom trawling and other benthic fishing gear has been shown to damage corals and sponges that may be very slow to recover from such disturbance. Establishment of conservation zones is a cost effective means to protect benthic habitats in these canyons and the ecosystem services they provide.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Enhancing Program Performance Through Logic Modelling

    Date: Wednesday, January 23, 2013 at 12:00pm EST

    Speakers: Laurie Ekstrand, Evaluation Consultant, NOAA PPI; and John Baek, NOAA Office of Education

    Presentation Slides (pdf format)

    Abstract: In this brown bag, Laurie Ekstrand and John Baek describe how program staff can use logic modelling (graphically illustrating the relationship between a programs’ resources, activities, outputs and outcomes) to support program planning, design and continuous improvement. They will provide examples to illustrate key concepts, common barriers, and misconceptions.

    Note: This seminar is sponsored by the NOAA Evaluation Committee

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    The NOAA Sentinel Site Program

    Date: Tuesday, February 5, 2013 at 12:00pm EST

    Speaker: Jim Sullivan, NOAA Office of Marine Sanctuaries

    Presentation Slides (pdf format)

    Abstract: The NOAA Sentinel Site Program is a place-based, issue driven approach to management. Sentinel Sites bring to bear the full force of NOAA monitoring, modeling and management to help solve concrete problems that people are facing in local communities. This will be a general overview of the program, the Cooperatives, the accomplishments, and next steps.

    NOAA's Sentinel Site Program is an innovative effort built around our National Marine Sanctuaries and National Estuarine Research Reserves. NOAA and our partners are joining forces to tackle specific coastal problems using existing resources, tools, and services to ensure that coastal communities are better prepared for the future.

    It's all about synergy. We have many coastal regions around the nation with a lot of NOAA activity in terms of coastal and ecosystem monitoring, measurements, and tools. These regions also host a wealth of complementary federal, state, and local efforts. While all of these tools, resources, and programs are valuable in their own right, tying them together sets the stage to address specific, broader problems faced by coastal communities in each region.

    The strength of the program is that it brings together a network of people, expertise, and resources that are tied to a single place with a common need. To date, five regions, called "Sentinel Site Cooperatives," are participating in the program.

    The first order of business for NOAA's Sentinel Site Program is to shed light on impacts of climate change, specifically sea level change and coastal inundation. This effort gathers people from many backgrounds and disciplines to develop novel solutions to address real-world local problems, such as how to secure a housing development from rising sea levels or how to best protect a sensitive shoreline habitat.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Evaluation Planning, Logic Models and Program Design

    Date: Tuesday, February 12, 2013 at 12:00pm EST

    Presentation Slides (pdf format)

    Transcript of audio (rtf format)

    Speakers: Sacheen Tavares-Leighton, Evaluation and Training Specialist, Coastal Services Center; and John Baek, Education Evaluator, Office of Education

    Abstract: In this brown bag, Sacheen Tavares-Leighton and John Baek describe how evaluation planning processes connect to logic models and help inform program design. They will provide an example to illustrate the different uses of logic models during different phases of the evaluation planning processes and how that can inform program design.

    Note: This seminar is sponsored by the NOAA Evaluation Committee

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    NOAA's 5 Year Research and Development Plan: Providing input and a path forward

    Date: Thursday, February 14, 2013 at 12:00pm EST

    Speakers: Bob Detrick, Assistant Administrator of OAR, and Shelby Walker, OAR Office of Policy, Planning and Evaluation

    Presentation Slides (pdf format)

    Abstract: NOAA is America’s oldest science agency and our reach extends from the surface of the sun to the bottom of the sea. The NOAA Research and Development (R&D) enterprise provides the foundation to provide the public the valuable information and products NOAA creates.

    The NOAA 5-Year R&D Plan will publicly present NOAA’s R&D priorities for 2013 – 2017 and help articulate and guide future R&D at NOAA. The current draft of the Plan has been developed as a cross Line Office initiative led by the NOAA Research Council. The foundation of the current plan is NOAA’s internal planning efforts under the Next Generation Strategic Plan and Strategy Execution and Evaluation Process. Other strategic documents, including NOAA’s Science Challenge Workshops, have enhanced the current draft.

    To help create a useful and forward thinking plan, NOAA employees and affiliates are encouraged to provide input. Primary audiences for this plan include NOAA leadership and employees, NOAA stakeholders and partners, and Congress. The plan will be revised based on comments received from internal NOAA review and will be released for public comment in Spring 2013 – which is another opportunity to provide input into the plan.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Factors affecting the preservation or alteration of human remains, clothing or metals on the RMS Titanic and H.L Hunley

    Date: Tuesday, February 19, 2013 at 12:00pm EST

    Speaker: Paul Mardikian, Senior Conservator H.L. Hunley Project and Radiation Safety Officer, Clemson University

    Abstract: This presentation will discuss how the macro and micro burial environments of a shipwreck can drastically affect the preservation or alteration of organic and inorganic materials. The impact of depth, salinity, temperature, oxygen, as well as other biological factors on these materials will be reviewed and their interaction with site formation processes identified. In this presentation, conservator Paul Mardikian will examine two shipwrecks, that of the RMS Titanic and the H.L Hunley, the latter a Civil War proto-submarine that sank off the coast of Charleston in 1864 with 8 crewmembers on board, and consider what we can learn from these two case studies.

    Please note: Due to the senstive nature of the material being shown, remote access to this seminar will be restricted to NOAA staff only. Visual materials will not be transmitted via webinar; remote access for NOAA staff will be restricted to the audio portion.


    Dr. Athelstan Spilhaus: How a South African Scallywag Became "The Flywheel of American Science"

    Date: Thursday, March 7, 2013 at 12:00pm EST

    Speaker: Sharon Moen, University of Minnesota Sea Grant

    Abstract: To Walter Cronkite he was "the most interesting person I’ve ever interviewed." President Kennedy joked that the only science he knew was because of him. Colorful, sharp thinking, and intensely productive, Dr. Athelstan Spilhaus (1911-1998) was, among other things, the "Father of Sea Grant." Appointed by presidents and advisor to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, his breathtakingly diverse accomplishments include a sculpture that stands in downtown New York, an oceanographic tool that helped win WWII, and a mishap that fueled the Roswell Incident. As Dr. Spilhaus’s unconventional personality and notable contributions to science and the United States prove, you can do anything if you have the gall!

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    The Snowfall Shuffle: Changes in Global Distributions of Snow in Response to Climate Change

    Date: Tuesday, March 12, 2013 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speaker: Sarah Kapnick, NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory

    Abstract: Understanding snowfall variability is key to understanding water supply in snowmelt-dominated regions. A new high-resolution global climate model CM2.5, developed at the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, is used to explore snow variability in the present climate and as a result of doubling atmospheric CO2. Globally in CM2.5 and coarser models, snowfall increases in the high-to-mid latitudes and decreases in the mid-to-low latitudes. However, in mid-to-low latitudes, CM2.5 is unique in that its high resolution allows it to resolve complex mountain systems, leading to a change in sign in snowfall projections over high mountains in comparison to older models. Over the U.S., the future climate experiment exhibits significant reductions in average annual snowfall with the greatest percentages occurring in the south, along the eastern coast, and the Pacific Northwest.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    The Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species of Wild Animals

    Date: Wednesday, March 13, 2013 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speaker: Shannon Dionne, NOAA Office of International Affairs; Cheri McCarty, and Nina Young, NMFS Office of International Affairs

    Abstract: The Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species of Wild Animals (also known as CMS or the Bonn Convention) aims to conserve terrestrial, aquatic and avian migratory species throughout their range. It is an intergovernmental treaty concerned with the conservation of wildlife and habitats on a global scale. This presentation will focus on CMS as a whole as well as the three species-specific CMS MOUs to which the United States is signatory: the Memorandum of Understanding on the Conservation of Migratory Sharks (Sharks MOU); the Memorandum of Understanding on the Conservation of Cetaceans and their Habitats in the Pacific Island Region (Pacific Cetaceans MOU); and the Memorandum of Understanding on the Conservation and Management of Marine Turtles and their Habitats of the Indian Ocean and South-East Asia (IOSEA).

    Note: This seminar is sponsored by the International Section of the NOAA General Counsel Office.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Achieving Program Performance Excellence: What Using the Baldrige Criteria Can Do for Your Organization

    Date: Tuesday, March 19, 2013 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speaker: Dr. Sandra Byrne, Social Scientist, Baldrige National Quality Program, NIST

    Abstract: What you will discover are the questions about seven critical aspects of managing and performing as an organization:

    • Leadership
    • Strategic planning
    • Customer focus
    • Measurement, analysis, and knowledge management
    • Workforce focus
    • Operations focus
    • Results

    You can self assess your program by answering questions in these 7 focus areas that work together as a unique, integrated, systems-focused performance management framework. Answering the questions helps you:

    • align your resources;
    • identify strengths and opportunities for improvement;
    • improve communication, productivity, and effectiveness; and
    • achieve your strategic goals.

    As a result,

    • You deliver ever-improving value to your customers and stakeholders, which contributes to organizational sustainability.
    • You improve your organization's overall effectiveness and capability.
    • Your organization improves and learns.
    • Your workforce members learn and grow.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    The Ocean Project: Updates and Major Findings

    Date: Wednesday, March 20, 2013 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speaker: William Mott, Executive Director, The Ocean Project; and Douglas Meyer, Bernuth and Williamson

    Abstract: An update on the major findings from The Ocean Project's ongoing public opinion and strategic communications research initiative, America and the Ocean, including how those findings have been distributed and are now being applied, especially by zoos, aquariums and museums in experimental efforts aimed at inspiring visitors to do more to help conserve the ocean.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Heat stress reduces labor capacity under climate warming

    Date: Thursday, March 28, 2013 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speaker: John Dunne, NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory

    Presentation Slides (pdf)

    Abstract: A fundamental aspect of greenhouse-gas-induced warming is a global-scale increase in absolute humidity. Under continued warming, this response has been shown to pose increasingly severe limitations on human activity in tropical and midlatitudes during peak months of heat stress. One heat-stress metric with broad occupational health applications is wetbulb globe temperature. We combine wet-bulb globe temperatures from global climate historical reanalysis and Earth System Model (ESM2M) projections with industrial and military guidelines for an acclimated individual’s occupational capacity to safely perform sustained labour under environmental heat stress (labor capacity) - here defined as a global population-weighted metric temporally fixed at the 2010 distribution. We estimate that environmental heat stress has reduced labor capacity to 90% in peak months over the past few decades. ESM2M projects labor capacity reduction to 80% in peak months by 2050. Under the highest scenario considered (Representative Concentration Pathway 8.5), ESM2M projects labor capacity reduction to less than 40% by 2200 in peak months, with most tropical and mid-latitudes experiencing extreme climatological heat stress. Uncertainties and caveats associated with these projections include climate sensitivity, climate warming patterns, CO2 emissions, future population distributions, and technological and societal change.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Potable-Water Production and Shore Protection Using a Wave-Energy Conversion Technique

    Date: Thursday, April 4, 2013 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speakers: Michael E. McCormick and Robert C. Murtha, Murtech, Inc

    Presentation Slides (pdf)

    Abstract: Two floating systems have been created for the diverse goals of the production of potable-water and the protection of shorelines. The basic ideas of leading to these systems is that products or services other than the production of electricity can effectively be supplied by exploiting the energy of ocean waves. The two systems discussed are designed to take advantage of the phenomenon of wave diffraction focusing. That is, by designing the floating systems to radiate waves that destructively interfere with the incident waves, wave energy is re-supplied to the zone of interference. As a result, the systems in question receive more wave energy than is in an incident wave crest having a width equal to the breadth of the body.

    The system designed for potable-water production is an articulated hinged-barge system, called the Articulated Wave Energy Conversion System, or AWECS. The relative motions of the three barges comprising the system energize high-pressure water pumps positioned over the connecting hinges. These pumps supply the pressurized water to a reverse-osmosis (RO) desalination system. Research efforts leading to a prototype to be deployed this year include smallscale wave tank test and a nine year full-scale study of the articulated barge system. The 40-meter long prototype is designed to supply approximately 100,000 gallons-per-day in a near-shore wave climate having an average wave height of 1m and an average wave period of 6.5s. The deployment site is off the Delaware coast, north of the Indian River Inlet.

    The shore protection system is called the Antenna Buoy (AB). The design is to take advantage of the diffraction focusing to attract wave energy. The wave energy incident upon the AB causes both axial and angular motions of the body. Because of the geometry, a significant portion of the captured energy is dissipated by viscous-pressure losses in the alternating wakes of the body. The primary geometric features causing the dissipation are vertical fins (radiating out from a vertical circular-cylindrical float) and a horizontal circular bottom plate. In full-scale tank tests, the body was found to reduce the transmission coefficient by up to 40%. Arrays of the AB will have three 2013 deployments in the Chesapeake Bay.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Extinction Risk in the Marine Realm: The Global Marine Species Assessment and the Gulf of Mexico after the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill

    Date: Tuesday, April 9, 2013 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speakers: Roger McManus, IUCN SSC Senior Counsel; and Kent Carpenter, Old Dominion University

    Presentation Slides (pdf)

    Abstract: Dr. Kent Carpenter and Roger McManus will review the IUCN Global Marine Species Assessment progress in conducting a review of 20,000 marine species under the standards of the IUCN Red List, with particular focus on the assessments conducted and planned for the Gulf of Mexico in response to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. They will summarize current efforts to provide tools for examining extinction risk and conservation status of marine species based on existing and potential threats. This project is a partnership with the Harte Institute for Gulf of Mexico Studies at Texas A&M University -Corpus Christi. These tools are based on species data accumulated for the Red List assessments, including distributional data and spatial planning capacity, data on experts in Gulf species, and information on past and current recovery and conservation plans.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    "Beach Lovers" and "Greens":A Worldwide Empirical Analysis of Coastal Tourism

    Date: Thursday, April 11, 2013 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speaker: Laura Onofri

    Abstract: In this presentation, Dr. Laura Onofri will begin by discussing how markets work, and how environmental economists analyze non-market issues. Then, Dr. Onofri will present the results of her work on coastal tourism, published recently with Dr. Paulo Nunes in Ecological Economics. In this study, the authors examine issues of coastal tourism, and describe their worldwide analysis of domestic and international coastal tourism flows. After building a worldwide dataset including natural and economic coastal environments, the authors design an integrated-model that estimates the demand for coastal destinations. Dr. Onofri will share with us the results of this analysis, which show that there are two differentiated touristic demand segments, denoting different preferences for coastal tourism. She will then discuss these results from a tourism and conservation policy perspective.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Communities-Based Fisheries Management in Liberia

    Date: Tuesday, April 16, 2013 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speaker: Patrick Sayon, World Bank West Africa Regional Fisheries Program, Coordinator for the Community Sciences Program in Liberia

    Abstract: Liberia Community Sciences Program was designed and launched in 2009 with support from the World Bank. The Community Sciences program is designed to build capacity of Liberian artisanal fisher communities to monitor and better manage their local coastal and inshore marine resources. As both a resources management and an environment conservation tool, Community Sciences directly supports an ongoing policy shift in fisheries management in West Africa to a "rights based" approach. This policy shift assigns rights over exploitation of inshore marine resources to fisher communities, and largely devolves responsibility for the health and sustainability of those resources to those communities.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Fish Sex! How, Where, and When They Do It (and When They Don't Have To)

    Date: Thursday, April 18, 2013 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speaker: Grantly Galland, Sea Grant Knauss Fellow, NOAA Office of International Affairs

    Presentation Slides (pdf)

    Abstract: There are well over 30 thousand species of fishes, living in water (most of the time) from desert springs and alpine lakes to deep ocean trenches, and while they all share that fundamental drive to reproduce, their methods are as varied as the habitats in which they live. With so many species to study, it's no wonder that we have learned that fishes have tried it all. If you can think of a way to reproduce, a fish has probably tried it. In fact, after a review of fish sex, I'm sure you'll agree that mammals (including humans) are downright un-creative! Sex change, hermaphroditism, multiple paternity, group spawning, sneak spawning, parthenogenesis, automictic parthenogenesis, gynogenesis, and hybridogenesis are just some of the amazing sexual "ideas" that other vertebrates (and some pop culture or science fiction writers) got from fishes.

    Note: This seminar is part of the 2013 Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar Series

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    The Optimal Size of a Marine Protected Area (MPA): A BIOECONOMIC MODEL Integrated with "SASI" SYSTEM, Case of Eastern Indonesia

    Date: Thursday, April 18, 2013 at 12:30pm EDT

    Speaker: Umi Muawanah, Sea Grant Knauss Fellow, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

    Presentation Slides (pdf)

    Abstract: MPA is a promising tool for fisheries management and conservation goal. At the same time, traditional marine tenures have existed centuries around the globe. This paper tries to take a closer look on the integration of modern fisheries management measures such as MPA and traditional system such as "Sasi" found in Eastern part of Indonesia. The bio-economic model determines the optimal size of an MPA incorporating both its economic and ecological benefits. We apply the framework to the sea cucumber fishery. The optimal MPA size to be 37.77 % of the total area and the combination of "Sasi" and MPA results in the highest economic returns compared to "Sasi (old traditional marine tenure in Molucca)" only and open access management systems. An important policy implication is that fishery management should consider a combination tool such as "Sasi" and MPA. Since the "Sasi" tradition is fading away in Indonesia, our finding could be important in supporting its revitalization.

    Note: This seminar is part of the 2013 Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar Series

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Great Lakes Economies and Ecosystems: Will Extreme Low Water Levels Leave Them High and Dry?

    Date: Tuesday, April 23, 2013 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speakers: Steve Gill, NOAA COOPs; and Drew Gronewold, NOAA GLERL

    Presentation Slides (pdf)

    Abstract: Record low water levels were at NOAA’s National Ocean Service (NOS) Center for Oceanographic Products and Services (CO-OPS) monitoring stations throughout the upper Great Lakes starting in December of 2012. Given the range of Great Lakes water level measurements, the fact that Lake Michigan-Huron reached "all-time" lows has significant implications for the region. Impacts include excessive receding of coastlines, reduced navigability of shipping channels, and diminished hydroelectric power capacity. NOAA CO-OPS, in partnership with NOAA’s Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory (GLERL), are part of a regional collaboration of federal agencies focusing on understanding Great Lakes water level dynamics. NOAA’s monitoring infrastructure, including the CO-OPS monitoring stations, and modeling capabilities provide critical support of that collaboration.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Improve Program Results by Linking Planning and Performance: Part 1 – Primer

    Date: Monday, April 29, 2013 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speaker: Liz Davenport, Senior Program Analyst, National Ocean Service, Management and Budget

    Presentation Slides (pdf)

    Abstract: Have you been asked recently how your program achieved evidence of progress related to NOAA’s Next Generation Strategic Plan (NGSP) for FY 2011 and FY 2012? Did you identify noteworthy achievements and remaining challenges? Have you examined performance measures and milestones and other performance data and assessed their effectiveness in validating the evidence of progress?

    Between now and February 2014, NOAA will amend the NGSP as required by GPRA MA for all Federal agencies. Knowing what you, your program, office, and leadership envision as “success” and how that advances priorities for NGSP Goal and Enterprise Objectives is critically important, particularly right now. This training (Part 1 and Part 2) can help you focus limited program and administrative resources for more meaningful results. Where are changes needed to improve strategy, budget, and/or performance? Are there ways to better focus limited program and performance management resources for more meaningful results? Part 1 is the foundation for Part 2, a primer followed by a toolkit, that together give you key principles and tools aligned with DOC/NOAA and OMB/Congressional requirements but adaptable to changing circumstances, the new norm. Between the summary slides and detailed appendices, these tools will stimulate thinking and may help detect what can be improved.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Ocean Fertilization, Marine Geoengineering and the London Convention/London Protocol

    Date: Tuesday, April 30, 2013 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speakers: Richard Mannix, International Section of NOAA's Office of General Counsel and Allison Reed, International Affairs Specialist, NOAA Office of International Affairs

    Presentation Slides (pdf)

    Abstract: Richard Mannix from the International Section of NOAA's Office of General Counsel and Allison Reed from NOAA’s Office of International Affairs will provide an update on efforts within the international community to authorize and regulate legitimate scientific research into the use of ocean fertilization techniques as a climate mitigation measure. Their focus will be on recent developments at the London Convention and London Protocol and the movement there toward creation of mechanisms for the assessment and regulation of specific proposals to undertake, at a minimum, more advanced research in these techniques. Ms. Reed and Mr. Mannix will also discuss a growing interest among some of the Parties to the London Convention and Protocol to go a step further and to develop a broader regime to regulate other "marine geoengineering" activities as well. In addition, they will touch upon the recent unauthorized attempt to fertilize the ocean off the coast of British Columbia and the reaction of the international community to that effort. Ms. Reed will provide an overview of the process, discuss the position the U.S. has taken, and describe the progress which has been made by the Contracting Parties. Mr. Mannix will set the subject within the context of international law and discuss the relationship between the London Convention/Protocol and customary international law, as chiefly codified in the Law of the Sea Convention, and he will highlight some ethical and governance concerns.

    Note: This seminar is sponsored by the International Section of the NOAA General Counsel Office

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    NOAA’s Habitat Blueprint - A new approach to Improving fisheries, marine life, and coastal community resiliency through habitat conservation

    Date: Wednesday, May 1, 2013 at 2:00pm EDT

    Speakers: Helen McMillan, NOAA Habitat Blueprint National Coordinator (Office of Habitat Conservation, NMFS)

    Presentation Slides (pdf)

    Abstract: NOAA’s Habitat Blueprint was created in 2011 to promote a more collaborative and integrated cross-NOAA approach to addressing NOAA’s habitat conversation mandates and to demonstrate the many positive impacts and benefits that NOAA’s habitat protection and restoration activities provide. This presentation will provide an overview of the three major components of the Blueprint - establishing Habitat Focus Areas, enhancing Habitat Science, and strengthening Habitat Policy and Legislation - and report on progress that has been made over the last two years. You will learn what a FAST is, how taking a place-based approach to addressing habitat conservation issues is creating new and exciting collaboration opportunities among NOAA Line Offices, how the Blueprint is connected to other related efforts such as the new NOAA Habitat Conservation Team and NOAA’s Sentinel Site Program, and who to talk to if you want to learn more about getting involved in this growing NOAA initiative.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    A US marine mammal conservation initiative through the IWC: Mitigating whale entanglement

    Date: Friday, May 3, 2013 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speaker: David Mattila, NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

    Abstract: The IWC is the only global, intergovernmental organization dealing with all conservation and management issues related to large whales. With a membership of 88 countries the IWC provides a forum for governments from many different regions of the world to discuss issues relating to the conservation and management of whales. Through its scientific and management expertise, the US has made significant contributions to these efforts, including the understanding and mitigation of ship strikes, acoustic and other harassment, pollutants and disease, and entanglement (bycatch).

    This presentation will focus in particular on significant progress in the understanding and mitigation of large whale entanglement made by a US initiative through the IWC. David Mattila, an expert on large whale entanglement response from NOAA-HIHWNMS, will present the projects and initiatives he has forwarded while on detail to the IWC.

    Approximately 308,000 whales, dolphins and porpoises die from entanglement in manmade materials every year. Based on a series of workshops hosted by the US (2010 & 2011), the member countries of the IWC agreed that:

    1. Any species of whale can become entangled anywhere in the world’s oceans where it coexists with high risk materials (i.e. rope and net).
    2. The frequency of such events are grossly under-reported.
    3. This is a severe animal welfare, conservation, human safety and economic concern.

    The two highest, consensus recommendations made by the workshops, and subsequently endorsed by the member nations were:

    • Building international capacity to understand and respond to entanglements where they occur around the world, and
    • Work toward prevention, as it is the only real solution.

    To carry out these recommendations, the US detailed David Mattila to the IWC. The first objective of Mr. Mattila’s work at the IWC was to gather the directors of all of the world’s entanglement response programs in order to reach a consensus on disentanglement “best practices”, and a strategy and curriculum for capacity building. This is now the only marine animal rescue effort which has reached such international consensus on standards and protocols. Arising from that success, seminars, trainings and apprenticeships have been conducted for over 20 countries and more than 500 trainees from around the world, teaching all aspects of the science and management of the entanglement issue.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Improve Program Results by Linking Planning and Performance: Part 2 - Toolkit

    Date: Tuesday, May 7, 2013 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speaker: Liz Davenport, Senior Program Analyst, National Ocean Service, Management and Budget

    Presentation Slides (pdf)

    Abstract: Have you been asked recently how your program achieved evidence of progress related to NOAA’s Next Generation Strategic Plan (NGSP) for FY 2011 and FY 2012? Did you identify noteworthy achievements and remaining challenges? Have you examined performance measures and milestones and other performance data and assessed their effectiveness in validating the evidence of progress?

    Between now and February 2014, NOAA will amend the NGSP as required by GPRA MA for all Federal agencies. Knowing what you, your program, office, and leadership envision as “success” and how that advances priorities for NGSP Goal and Enterprise Objectives is critically important, particularly right now. This training (Part 1 and Part 2) can help you focus limited program and administrative resources for more meaningful results. Where are changes needed to improve strategy, budget, and/or performance? Are there ways to better focus limited program and performance management resources for more meaningful results? Part 1 is the foundation for Part 2, a primer followed by a toolkit, that together give you key principles and tools aligned with DOC/NOAA and OMB/Congressional requirements but adaptable to changing circumstances, the new norm. Between the summary slides and detailed appendices, these tools will stimulate thinking and may help detect what can be improved.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Impact and Value of Establishing Hispanic Affinity Groups

    Date: Wednesday, May 15, 2013 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speaker: Rosanna Torres, President, Census Latino Employee Organization (CLEO)

    Abstract: Ms Torres will discuss how CLEO as an affinity group:

    • Improves capital and human value at the Census Bureau
    • Promotes awareness of diversity and inclusion strategies
    • Shares ideas outside of their business units

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Some like it hot: Physiology, biogeography, and the impacts of climate change on three marine mussel species

    Date: Thursday, May 16, 2013 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speaker: Elizabeth Fly, NOAA Climate Program Office; U.S. Global Change Research Program

    Abstract: Understanding what factors affect the distribution of a species helps us better understand its life history and potential impacts from external forces such as climate change, habitat destruction, and the introduction of invasive species. The closely-related marine mussels Mytilus edulis, M. trossulus, and M. galloprovincialis provide an ideal study system for the effects of a changing environment on the biogeography of a species. These three species form a biogeographic replacement series with respect to temperature, as one species replaces another as climate varies with latitude. We examined several of the mechanisms potentially constraining the distribution of these species and developed mechanistic species distribution models to predict their biogeographic ranges.

    Note: This seminar is part of the 2013 Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar Series

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Agricultural wetland restorations achieve diverse native wetland plant communities but differ from undisturbed wetlands

    Date: Thursday, May 16, 2013 at 12:30pm EDT

    Speaker: Metthea Yepsen, NOAA Restoration Center, NMFS Office of Habitat Conservation

    Abstract: Ideally, restoration is the process of returning an ecosystem to a pre-disturbance state. In practice, specific functions and services are targeted in a restoration because it is too complex to attempt a complete ecosystem restoration. As part of a multi-investigator project to assess the effectiveness of USDA-Natural Resources Conservation Service wetland restoration measures, we compared plant community composition in 47 sites in the USA Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain in Maryland, Delaware, Virginia, and North Carolina. Fifteen sites represented natural, unmanaged, wetlands from two hydrogeomorphic classes (depressions and flats; hereafter "natural" sites), 16 were farmed ditched and drained former wetlands ("prior-converted" sites), and 17 were restored depressional wetlands ("restored" sites). Findings indicated that restored wetlands had developed diverse native wetland plant communities but thus far differ from that of natural wetlands, raising questions about both the goals of ecosystem restoration and our ability to restore ecosystems back to pre-disturbance conditions.

    Note: This seminar is part of the 2013 Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar Series

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    The Sustainable Working Waterfronts Toolkit: Connecting Decision-makers, Landowners, and Users with Information and Tools for Preserving and Enhancing our Nation's Working Waterfronts

    Date: Friday, May 17, 2013 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speaker: Stephanie Showalter Otts, J.D., Director, National Sea Grant Law Center

    Abstract: This presentation will provide an overview of the newly launched Sustainable Working Waterfronts Toolkit - a web-based information portal that contains a wealth of information about the historical and current use of waterfront space, the economic value of working waterfronts, and legal, policy, and financing tools that can be used to preserve, enhance, and protect these valuable areas. The Toolkit was developed by a subcommittee of the National Working Waterfront Network (NWWN) with the generous financial support of the Economic Development Administration of the U.S. Department of Commerce. Please join us to learn more about the Toolkit, the NWWN, and working waterfront initiatives around the country.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Restoration of the Gulf of Mexico: The Need for a Collaborative Approach

    Date: Tuesday, May 28, 2013 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speakers: Eric Schwaab, Assistant Administrator for Fisheries, performing the functions and duties of the Assistant Secretary for Conservation and Management, NOAA; and Lois Schiffer, General Counsel, NOAA

    Abstract: The Deepwater Horizon oil spill caused extensive damage to the Gulf Coast's natural resources and devastating local economies and communities that rely on a healthy Gulf ecosystem. This major oil spill occurred in an area already impaired by years of adverse environmental and economic impacts. After the immediate response to the spill, federal agencies and states began a series of steps to restore the ecosystem and the economies that depend on them. Three significant sources of funding will eventually be available to address these concerns. First, under the Oil Pollution Act, federal and state agencies with trust responsibility for the natural resources in the area have formed a Trustee Council to assess the damage and develop a restoration plan to restore the resources to their pre-spill status and compensate for lost use. They are also working to use the $1 billion early restoration money that BP has provided. Second, Congress passed the RESTORE Act in June, 2012; that law provides that 80% of any civil penalty funds paid under the Clean Water Act go to the Gulf and are to be spent under five different approaches including a science program. Finally, under criminal plea agreements with BP and Transocean, the Department of Justice recommended, and the Court adopted, payments of $2.8 billion to be made to the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation (NFWF) for spending among the Gulf States for restoration and related purposes. The total amount of funds available through these processes remains uncertain.

    Today we will focus on the work of science and restoration. State, federal and local agencies, academic institutions, environmental groups, and many other partners are actively working to plan and execute significant science and restoration efforts pursuant to the specific authorities that guide each process. Further all these efforts and the entire Gulf region will benefit from collaborative work toward a science-based approach to regional ecosystem restoration that focuses on the overall long-term health, prosperity and resilience of the Gulf region. This session will highlight the individual science and restoration efforts underway and identify potential approaches for enhanced coordination.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Science, Observation, Monitoring, and Technology Program (aka NOAA RESTORE Act Science Program)

    Date: Wednesday, June 5, 2013 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speaker: Russ Beard, Director, National Coastal Data Development Center, NODC, NESDIS; NOAA Gulf of Mexico Regional Collaboration Team Lead; Acting Director, NOAA RESTORE Act Science Program

    Presentation Slides (pdf format)

    Abstract: In July 2012, the Resources and Ecosystems Sustainability, Tourist Opportunities, and Revived Economies of the Gulf Coast States (RESTORE) Act was signed into law. The RESTORE Act directs that the Clean Water Act penalties paid by the parties responsible for the Deepwater Horizon oil spill be deposited into a trust fund and authorizes the trust fund to be used to support ecosystem and economic restoration along the Gulf coast and in the Gulf of Mexico. Included within the RESTORE Act is authorization for NOAA, in consultation with others, to administer a "Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Science, Observation, Monitoring, and Technology Program" (aka NOAA RESTORE Act Science Program). Russ Beard (Acting Program Director) will provide an overview of the program - its mission, framework, organizational structure, focus areas, expected duration, and types of activities eligible to be funded. The importance of leveraging and building partnerships and the relationship of the Science Program to the other science and restoration activities in the Gulf of Mexico will also be discussed.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Invisible Lines in the Ocean: An Introduction to the U.S. Extended Continental Shelf and Maritime Boundaries

    Date: Wednesday, June 19, 2013 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speaker: Brian Van Pay, US Department of State

    Abstract: The United States has one of the most complex set of invisible lines in the world that compose our maritime zones and maritime boundaries. These invisible lines determine the extent of our sovereign rights and the resources we can protect, manage, and use. The United States has the largest Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) in the world (more than 11 million square kilometers) and one of the largest Extended Continental Shelves (ECS) in the world (more than 1 million square kilometers). Complicating this picture is the fact that our maritime zones overlap with the maritime zones of 16 different countries across the globe. While the United States only has three land boundaries, it may need as many as 29 maritime boundaries with these 16 countries, and slightly more than half of those maritime boundaries have yet to be resolved. But how are all these invisible lines in the ocean determined? Join us for a presentation from Brian Van Pay from the Office of Ocean and Polar Affairs at the Department of State, where he serves as Executive Director of the Extended Continental Shelf Project and member of the maritime boundary negotiating team.

    Note: This seminar is sponsored by the International Section of the NOAA General Counsel Office

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Marine reserves, an economic approach: using data on behavior to recommend a fine

    Date: Thursday, June 20, 2013 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speaker: Marie L. Fujitani, Knauss Fellow, NMFS Office of Aquaculture

    Abstract: Marine reserves can protect resources while sustaining economies dependent on the sea. For reserves to "succeed" they must alter the behavior of human users, and often a fine is employed. Fine amounts can be arbitrary, and may be too low to be effective or too high to be socially or politically palatable. I use recreational angling trip data from a region in Mexico to model how anglers altered travel choices in response to a marine reserve, and evaluated the "fine" anglers perceived and responded to. The value (and behavioral change) is small. I then project fines that would reduce trips to the reserve, showing a non-linear increase in fine to discourage an additional unit of travel. These results suggest for this system a process to find a data-driven level of fine that can be both effective and not undesirably high. My talk touches upon work by Nobel Laureate in economics Gary Becker on rational law-breaking.

    Note: This seminar is part of the 2013 Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar Series

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    A Critical Discussion of Critical Habitat Designations: Is Compliance With the National Environmental Policy Act Required?

    Date: Thursday, June 20, 2013 at 12:30pm EDT

    Speaker: Mele N. Coleman, Sea Grant Knauss Fellow, National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Specialist, Office of Program Planning & Integration (PPI)

    Abstract: If you are interested in NOAA's efforts to protect species that are listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), you will most likely be interested in learning about Mele's legal research on whether critical habitat designations under the ESA require NEPA compliance. During this brown bag, Mele will discuss her article on the issue, entitled: A Critical Discussion of Critical Habitat Designations: Is Compliance With the National Environmental Policy Act Required? This article was published in Environmental Law (Lewis & Clark Law School) in Fall 2012, and is available online (pdf). In essence, the article tells the stories behind a 27 year-old split between the Ninth and Tenth Circuit Courts of Appeals, argues that critical habitat designations should not require NEPA compliance, and encourages NOAA and FWS to maximize their conservation of endangered and threatened species by jointly developing a consistent national policy on NEPA compliance.

    Note: This seminar is part of the 2013 Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar Series

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Protective Action and Evacuation Responses During Hurricane Katrina: A Gendered Analysis

    Date: Tuesday, June 25, 2013 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speaker: Michelle Dovil, student at the Howard University/NOAA Center of Atmospheric Science (NCAS)

    Presentation slides (pdf format)

    Abstract: The impending threats of natural hazards have become a major part of our daily lives. Every year, thousands of weather forecasts are disseminated to inform, warn, and prepare citizens regarding the forthcoming activity of weather hazards. The United States alone is susceptible to over eight different types of natural hazards throughout each of its geological regions. Hazards such as floods, earthquakes, snowstorms, and hurricanes in recent years have caused billions of dollars in damage and thousands of deaths. In order to reduce the impact of these hazards, effective risk communication is imperative. A risk population's ability to receive and perceive warning messages has a direct influence on the protective action behavior they choose to engage in during times of disaster. The purpose of this study was to assess the degree to which the Protective Action Decision Model could be utilized to explain risk communication and protective action behaviors as it relates to gender. In so doing, this study assessed the impact of informational warnings, protective action recommendations, and receiver characteristics on the protective actions by men and women during Hurricane Katrina. Gender was especially examined to see if it would have any significant impact on whether or not an individual chose to evacuate prior to Katrina making landfall.

    Furthermore, it is important to note that an individual can take protective actions and not evacuate. This is not to suggest that protective actions take precedence over evacuating, especially in such extreme cases like Katrina, but this study does seek to shed light on how at risk populations prepare when evacuating is not an option. Results from this study revealed that gender did not have a significant impact on taking protective actions. Although women were more likely to take protective actions than men, in some cases the differences were not that significant. However, results from this study were consistent with the PADM in assessing protective actions based on informational warnings, protective action recommendations, and some receiver characteristics as all three components were found to be significant in relation to at least half of the protective actions recommended.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Satellite Oceanography of Fronts

    Date: Wednesday, June 26, 2013 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speaker: Igor Belkin, University of Rhode Island

    Abstract: The last decade saw proliferation of observational studies of ocean fronts from in situ and remote sensing data. This presentation is focused on recent progress in this field, particularly on satellite observations. Several satellite missions presented great potential for frontal studies. This potential has been largely realized with regard to SST fronts, but not CHL fronts. Among such missions, the NOAA Pathfinder Project and MODIS-Aqua/Terra stand out. The ultimate success of frontal studies from satellite data hinges on state-of-the-art computer algorithms for front detection. The Cayula-Cornillon histogram algorithm (CCA) remains the top-notch front detector. I will present examples of frontal products derived from frontal maps generated by CCA during the on-going global survey of SST fronts initiated and funded by NASA. Alternative algorithms have been suggested, implemented and validated, particularly the Belkin-O'Reilly gradient algorithm (BOA) adopted by NOAA. Frontal maps generated by BOA from CHL imagery supplied by MODIS Aqua are now freely and publicly available from NOAA.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    GPRA Modernization a New Framework for Strategic Planning and the DOC Balanced Scorecard

    Date: Friday, July 12, 2013 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speaker: Chris Heflin, DOC Director of Performance Excellence

    Presentation Slides (pdf format)

    Abstract: GPRA Modernization is designed to create focused and actionable Federal agency strategic plans. The law and OMBs revisions to A-11 establish a new schedule and a new format for strategic planning. All the change work well with the DOC system of balanced scorecards and emphasis on becoming a "learning organization." The presentation will cover how DOC's performance management system dovetails with Federal Direction.

    Note: This seminar is sponsored by the NOAA Evaluation Committee.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Zooplankton Composition in a Strong, Persistent Upwelling Region - What can it tell us?

    Date: Thursday, July 18, 2013 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speaker: Rachel E. Fontana, Sea Grant Knauss Fellow, NOAA Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research

    Abstract: Understanding variability in zooplankton abundance and composition are important aspects to elucidating changes in ocean conditions. Time series of zooplankton data span the west coast of North America; however, large regional gaps in data collection exist for the strong, persistent upwelling area located from southern Oregon to north-central California. We investigated a zooplankton time series collected within the Gulf of the Farallones-Cordell Bank region from 2004 to 2009, which is located within this persistent upwelling zone. Zooplankton abundance and species composition differed significantly throughout this time series. We found a close linkage between this zooplankton time series and changes in basin-wide, regional, and in situ environmental variables. Understanding zooplankton abundance and composition in the Gulf of the Farallones-Cordell Bank region will assist with elucidating changes in seabird populations and may assist with future year-to-year predictions of general ecosystem health.

    Note: This seminar is part of the 2013 Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar Series

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Underwater Underworlds: What stories do underwater caves hold?

    Date: Thursday, July 18, 2013 at 12:30pm EDT

    Speaker: Sepp Haukebo, Sea Grant Kanuss Fellow, NOAA Office of Education

    Abstract: Anchialine caves (meaning near the sea) persist throughout coastlines around the world and provide cave diving scientists a unique opportunity to investigate the ecological and biogeochemical secrets of the underworld. Previously believed to be devoid of life, these lightless ecosystems have been found to harbor a range of organisms from cave fish to living fossils like remipedes. Because species are often endemic to a single cave system the exploration of new anchialine caves has led to the discovery of novel species, orders, and even a new class of cave-adapted critters. Recently anchialine cave research has been used to constrain historic climate records, elucidate the role of chemoautotrophic bacteria in coastal aquifers, and characterize the effects of ocean acidification on coral reefs. Throughout this presentation we will discuss the past, present, and future directions of anchialine cave research around the world.

    Note: This seminar is part of the 2013 Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar Series

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Social media use by minority populations in weather-related crisis situations

    Date: Thursday, July 25, 2013 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speaker: Crystal M. Adkisson, Ph.D., Fellow - NOAA Center for Atmospheric Sciences/Howard University

    Abstract: During weather-related crisis situations, social media such as blogs, Facebook and Twitter, can assist in the process of disseminating information to gratify needs of the audience. Appropriate use of social media in weather-related crisis situations can assist in information dissemination and comprehension by recipients. Social media are immediate, unfiltered, and can be accurate and perceived credible if planned appropriately.

    This research sought to understand gratifications sought by African Americans through use of social media in weather-related crisis situations and, more specifically, if frequency of use of social media correlated to their use of social media to gratify those needs. Recognizing that the communication patterns of African Americans are unique should be considered when preparing for and responding to weather-related crisis situations. Understanding why African Americans use specific media will allow more targeted messaging.

    The importance of the present research is that it incorporates emerging technologies into crisis communication planning and execution that is beneficial to governmental, humanitarian, and aid producing organizations. This research sought to identify the most effective media that the African American community utilize to seek information in a weather-related crisis situation. With this information, crisis communicators will be able to effectively plan their strategies before a crisis and have procedures established to respond in a timely manner once a crisis occurs, through channels that empirical research has shown to be effective.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    From Shoreline Seining to Student Training: Shoreline development effects on near-shore communities in Chesapeake Bay

    Date: Thursday, August 15, 2013 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speaker: Theresa M. Davenport, Sea Grant Knauss Fellow, NOAA / OAR / PPE

    Presentation Slides (pdf format)

    Abstract: Hardened shorelines and their construction introduce stressors by altering near-shore habitats. I investigated the impacts of shoreline development on near-shore communities at four sub-estuaries within Chesapeake Bay, subjected to different types of shoreline change. I used a before-after control-impact (BACI) study design to examine benthic infaunal communities (density, biomass, and diversity), blue crab abundance, and near-shore fishes (abundance and diversity) before and after shoreline modification.

    The benthic community responded to shoreline modification in complex ways often driven by opportunistic species. At all sites, habitat changes resulting from shoreline development, such as shoreline complexity and sediment grain size, explain changes in the benthic community.

    A concurrent classroom teaching experience allowed me to share this work with local high school students, introduce them to coastal ecology, and collect data on their perception of science, before and after our interactions, using a BACI design.

    Note: This seminar is part of the 2013 Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar Series

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Shifting environmental baselines among small-scale fishers in the Galera-San Francisco Marine Reserve, Ecuador

    Date: Thursday, August 15, 2013 at 12:30pm EDT

    Presentation Slides (pdf format)

    Speaker: Carrie Soltanoff, Knauss Fellow, NOAA Fisheries Office of International Affairs

    Abstract: Shifting environmental baselines refers to the concept that each generation of fishers, and fishery managers, see the current state of the fishery as the natural, or baseline, abundance. To investigate this phenomenon adjacent to a recently established marine reserve, 92 fishers from three generations were interviewed. Differences in fishing practices and perceptions of the fishery among generations were revealed, including that older fishers stayed closer to shore and found the fishery to be depleted. Shifting baselines can impede reserve success because younger fishers may believe that an area remains underfished and therefore not see value in restrictive conservation measures. Given data-poor fisheries, baselines and targets set from present-day numbers may be too low to realize conservation goals, particularly if ecological knowledge from older generations reveals that fisheries are depleted. The presence of shifting baselines underscores the importance of incorporating local knowledge into management and education measures for a marine reserve.

    Note: This seminar is part of the 2013 Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar Series

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    NOAA Central Library Mix and Mingle

    Date: Thursday, August 29, 2013 at 1:00pm EDT

    Abstract: Join the NOAA Central Library for coffee and light refreshments, meet other NOAA employees, and learn about NOAA Central Library services!


    NEPA and NHPA: A Handbook for Integrating NEPA and Section 106

    Date: Thursday, September 5, 2013 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speaker: Kelly Fanizzo, program analyst and attorney advisor with the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP)

    Abstract: This presentation will focus on NEPA and NHPA: A Handbook for Integrating NEPA and Section 106 (pdf), published jointly by the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation and the White House Council on Environmental Quality in March 2013. The new handbook provides advice to Federal agencies, applicants, project sponsors, and consultants on how to take advantage of existing regulatory provisions to align the NEPA process and the NHPA Section 106 review process. Federal agencies have independent statutory obligations under NEPA and NHPA. For many projects, agencies can use the procedures and documentation required by NEPA to comply with NHPA Section 106, instead of undertaking a separate process. The handbook explains how to align NEPA and NHPA Section 106 processes for maximum efficiency and public input, and provides a series of roadmaps for coordination of the two statutes.

    Note: This seminar is sponsored by the International Section of the NOAA General Counsel Office.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Implementation of MARPOL Annex VI: Air Emissions

    Date: Tuesday, September 10, 2013 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speakers: Matt Haber, Senior Policy Advisor; Meetu Kaul, Attorney-Advisor; Seema Kakade, Attorney-Advisor; and Tony Miller, Engineer, U.S. EPA

    Abstract: Please join us for a brown bag presentation by staff members of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Office of Civil Enforcement on the current state of play on the implementation and enforcement of the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships Annex VI (emissions) standards, as codified in the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships (APPS).

    The International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships (MARPOL) regulates marine pollution from ships. Specifically, Annex VI of MARPOL addresses air pollution from oceangoing ships. Annex VI, among other things, establishes limits on NOx emissions from marine diesel engines. Annex VI also provides more stringent engine emission standards and fuel sulfur limits for ships that operate in specially designated Emission Control Areas. The quality of fuel that complies with the Emission Control Area standard changes over time. The United States has obtained designation for the North American Emission Control Area and the US Caribbean Emission Control Area.

    The brown bag presentation will cover:

    • MARPOL Annex VI standards and emissions benefits in the U.S. upon implementation;
    • General state of play on compliance with Annex VI;
    • Challenges in developing an enforcement program under APPS and current thinking on enforcement procedures/penalties;
    • Working with other federal agencies: e.g Coast Guard, DOJ Admiralty;
    • Building relationships with NOAA, e.g. marine flyovers.

    Note: This seminar is sponsored by the International Section of the NOAA General Counsel Office.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Writing Great Briefing Materials

    Date: Thursday, September 12, 2013 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speaker: Chris Heflin, DOC Director of Performance Excellence

    Presentation Slides (pdf)

    Abstract: Reporting is an important aspect of performance management. Gain insights and tips from our DOC Director of Performance Excellence on developing clear and concise briefing papers.

    The presentation will include the Federal "Plain Language" standards and guidelines for good charts and graphs. "Bad" and "Good" examples will be provided.

    Note: This seminar is sponsored by the NOAA Evaluation Committee.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Progress and Updates on International Shark Conservation through CITES

    Date: Monday, September 16, 2013 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speaker: Angela Somma, NMFS Office of Protected Resources, Endangered Species and Conservation Division

    Abstract: Ms. Somma will provide an update on efforts within the international community to protect sharks by addressing international trade in sharks. Her focus will be on recent developments at the 16th Conference of Parties of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) where the Parties extended protection to five commercially-exploited species of sharks and manta rays. In particular, CITES member nations voted in support of listing the oceanic whitetip shark, three species of hammerhead sharks (scalloped, smooth, and great), the porbeagle shark and manta rays in CITES Appendix II – an action that means increased protection, but still allows legal and sustainable trade. Ms. Somma will discuss U.S. involvement in CITES and how it contributed to the recent listings. Ms. Somma will also discuss how the U.S. is assisting with the implementation of the listings as well as ongoing efforts at the domestic level to manage sharks.

    Note: This seminar is sponsored by the International Section of the NOAA General Counsel Office.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    A Fish Tale: Comparison of the Gut Microbiome of 12 Finfish and 3 Shark Species

    Date: Thursday, September 19, 2013 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speaker: Carrie Givens, Ph.D. Sea Grant Knauss Fellow, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Branch of Aquatic Invasive Species

    Abstract: The fish gut contains a significant bacterial population that can influence fishhealth and physiology. Elevated concentrations of certain bacteria when compared to the composition of the microbial assemblage in the surrounding water suggest that the fish gut provides a unique niche for a select, but diverse, group of bacteria. We used 454-pyrosequencing to survey the 16S rRNA ribotypes in the gut microbiomes of 12 finfish and 3 shark species, selected to encompass a wide range of lifestyles. Each species had a core gut microbiome; however, no individual ribotype was present among all species suggesting that the gut microflora community is adapted to the autecological properties and physiological conditions of each species. Results from manipulation experiments indicate that environmental variables can further affect the gut microbiome composition. We also found that the fish gut can serve as reservoir for the potential pathogens Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus during periods when environmental conditions are less favorable for these bacteria. Fish naturally expel this gut microflora that can then be transferred to other environmental reservoirs, implicating fish in the persistence and dispersal of these potential pathogens.

    Note: This seminar is part of the 2013 Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar Series

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Old Data, New Tricks: A new analysis of Chesapeake Bay Benthic Monitoring Program Data

    Date: Thursday, September 19, 2013 at 12:30pm EDT

    Speaker: Jennifer Bosch, Sea Grant Knauss Fellow, NOAA OAR Laboratories and Cooperative Institutes / Science Advisory Board

    Abstract: An increase in hypoxia is an environmental stressor associated with eutrophic environments that can shift benthic community structures. Chesapeake Bay is a eutrophic estuary where seasonal hypoxia has been increasing since the early 1950's. Utilizing the large dataset of macrofaunal abundance collected by the Chesapeake Bay Benthic Monitoring Program, in conjunction with concurrent measures of environmental parameters, this study examines how environmental conditions regulate the densities of opportunistic polychaetes in this estuarine system. Regression tree CART analysis was used to examine what environmental factors exert the greatest influence on patterns of polychaete abundance during different seasonal time periods. This study supports previous work indicating a shift in the dominant polychaete community to one made up of species known to be extremely adaptable to stressful conditions like hypoxia. Our analysis further shows that the magnitude of these polychaetes response to hypoxia is species specific and dissolved oxygen is the "master variable" controlling longterm trends in this community.

    Note: This seminar is part of the 2013 Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar Series

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    High Seas MPAs: Progress, Politics and Prospects

    Date: Wednesday, November 6, 2013 at 12:00pm EST

    Speaker: Kristina Gjerde, Senior High Seas Policy Advisor, IUCN

    Speaker Bio: Ms. Gjerde is Senior High Seas Advisor to IUCN (the International Union for the Conservation of Nature) and chair of the World Commission on Protected Areas (WCPA) High Seas MPA Specialist Group. A graduate of NYU School of Law, Ms. Gjerde initially practiced shipping law in a Wall Street law firm. For the past 10 years she has worked with IUCN and WCPA to advance the law, science and policy relating to sustaining marine biodiversity beyond national jurisdiction. Recent publications include: “Ocean in Peril: reforming the management of global ocean living resources in areas beyond national jurisdiction” (Marine Pollution Bulletin); “Using the Public Trust Doctrine to Achieve Ocean Stewardship” (Cambridge University Press); and “Challenges to Protecting the Marine Environment beyond National Jurisdiction” (International Journal of Marine and Coastal Law). She is co-founder of the Global Ocean Biodiversity Initiative, the Sargasso Sea Alliance and the High Seas Alliance. The Sargasso Sea Alliance was awarded the International SeaKeepers Prize in September 2013.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Offshore Wind Development

    Date: Thursday, November 14, 2013 at 12:00pm EST

    Speaker: Joan Bondareff, Blank Rome LLP

    Abstract: Ms. Bondareff will discuss the status of offshore wind energy leasing, impediments to offshore wind development, the role of resource agencies, and what's next for offshore wind.

    Note: This seminar is sponsored by the International Section of the NOAA General Counsel Office.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Trophic structure in the Marginal Ice Zone in the Weddell Sea Antarctic

    Date: Thursday, November 21, 2013 at 12:00pm EST

    Speaker: Erica Ombres, NOAA Ocean Acidification Program

    Abstract: Carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) stable isotopes were measured in twenty species spanning four tropic levels from copepod to predatory fish in the marginal ice zone (MIZ) of the Weddell Sea at the beginning of the austral summer. Samples were taken from under the ice, at the ice edge and in the open ocean. A significant trend in the δ13C values of all species was found with the under-ice δ13C values being more depleted than those in the open ocean. This is most likely due to the reduced atmospheric exchange of CO2, upwelled water with depleted δ13C values, and continuous biological respiration under the ice, all of which contribute to very depleted δ13C values. δ15N values were significantly lower in the open ocean than the other ice conditions due to the increased reliance on primary production. Cluster analysis revealed trophic shifts between the different ice zones. The ice edge zone proved to contain the most species and was the best habitat for most species. The trophic shifts observed within species in the differing ice conditions mimicked the seasonal changes they undergo during the course of the productive season every year.

    Note: This seminar is part of the 2013 Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar Series

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Incubation temperature effects on hatchling performance in the loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta)

    Date: Thursday, November 21, 2013 at 12:30pm EST

    Speaker: Leah Fisher, NOAA's Ocean Service: Policy, Planning & Analysis Division

    Abstract: Incubation temperature has significant developmental effects on oviparous animals, including determining sex for several species. It has been observed that incubation temperature also affects traits that can influence survival, a theory that is tested in this study for the Northwest Atlantic loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta). We conducted the first controlled laboratory incubation and experiments to test for an effect of incubation temperature on performance of loggerhead hatchlings. Ninety-nine hatchlings were tested produced from eggs incubated at 11 constant temperatures ranging from ~27°C to ~33°C. Following emergence from the eggs, we tested righting response, crawling speed, and conducted a 24-hour long hatchling swim test. Data indicate an effect of incubation temperature on survivorship, righting response time, crawling speed, change in crawl speed, and overall swim activity, with hatchlings incubated at 27°C showing decreased locomotor abilities. No hatchlings survived in both years when incubated at 32°C and above. Differences in survivorship of hatchlings incubated at high temperatures are important in light of projected higher sand temperatures due to climate change, and could indicate increased mortality from incubation temperature effects.

    Note: This seminar is part of the 2013 Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar Series

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    China's Distant Water Fishing Fleet

    Date: Tuesday, December 3, 2013 at 12:00pm EST

    Speaker: Tabitha Mallory, Princeton University

    Abstract: China is the world's largest producer of seafood, producing over a third of the world's wild marine catch in 2011, according to FAO statistics. As marine fish stocks come under increasing pressure, China's distant water fishing activities are becoming ever-more significant in sustainably managing world supplies of seafood. These activities also have effects on various geo-political, legal, military, and other issues.

    In this talk, Dr. Tabitha Mallory (Princeton-Harvard China and the World Program) will explore drivers of China's distant water fishing activities, examine how China might manage its fleet in coming years, and encourage discussion of management and engagement strategies with China.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Fishery Management and Information Sharing Networks: The Association between Sector Management and Social Capital

    Date: Thursday, December 5, 2013 at 12:00pm EST

    Speaker: Gabe Dunham, NOAA, OAR, Sea Grant

    Presentation Slides (pdf)

    Abstract: The benefits from increased levels of social capital have been shown to manifest themselves in ways that can increase the efficiency of the use and regulation of natural resources, as well as increase the resiliency of resource dependent communities against fluctuations in abundance. While the literature shows evidence of the positive effects that social capital can have on management and stakeholder institutions, few studies examine the effects of changes in management on levels of social capital in commercial fisheries. This study employs network and econometric analyses to examine social capital in the Northeast multispecies groundfish fishery. We compare alternative measurements of social capital, and find suggestive evidence of decreased levels of social capital associated with a recent change from effort-based to rights-based management. Increased knowledge of this relationship may provide tangible benefits to both management institutions and resource users.

    Note: This seminar is part of the 2013 Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar Series

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Plastic pollution in the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre

    Date: Thursday, December 5, 2013 at 12:30pm EST

    Speaker: Miriam Goldstein, California Sea Grant

    Presentation Slides (pdf)

    Abstract: Parts of the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre, a remote area nestled between the trade winds and the westerlies, have been dubbed the “Great Pacific Garbage Patch.” Plastic pollution was first detected in this area in the early 1970s and has since become a matter of scientific and public concern. Relatively little is known about the consequences of plastic debris in the NPSG, but since most of the debris is in the form of small particles (<5 mm in diameter) on the ocean's surface, surface-dwelling biota are most likely to be impacted. I will discuss the abundance, distribution, and size of the plastic debris, as well as how plastic is interacting with pelagic invertebrates. Impacts to marine life include direct ingestion, increased surface area for oviposition, and the transportation of nonindigenous species.

    Note: This seminar is part of the 2013 Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar Series

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    International Space University's 2013 Team Project “KOASTAL”: Kenyan coast Observations through Affordable Space Technology AppLications

    Date: Monday, December 9, 2013 at 12:00pm EST

    Speakers: Steve Brody, Vice President for North American Operations, International Space University; and Charlotte Kiang, software engineer, Boeing Defense Systems

    Presentation Slides (pdf)

    Abstract: During the summer of 2013, 30 professionals from 12 countries participating in the International Space University's (ISU's) nine-week Space Studies Program undertook Team Project KOASTAL to address problems related to marine and terrestrial water pollution along the Kenyan coast.

    Such water pollution threatens to destroy the coastal ecosystem's natural balance, and affects people living along the coast as their health, food supplies, and income are endangered.

    The team members were individuals from a diverse set of academic and professional backgrounds, allowing for a fully interdisciplinary, as well as international, examination of the socioeconomic, environmental, technical, and policy issues and challenges related to the integrated management of coastal ecosystems in Kenya.

    The project team researched information derived from interactions with various experts, including those of the SERVIR project, a joint NASA-USAID venture that taps satellite-based Earth observation data and science applications to help developing nations.

    Project KOASTAL's solution is an integrated water pollution management and livelihood support system using marine, ground, and space sensors to supply data to state authorities in Kenya.

    This presentation will detail the findings and recommendations of the project, encompassing an integrated three-step process including detection, response, and regulation of water pollution. The process includes the issuance of alerts and warnings, and uses existing collection and communication systems to ensure a cost-effective approach to the maximum extent possible.

    Policy, law, and education and outreach recommendations are also included to inform and engage all members of the affected areas and their elected officials, with the hope that Project KOASTAL's effort could help improve and protect the lives of those in the coastal regions of Kenya.

    This project was sponsored by NASA (Earth Science Division's Applied Sciences Program and Office of the Chief Scientist).

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Ammonium cycling in the rocky intertidal: remineralization, removal and retention

    Date: Thursday, December 12, 2013 at 12:00pm EST

    Speaker: Santhiska Pather, US Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water, Office of Science and Technology

    Presentation Slides (pdf)

    Abstract: Rocky intertidal productivity is traditionally thought to be sustained almost solely by upwelled nitrate with remineralized forms of minor importance. Using tidepools as natural experimental mesocosms, we conducted 15N tracer experiments to test whether ammonium remineralized within the rocky intertidal is also a significant source of fixed N to localized ecosystem production. Comparison of tidepools with and without the dominant bivalve, Mytilus californianus, allowed consideration of its role in NH4+ cycling. Closed water incubation bottles were used to investigate the contribution of suspended microbes to NH4+ cycling. Tidepools with mussels had both greater NH4+ remineralization (two times) and NH4+ removal as compared to those without, with daytime rates greater than nighttime rates. Incorporation of 15NH4+ tracer by particulate organic matter and macroalgae, and the persistence of this signal in tidepools for several days following the experiment, showed retention of autochthonous NH4+ in the system. Remineralization rates were tightly correlated to removal rates when compared over all treatments and experiments, but NH4+ remineralization was significantly greater than removal, suggesting a surplus available to nearshore primary producers.

    Note: This seminar is part of the 2013 Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar Series

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    The Value of Communicating Science: Lessons from the Knauss Fellowship

    Date: Thursday, December 12, 2013 at 12:30pm EST

    Abstract: As scientists in varying fields of research and academia, there is a significant emphasis placed on peer-reviewed publications and sometimes a disregard for the value of making those results available to the broader non-scientific community. The fact is that more and more scientists and government agencies alike are embracing the power of social and digital media to reach a variety of audiences by translating technical findings into plain language, and making the results more relatable to the public. In doing so, a community and other stakeholders will grow not only to understand the benefits of scientific endeavors but to share their support for these fields of research. In my year as the Knauss Communications Fellow within NOAA’s Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research, my eyes have been opened to many possibilities for promoting research in social media, and I have learned the power of sharing science through story-telling, and I hope to pass it along

    Note: This seminar is part of the 2013 Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar Series

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Changing vessel routes to open areas for offshore wind development could generate significant societal benefits

    Date: Thursday, December 19, 2013 at 12:00pm EST

    Speaker: Katya Samoteskul , NOAA OAR Climate Program Office

    Abstract: As wind energy development becomes more prevalent, existing users of the oceans, such as commercial shippers, will be compelled to share their historically open-access waters with these projects. To assess tradeoffs between offshore wind development and commercial shipping, we demonstrate the utility of using cost-benefit analysis (CBA) framework. Specifically, we evaluate whether rerouting commercial vessel traffic farther from shore to open areas for wind development would produce societal benefits. We focus on less than 1,500 transits by deep-craft vessels between the ports in the US Mid-Atlantic. We propose to reroute the ships by an average of 18.5 km per trip. We estimate that over 29 years of the study, the net benefits of the proposed policy are approximately $14 billion (in 2012$). Considering the large societal benefits, changing vessel routes needs to be included in the portfolio of policies used to support the launch of the offshore wind industry.

    Note: This seminar is part of the 2013 Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar Series

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Influence of predator identity on the strength of predator avoidance response in lobster

    Date: Thursday, December 19, 2013 at 12:30pm EST

    Speaker: Erin Wilkinson, NOAA NMFS Office of Sustainable Fisheries, Domestic Fisheries Division

    Abstract: The American lobster, Homarus americanus, is an important benthic consumer in the Gulf of Maine and supports an extremely valuable fishery in New England. There is substantial interest in restoring large predatory fish species to the Gulf of Maine, and these predators may impact lobster populations through consumptive and behavioral effects that are likely to vary with size. Tethering experiments were used to examine the susceptibility of lobster size classes to predation in Saco Bay, Maine. The most susceptible sizes of lobster were then exposed to fish predators (Atlantic striped bass, Atlantic cod, and sea raven) separately in experimental mesocosm tanks. Juvenile lobster moved less and spent more time sheltered in the presence of cod or sea raven, but did not alter behavior in presence of striped bass. These predator-induced behavior changes can result in less foraging activity, which may translate into reduced growth and reproduction. Including these behavioral effects into population and ecosystem models will enhance our ability to understand and manage fisheries species.

    Note: This seminar is part of the 2013 Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar Series

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    2014 Brown Bags

    Introduction to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA): Compliance at NOAA

    Date: Wednesday, January 15, 2014 at 12:00pm EST

    Speaker: Jay Nunenkamp, NEPA Policy and Training Coordinator, NOAA Office of Program Planning and Integration

    Presentation Slides (pdf)

    Abstract: Mr. Nunenkamp will outline the basic requirements of NEPA and explain how they relate to the NOAA mission.

    Note: This is part 1 of the NEPA Brown Bag Series sponsored by NOAA's Office of Program Planning and Integration (PPI)

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Measuring at relevant scales: how whelks respond to differing prey levels across regions and years

    Date: Monday, January 27, 2014 at 12:00 EST

    Speaker: Will Tyburczy, NOAA Office of Policy, Planning and Integration

    Presentation Slides (pdf)

    Abstract: Many multi-species models assume that the reproduction and mortality of predators relate directly to their immediate feeding rate and local prey abundance. Similarly, many empirical investigations measure short-term feeding rates of predators and extrapolate reproductive consequences. However, for annually reproducing species, where predation and reproduction occur on very different timescales, the validity of these assumptions remains in question. From 2009-2012, I measured growth, survival, and reproduction of the predatory whelk, Nucella ostrina, both in caged manipulations across Oregon and Washington, and in naturally isolated populations in Washington. Whelks were exposed to a range of prey abundances. Analysis revealed an effect of barnacle abundance on whelk growth, and a correlation between growth and reproduction, but showed no discernable relationship between barnacle abundance and whelk reproduction. A literature search also revealed large regional variation N. ostrina survival rates. The results demonstrate the value of conducting research at larger spatial and temporal scales.

    Note: This seminar is part of the 2013 Sea Grant Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar Series

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    The Antarctic Whaling Case at the International Court of Justice

    Date: Tuesday, January 28, 2014 at 12:00pm EST

    Speaker: Roger Eckert, Attorney-Advisor, NOAA Office of General Counsel Fisheries and Protected Resources Section

    Presentation Slides (pdf)

    Abstract: Mr. Eckert will discuss the current dispute between Australia and Japan at the International Court of Justice regarding Japan's ongoing Antarctic whaling activities. His focus will be on the history of Antarctic whaling, efforts to manage commercial whaling by the International Whaling Commission (IWC), and interpretation of the scientific research provision of the International Convention for the Regulation of Whaling. At the heart of this case is whether Japan's whaling in the IWC's Southern Ocean Sanctuary is a scientific research program.

    Note: This seminar is sponsored by the International Section of the NOAA Office of General Counsel.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Articulating Conservation Outcomes for Citizen Science: Emerging Principles and Practices for the 21st Century

    Date: Wednesday, January 29, 2014 at 12:00pm EST

    Speaker: Tina Phillips, Cornell University Lab of Ornithology

    Presentation Slides (pdf)

    Abstract: The field of conservation biology has tremendous potential to advance the science and practice of conserving the Earth's biological diversity. As funding for environmental organizations continues to decline, citizen science, or public participation in scientific research (PPSR) is increasingly being used as collaborative method between scientists and the public to advance our understanding of natural systems (Dickinson and Bonney 2012). Citizen science exists in many forms, from local, community-driven efforts, to large-scale, institutional projects that span the globe. Few projects, however have evaluated outcomes beyond program output and individual learning (Jordan et al. 2012). Here I report on emerging efforts, exemplar cases, and promising practices for documenting conservation outcomes across citizen science, which in addition to site and species management, can include education, research, policy, and community outcomes. I will also share results from a focus group involving leaders in conservation, citizen science, and evaluation, resulting in the articulation of diverse pathways that lead to conservation outcomes.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    A Strategy to Decarbonize US Energy by the 2030s

    Date: Thursday, January 30, 2014 at 12:00pm EST

    Speaker: Alexander E. MacDonald, OAR Chief Science Advisor and Director, Earth System Research Laboratory

    Abstract: Wind and solar power generation could provide societal benefits including climate change mitigation, but are subject to the variability of weather. A study was conducted over the US contiguous states to determine the geographic characteristics of wind and solar energy systems, augmented by natural gas plants and power transmission. The study used high-spatial and temporal-resolution weather data from 2006 to 2008 and electric demand data projected to 2030 to determine cost-optimal wind, solar, and natural gas plant configurations for domains of various sizes. It is shown that wind and solar energy penetration is maximized and total atmospheric carbon release and system costs are minimized by using the largest domain. Using achievable cost estimates for wind and solar energy, the study indicates that the crucial element of the transition is the implementation of a national HVDC power transmission system. Such a transition could be accomplished without an increase of electric costs, and would reduce carbon dioxide emissions by about 90% compared to the 2010 mix.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Ocean Health Index

    Date: Friday, January 31, 2014 at 12:00pm EST

    Speaker: Sebastian Troëng, Senior Vice President and Managing Director, Betty and Gordon Moore Center for Science and Oceans, Conservation International

    Abstract: The Ocean Health Index is the first assessment tool that scientifically compares and combines key elements from all dimensions of the oceans' health - biological, physical, economic and social - to measure how sustainably people are using the ocean. It builds upon a definition of a healthy ocean as one that provides a range of benefits to people, both now and in the future and it provides scores for ten public goals for the ocean including food provision, coastal protection, carbon storage, coastal livelihoods and economies and others. The detailed Index methodology was developed by a large group of scientists and organizations, and published in the journal Nature in 2012 (Halpern et al. 2012). Updated Ocean Health Index scores for 221 Exclusive Economic Zones and territories were released in October 2013 (http://www.oceanhealthindex.org). Already, the Index has been endorsed by the World Economic Forum and adopted by China, Colombia and the ecosystem assessment program in Israel where the Index methodology is now being applied at a national scale.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Research Libraries and Open Access: Issues and Actions

    Date: Monday, February 10, 2014 at 12:00pm EST

    Speaker: Julia Blixrud, Association of Research Libraries

    Presentation slides (pdf)

    Abstract: The goal of this briefing is to inform NOAA employees about open access issues and what the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) is doing on this topic. Open access is one component of open scholarship, which also includes open data and open educational resources. Open access means free availability of literature on the public internet, with the only constraint on reproduction and distribution being to give authors control over the integrity of their work and the right to be properly acknowledged and cited. ARL works with other organizations to advocate for policies and legislation to make the results of federally funded research freely accessible. One bill under consideration is the Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), which would build upon the directives in the February 2013 OSTP memo on increasing public access to research results.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    A Bibliometric Analysis of Climate Engineering Research

    Date: Tuesday, February 18, 2014 at 12:00pm EST

    Speaker: Chris Belter, LAC Group, NOAA Central Library

    Abstract: Over the past few years, climate engineering, also referred to as geoengineering, has become a widely discussed option for mitigating the effects of climate change. Given the increasing visibility of climate engineering proposals, it can be useful to examine both how much scientific research has been done on the topic and by whom it has been performed. Bibliometric analysis - the scientific study of scientific publications - offers methods and tools for quantitatively addressing such questions. In this presentation, I will summarize the results of a bibliometric analysis performed on scientific articles about climate engineering published between 1984 and 2012. I will address such topics as the number of articles published per year, the geographic distribution of article publication, the number of publications per proposal (ocean fertilization, solar radiation management, removal of CO2 from the atmosphere, etc), and the amount of collaboration between authors. These results can inform discussions about climate engineering and potentially guide future research on the topic.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Worldwide Health Effects of the Fukushima Nuclear Accident

    Date: Thursday, February 20, 2014 at 12:00pm EST

    Speaker: John Ten Hoeve, NOAA Presidential Management Fellow

    Abstract: There has been renewed public interest in radioactivity from the Fukushima nuclear accident, as evidenced by recent news articles. Viral YouTube videos have suggested that radiation from Fukushima is detectable with a Geiger counter along the U.S. West Coast. In this talk, I will present results from a 2012 study on the worldwide dispersion of radioactivity and the resulting impact to human health from Fukushima. This study represents the first published estimation of health effects from the accident through inhalation and exposure pathways using a linear no-threshold model of human exposure. Exposure due to ingestion of contaminated food and water is estimated by extrapolation. Emissions are estimated from independent Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) observations. We estimate an additional 130 (15-1100) cancer-related mortalities and 180 (24-1800) cancer-related morbidities incorporating uncertainties associated with the exposure - dose and dose - response models used in the study. Sensitivities to emission rates, gas to particulate I-131 partitioning, and the mandatory evacuation radius around the plant are also explored, and may increase upper bound mortalities and morbidities in the ranges above to 1300 and 2500, respectively. Finally, I will discuss the validity of recent claims that significant radiation has reached the U.S. West Coast.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Shipwreck Litigation: The Law, Policy, and Regulation of Davy Jones' Locker

    Date: Wednesday, February 26, 2014 at 12:00pm EST

    Speaker: Kyle Jones, Law Fellow, International Section of NOAA's Office of General Counsel

    Abstract: Join Kyle Jones, a Law Fellow in the International Section of NOAA's Office of General Counsel, for a fascinating look at the little-known field of shipwreck litigation. Mr. Jones will begin by recounting the development of shipwreck law generally, and will touch upon several famous high-stakes legal battles over some of the world's most notable shipwrecks (and their associated treasures). He will then discuss one salvor's ongoing efforts to recover an unidentified wreck in the Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary, the environmental and cultural harm that can result from unrestricted shipwreck excavation, and NOAA's efforts to regulate shipwreck recovery via an array of centuries-old laws. No law degree is required to enjoy this talk. Just an interest in responsible stewardship of our environmental and cultural resources.

    Note: This seminar is sponsored by the International Section of the NOAA General Counsel Office.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Evaluation for a Sustainable Future

    Date: Thursday, February 27, 2014 at 9:30am EST

    Speakers: Matt Keene, US Environmental Protection Agency and 2014 Program Chair, American Evaluation Association; and Beverly Parsons, Executive Director, InSites, and 2014 President, American Evaluation Association

    Abstract: The concept of sustainability is becoming kind of a big deal. In the global evaluation community there are indications that it will emerge as top priority for evaluation practice, research and policy over the next few years. For example, the 2014 theme of the American Evaluation Association (AEA), under the leadership of AEA President Beverly Parsons, is Visionary Evaluation for a Sustainable and Equitable Future. Complementary to the AEA 2014 theme, sustainability is also emphasized in the themes of the European Evaluation Society (2014), Environmental Evaluators Network (EEN) Pacific Forum (2013), European EEN (2014), and the International Year of Evaluation (2015). Through creative facilitated discussion (read no PPT and perhaps liberatingstructures.com), we'll discuss the relevance of the AEA 2014 theme, including its emphasis on systems thinking and relationships, to evaluation at NOAA and the environmental sector at large. The purposes of our discussion will be to: 1) stimulate conversations that elucidate connections and obstacles between evaluation and sustainability, particularly from the viewpoint of environmental agencies, and 2) generate practical next steps that will help to dismantle obstacles and clarify and strengthen those connections. If you are making dark chocolate truffles or pecan pie with gluten free crust on the morning of our get together, feel free to bring some along.

    Note: This seminar is part of the NOAA Evaluation Training and Capacity Building Subcommittee Series

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Why the United States Should Join the Agreement on the Conservation of Albatrosses and Petrels

    Date: Thursday, February 27, 2014 at 12:00pm EST

    Speaker: Warren Papworth, Secretariat of the Agreement on the Conservation of Albatrosses and Petrels.

    Abstract: The U.S. has played an active role in the work of the Agreement on the Conservation of Albatrosses and Petrels (ACAP), participating in all of the preparatory meetings to negotiate the Agreement, as well as all the subsequent meetings held once the Agreement came into force in 2004. Although President Bush transmitted the Agreement in 2008 (pdf) to the Senate for its advice and consent to accession, and the Departments of Commerce and the Interior submitted OMB-cleared proposed implementing legislation to Congress in 2009 (pdf), the United States has not yet become a party.

    Fifteen of the 22 species of albatrosses are threatened with extinction, primarily due to high levels of mortality resulting from their bycatch in fishing operations. Albatrosses are highly migratory species, with many having a circumpolar foraging range. Consequently, it is not possible for one country alone to address this key threat, as it occurs not only in their territorial waters, but also on the high seas and in the territorial waters of other States. It was for this reason that ACAP was established - to coordinate international action to address this threat.

    The United States is a breeding Range State to the Agreement, having jurisdiction over the breeding sites for three species of albatrosses. In his presentation, Mr. Papworth will explain that the United States should join ACAP because it has demonstrated that it is an effective international organisation that has been successful in achieving conservation measures that will protect albatrosses outside the United States' jurisdiction e.g. in fisheries managed by regional fisheries management organizations (RFMOs) such as the Western and Central Pacific Fisheries Commission.

    Note: This seminar is sponsored by the International Section of the NOAA Office of General Counsel.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Parallels: Lewis and Clark and the United States Coast and Geodetic Survey

    Date: Wednesday, March 5, 2014 at 12:00pm EST

    Speaker: Albert “Skip” Theberge, NOAA Central Library

    Presentation Slides (pdf)

    Abstract: Both the Lewis and Clark Expedition and the United States Coast and Geodetic Survey had their roots in the administration of President Thomas Jefferson. Although, there is no direct connection between the two endeavors, there are surprising parallels in their mission and experiences: both had primary goals to map significant portions of our Nation; both had maritime goals - Lewis and Clark to find water communication between Atlantic and Pacific coasts - the C&GS to chart our Nation's waterways; both had expert boatmen; and both were confronted with the rugged Rocky Mountains - Lewis and Clark to pass over - the C&GS to establish primary land survey control. This presentation explores these connections as well as the parallels in the leadership and accomplishments of some of the primary personalities involved.

    Note: This seminar is the first of a NOAA History Roundtable Seminar Series. There will be a short discussion following the main seminar concerning development of a NOAA History Roundtable discussion group. The goals as presently formulated are:

    1. Provide an opportunity for interested parties to share knowledge of recent NOAA History and Heritage including such matters as evolution of influential ideas and history of laboratories and programs within the NOAA of today.
    2. Foster further awareness and understanding of the role of ancestor agencies in molding the NOAA science and policy of today.
    3. Foster further awareness of NOAA Heritage materials and artifacts and their power in telling the NOAA story.

    To further these goals, it is hoped that both active and retired NOAA personnel will participate and share their knowledge. To date a number of presenters have agreed to make presentations at dates to be determined.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Retrospective analysis of U.S. Endangered Species Act listing decisions reveals consistent standards for extinction risk

    Date: Tuesday, March 11, 2014 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speaker: Charlotte Boyd and Barbara Taylor, NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center

    Abstract: The Endangered Species Act (ESA) provides for the conservation of endangered and threatened species in the United States. The ESA is a powerful act - it is therefore important that listing decisions are seen to be objective, consistent, and scientifically and legally defensible. The Act defines ‘endangered’ and ‘threatened’, but does not provide specific guidance on how these definitions should be interpreted. While the two implementing agencies, the Fish & Wildlife Service and the National Marine Fisheries Service, have worked to clarify various terms and establish clear procedures, the lack of clear decision rules for mapping levels of extinction risk to endangered, threatened, or not warranted decisions leaves decision-making open to costly legal challenges. The purpose of the research presented here was to assess whether past listing decisions could be used to inform a set of standards to guide future listing decisions. We found that relatively simple decision rules based on quantitative analysis of extinction risks correspond well to actual listing decisions based on in-depth status reviews for a wide range of marine and anadromous species. We compare several such decision rules and consider how these rules compare with the Ashe memorandum, developed by the FWS to respond to their decision making regarding whether a species should be listed as threatened or endangered, and the IUCN rules employed by Canada and many nations sharing these highly mobile marine species. Using standards based on past listing decisions as reference points for future decisions would promote consistency and transparency while allowing for arguments to be made for exceptions to those standards needed to accommodate the full range of factors that may contribute to endangered or threatened status.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Some considerations for communicating uncertainty information in severe weather warnings

    Date:TO BE RESCHEDULED (orignally scheduled for Wednesday, March 19, 2014 at 12:00pm EDT)

    Speaker: Kim Klockow, AMS/UCAR Congressional Science Fellow, American Association for the Advancement of Science

    Abstract: This seminar will provide an overview of some potential opportunities and challenges with communicating uncertainty information, specifically in severe weather warnings. The presentation will highlight key findings from a set of decision experiments conducted using a large (n = 5564) sample of the U.S. public. In the experiment, each participant was presented with different graphical and verbal representations of tornado risk, and they made response choices at various distances to a series of fictitious storms. They also answered questions about their preferences for uncertainty information in various formats, which can be compared to their performance in the experiments, numeracy, and socio-demographic information.

    Using this spatial decision setting, several effects became apparent: people inferred uncertainty into deterministic information based on distance; lengthening deterministic warnings caused people closer to the storm to perceive less risk, while people farther from the storm perceived more; simple verbal guidance and explicit estimates of uncertainty both improved decisions in our simulated task; and finally, map design influenced the perception of risk – specifically, using cool colors made people perceive less risk. Implications of findings for warning practice and future research will be discussed.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Linking Northeast Pacific recruitment synchrony to environmental variability

    Date: Thursday, March 20, 2014 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speaker: Megan Stachura, Domestic Fisheries Division, NMFS Office of Sustainable Fisheries

    Presentation Slides (pdf format)

    Abstract: We investigated the hypothesis that synchronous recruitment is due to a shared susceptibility to environmental processes using stock-recruitment residuals for 52 marine fish stocks within three Northeast Pacific large marine ecosystems: the Eastern Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands, Gulf of Alaska, and California Current. There was moderate coherence in exceptionally strong and weak year classes and correlations across stocks. Based on evidence of synchrony from these analyses, we used Bayesian hierarchical models to relate recruitment to environmental covariates for groups of stocks that may be similarly influenced by environmental processes based on their life histories. There were consistent relationships among stocks to the covariates, especially within the Gulf of Alaska and California Current. This presentation will focus on the results from the Gulf of Alaska. The best Gulf of Alaska model included Northeast Pacific sea surface height as a predictor of recruitment, and was particularly strong for stocks dependent on cross-shelf transport during the larval phase for recruitment. Future research may be able to utilize these across-stock environmental influences, in conjunction with an understanding of ecological processes important across early life history stages, to improve identification of environmental drivers of recruitment.

    Note: This seminar is part of the 2014 Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar series.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    The International Trade and Fishery Management of Spiny dogfish (Squalus Acanthias) in Light of CITES List Insertion: A Social Network Analysis

    Date: Thursday, March 20, 2014 at 12:30pm EDT

    Speaker: Andrea Dell’Apa, Healthy Oceans Goal Analyst, Office of Management and Budget

    Presentation Slides (pdf format)

    Abstract: The spiny dogfish (Squalus acanthias) is an important commercial shark species, with recent concerns over its conservation status. The major demand for its meat is from the EU market, with the U.S. and Canada as its two major contributors. The U.S. has yet to support a spiny dogfish listing in the CITES Appendix II, although the U.S. Atlantic stock is under a fishery management plan (FMP) that helped to provide a certified sustainable fishery. A cumulative sum technique was employed to compare trade data for spiny dogfish export from U.S. and Canada to the EU in relation to the FMP adoption. Also, a social network was constructed to visualize changes in the European trade for spiny dogfish after adoption of the FMP and to predict future trade flow potentially affecting the conservation status of regional dogfish stocks in relation to recent management measures introduced in Europe. The social network analysis revealed that the exclusion of spiny dogfish from Appendix II will eventually affect the conservation status of dogfish stocks in Africa, Asia, South America, and the Mediterranean and Black Seas. Results from this study suggest that the species listing would provide an economic benefit for the U.S. Atlantic fishery, and will potentially foster the conservation status of other regional spiny dogfish stocks worldwide.

    Note: This seminar is part of the 2014 Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar series.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Productivity and resilience: long-term trends, seasonal variability, and event-driven changes to the plant community of the accreting Wax Lake Delta

    Date: Thursday, April 17, 2014 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speaker: Melissa Carle

    Abstract: River deltas are dynamic depositional environments that are controlled to varying degrees by coastal and fluvial forces. Plant communities in deltas respond to many of the same allogenic forces that shape delta geomorphology. This study examines long-term trends, seasonal variability, and storm and flood event-driven changes in the plant community of the Wax Lake delta, a young, actively accreting river delta in coastal Louisiana, USA. A vegetation index (NDVI) calculated from a time series of 94 Landsat MSS and TM images was used to assess the long-term trends, seasonal fluctuations, and storm-event driven changes in plant community productivity within the delta. Analysis of peak growing season NDVI from 1975 to 2011 indicates that both total and mean (per unit area) NDVI in the delta have increased over time and that seasonal fluctuations occur that are related to water temperature and discharge. Comparison of NDVI data from before and after major storm events shows that storms passing directly over or to the west of the delta have a significant short-term impact on the plant community, most likely as a result of salt-water intrusion associated with storm surges. However, in each case, NDVI values recovered to within the 95 percent prediction interval for the long-term trend by the following growing season. Additionally, a combination of WorldView-2 and Land Satellite 5 Thematic Mapper imagery was used to assess the impact of the 2011 Mississippi River flood on the Wax Lake Delta. Vegetation community change was mapped from 2010 to 2011 and related to elevation change using plant species elevation distributions calculated from light detection and ranging (LIDAR) data. Changes in the land area in the delta were also assessed by regressing land area against water level for a series of pre- and post-flood Landsat 5 TM images. The results indicate a net growth of the areal footprint of the delta of approximately 5 km2 at mean sea level following this important flood event. Areal gains were greatest at high water levels, indicating substantial vertical accretion occurred across the subaerial delta. In addition, conversion from lower to higher elevation species was observed over at least 8.7 km2, or 31.8%, of the area studied. Overall, these results indicate that the plant community in the Wax Lake delta is increasing in productivity as the delta matures and continues to accrete both vertically and horizontally over time. The marshes in the delta show great resilience to storm disturbance, and a strong response to allogenic succession driven by extreme flood events. As the Wax Lake delta is essentially the product of an unmanaged river diversion, its productivity and resilience have important implications for large-scale diversions that have proposed to restore marshes elsewhere in the Mississippi River deltaic plain.

    Note: This seminar is part of the 2014 Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar series.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Measuring Cetacean Responses to Military Sonar: Southern California Behavioral Response Study (SOCAL:BRS)

    Date: Thursday, May 1, 2014 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speaker: Brandon L. Southall, SEA, Inc., University of California, Santa Cruz, Duke University

    Presentation Slides (pdf format)

    Abstract: SOCAL-­-BRS is a multi-­-team collaboration designed to increase understanding of marine mammal behavior and provide a more robust scientific basis for estimating risk and minimizing effects of active, mid-­-frequency military sonar systems. The research team includes interdisciplinary expertise in marine mammal biology, behavior, and communication, as well as underwater acoustics, engineering, and biostatistics. Four field seasons were conducted involving visual observations, passive acoustic monitoring, animal-­-attached acoustic and movement tags, photo ID, biopsy, and controlled sound exposure methods on over 20 cetacean species in biologically important areas throughout the southern California Bight. A total of 137 individuals of ten species were tagged with six tag types, including several [Baird’s beaked whale (Berardius bairdii), Risso’s dolphin (Grampus griseus)] that had not been previously studied using such monitoring tools. Seventy-­-six controlled sound exposure experiments were conducted using specific protocols and protective measures to ensure animals were not harmed. Several sound types, including simulated military sonar, were projected through a deployed sound source from a research vessel and changes in vocal, diving, and horizontal movement behavior were measured. Additionally, in 2013 realistic mid-­-frequency active sonar from operational Navy vessels conducting routine training was integrated into SOCAL-­-BRS CEEs. Received levels on tagged animals were controlled to match (quite well) those from simulated sonar CEEs using in situ sound propagation modeling to position Navy vessels. Results to date indicate that Cuvier’s beaked whales (Ziphius cavirostris) react most strongly to simulated sonar exposures with clear changes in vocal and diving behavior indicating avoidance responses at low received sound levels. Blue whale (Balaenoptera musculus) responses are more variable and depend on complex interactions of exposure conditions and individual behavioral state. Ongoing efforts include expanding sample sizes in other species using simulated sounds and with a strong emphasis on the use of operational Navy mid-­-frequency sonar systems to investigate the role of source proximity and exposure context on the type and nature of potential responses across species.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Stop the Presses: Leveraging News and Company Information with Nexis

    Date: Wednesday, May 14, 2014 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speakers: Karen DeLong (LexisNexis Group-HBE), Chris Vestal (LexisNexis Group-HBE), Mary Lou Cumberpatch, NOAA Central Library

    Abstract: This Brown Bag seminar will highlight the rich sources of information available through Nexis.com. You will learn how to search for full-text newspapers, magazines, reports, and newsletters including the Washington Post, Time magazine, Harvard Business Review, The Atlantic, PC Magazine, Popular Science, and hundreds more news sources; vet companies or people with public records and news resources to mitigate supply chain risks; set up News alerts to monitor the latest developments in your subject area; conduct company and industry research; and find specific concepts or people using advanced subject indexing. Nexis is available NOAA-wide from your NOAA Library.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Lessons Learned from Eight Years as NOAA Administrator

    Date: Thursday, May 15, 2014 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speaker: D. James Baker, former NOAA Administrator

    Abstract: Join Dr. D. James Baker, NOAA's seventh administrator, as he reflects on eight years as NOAA Administrator. Dr. Baker served as NOAA Administrator during the administration of President Clinton, from May 1993 until January 2001

    Note: This seminar is part of the NOAA History Roundtable Brown Bag Seminar series.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    The Coast Survey - The Early Years 1807-1860.

    Date: Wednesday, May 21, 2014 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speaker: Albert Theberge of the NOAA Central Library. He will present a series of seminars on the history of NOAA's oldest ancestor agency, the Coast Survey

    Abstract: TBD

    Note: This seminar is part of the NOAA History Roundtable Brown Bag Seminar series.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Fungicide alters community and disease dynamics in an aquatic ecosystem

    Date: Thursday, May 22, 2014 at 12:00 noon EDT

    Speaker: Shane Hanlon, Division of Congressional and Legislative Affairs, Department of the Interior, Fish and Wildlife Service

    Abstract: Chytridiomycosis, an emerging infectious amphibian disease caused by the pathogenic fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, has played a major role in amphibian declines. Studies have also shown that widespread pesticide use contributes to declines in amphibian health. Because these causes are not mutually exclusive, studies must examine the effects of multiple concurrent perturbations on amphibian declines. We conducted field studies to determine the interactive effects of the fungicide thiophanate-methyl (TM; at 3 concentrations) and Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis in southern leopard frog (Lithobates sphenocephalus) tadpoles. In the field, we replicated similar treatments in aquatic mesocosms prepared to simulate aquatic communities. Tadpoles were added to the mesocosms after hatching, frogs were collected upon metamorphosis, and measures of survival or growth were assessed. We also recorded aquatic community measures to assess the effects of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis and TM on aquatic community composition. Based on previous studies, we predicted that Bd and TM would act in opposition to directly affect amphibian health, while TM would alter aquaticcommunity composition, possibly negating the direct effects of either pressure on the amphibians. Counter to our predictions, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis mitigated the effects of TM by "protecting" tadpoles from TM-induced mortality, and both Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis and TM altered aquatic community composition. However, we conclude that alterations to the measured aquatic community variables were not the cause of tadpole mortality, as has been recorded in previous studies. Our research illustrates that interactions between pesticides and pathogens impact amphibian health and aquatic community composition.

     

    Note: This seminar is part of the 2014 Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar series.


    Temporal patterns in fishing effort: using multilevel methods to explore the changes in time allocation according to the lunar cycle of a small-scale fishery in eastern Indonesia. Is socio-environmental variability redefining fishing profiles?

    Date:Thursday, May 22, 2014 at 12:30 pm EDT

    Speaker: Victoria Ramenzoni, NOAA Office of Program Planning and Integration

    Abstract: The study of fishing behavior is central to the design of effective harvesting policies. Looking at the changes in the time spent fishing during the traditional lunar calendar; this research explored how environmental uncertainty is affecting patterns of effort in an artisanal tuna fishery in Eastern Indonesia. It relied on a combination of standard statistical approaches, multilevel models, and discrimination analysis applied to long-term repeated observations of fishing events (n: 2633). Results permitted to generate three fishing profiles that might explain the time spent fishing: generalist, conservative and opportunistic. Findings challenge previous research of the effect of the lunar cycle on effort, suggesting that new socio-ecological pressures have an impact on the time spent fishing during the full moon. This conclusion extends beyond equipment type (motorboat and canoes) and states the importance of studying adaptation processes and responses to change.

    Note: This seminar is part of the 2014 Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar series.


    The Coast Survey and the Civil War

    Date: Wednesday, May 28, 2014 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speaker: Albert Theberge of the NOAA Central Library.

    Abstract: The role of the Coast Survey in the Civil War is little known or understood. The Coast Survey served in virtually all theaters of the Civil War as topographers, hydrographers, scouts, and aides-de-camp. Coast Survey information was used in developing Union strategy for the overall conduct of the war, in developing tactics for certain individual battles, and in helping mold public opinion in the North through the Slavery Map and other cartographic products. Some of the most beautiful and accurate maps of the Civil War were produced by Coast Surveyors - Chattanooga and Vicksburg being prime examples. Blind artillery fire, using geodetic positioning techniques, was first developed by the Coast Survey for the use of David Dixon Porter's mortar boats on the lower Mississippi. March and sail with the Survey through many of the major campaigns of the Civil War - with McClellan on the Peninsula, Grant at Vicksburg and Chattanooga, Farragut and Porter on the Mississippi, and Dupont and Dahlgren during the blockade of Charleston. This is the third seminar of seven detailing the history of the Coast Survey, NOAA's oldest ancestor organization.

    Note: This seminar is part of the NOAA History Roundtable Brown Bag Seminar series.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    The Development of Operational Long-Range Weather Prediction in the U.S.

    Date: Wednesday, June 4, 2014 at 12:00 pm EDT

    Speaker: Bob Reeves

    Abstract: TBD

    Note: This seminar is part of the NOAA History Roundtable Brown Bag Seminar series.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Brown Bag Seminar

    Date: Thursday, June 5, 2014 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speaker: Ambassador Mark P. Lagon, Global Politics and Security Chair at the Master of Science Program in Foreign Service (MSFS) Program at Georgetown University.

    Abstract: Ambassador Lagon will discuss illegal, unreported, and unregulated (IUU) fishing and organized crime.

    Note: This seminar is sponsored by the Law of the Sea Convention Working Group brown bag series.


    The Arctic Open Water Season Conflict Avoidance Agreement and the Management of Development Impacts in the Marine Environment

    Date: Tuesday, June 10, 2014 at 12:00pm EST

    Speaker: is an attorney in private practice specializing in natural resource issues, including the mitigation of local impacts resulting from resource development. She has served as counsel to the Alaska Eskimo Whaling Commission since 1985 and also serves as counsel to the Arctic Marine Mammal Coalition and the Alaska Nanuuq Commission. She recently published A Pioneering Effort in the Design of Process and Law Supporting Integrated Arctic Ocean Management in the Environmental Law Reporter, 43 ELR 10893 (October 2013).

    Abstract: Ocean management experts, along with development experts in other fields, increasingly recognize the need for mechanisms to reduce user conflicts and address trade offs among competing uses of coastal zones, land, and natural resources. The terms "ecosystem-based management" and "marine spatial planning" express the awareness that we are in an age where decision-makers need tools to help them balance development demands against adverse impacts to local ecosystems and economies. These issues are especially prevalent where energy development and commercial activities are expanding in our coastal waters and the oceans beyond. Offshore oil and gas development in arctic Alaska carries a high risk of interference with nutritionally and culturally critical bowhead whale (Balaena mysticetus) subsistence hunting. Since the mid-1980s, the Alaska Eskimo Whaling Commission has engaged offshore oil and gas exploration and development companies, including oil majors, in an annual process of collaboration and negotiation to create mitigation measures capable of avoiding adverse impacts to bowhead whales, habitat, and hunting opportunities. The process, founded on local ecological knowledge and western science, has become a staple of offshore oil and gas development in arctic Alaska. In addition to avoiding adverse impacts to subsistence uses that are protected under federal law, this highly efficient process also reduces conflicts that might otherwise slow offshore permitting. This system of collaboration provides useful insights into how the general concepts of ecosystem-based management and marine spatial planning might be implemented in practice in other settings.

    Note: This seminar is sponsored by the International Section of the NOAA Office of General Counsel.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Dynamics of soundscape in a shallow water marine environment of Indo-Pacific humpback dolphin

    Date: Wednesday, June 11, 2014 at 12:00pm EST

    Speaker: Shane Guan, Office of Protected Resources, NOAA Fisheries

    Abstract: Many aquatic animals use acoustic cues for orientation, communication, predation detection, and predator avoidance. Therefore, underwater acoustic field is an important ecological element for critical life functions of many aquatic animals. This research examines the soundscape of a critically endangered Indo-Pacific humpback dolphin (Sousa chinensis) population in the shallow water environment off the west coast of Taiwan. Underwater acoustic recordings were conducted between late spring and late fall in 2012 at Yunlin (YL), which is close to a shipping lane, and Waisanding (WS), which is relatively pristine. Site specific analyses were performed on the dynamics of the temporal and spectral acoustic characteristics for both locations. The results showed that the soundscape is dominated by acoustic energies in two major octave bands: 150-300 Hz and 1.2-2.4 kHz. The acoustic energy in the former frequency band is mainly associated with large container vessels in the shipping lane near YL, while the latter frequency band is from sonic fish chorus at nighttime. Further analyses indicate that sound from the fish may have more effects on the dolphin's communication, which occurs mostly within the octave band between 3 and 6 kHz. In addition, extremely large variation of low frequency acoustic energy throughout the study period was noticed at WS, where the water depths ranged between 1 and 4 m depending on tidal cycle. Fourier analyses of tidal levels and low frequency sound pressure showed matching periods of these variations, although with different phases. It is hypothesized that this phenomenon was probably caused by the inefficiency propagation of low-frequency acoustic waves in shallow water, which underlines the importance of geophysical feature in shaping the small-scale soundscape characteristics.


    The Arc of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) on Capitol Hill: What Congress' Changing Perceptions of NEPA Over the Years Means for Those Who Implement NEPA

    Date: Thursday, June 12, 2014 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speaker: Horst Greczmiel, Associate Director for National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Oversight, Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ), Executive Office of the President

    Abstract: Mr. Greczmiel will share the story of an environmental statute that was passed with vast bipartisan support in 1969, experienced its glory days, and suffered degradation through congressional exemptions and frustration.

    Note: Note: This is part 2 of the NEPA Brown Bag Series sponsored by NOAA's Office of Program Planning and Integration (PPI)

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    From Sea to Shining Sea - Triumphs and Disasters of the Coast and Geodetic Survey 1867-1917

    Date: Tuesday, June 17, 2014 at 12:00pm EST

    Speaker: Albert Theberge of the NOAA Central Library. He will present a series of seminars on the history of NOAA's oldest ancestor agency, the Coast Survey.

    Abstract:TBD

    Note: This seminar is part of the NOAA History Roundtable Brown Bag Seminar series.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Unmanned Maritime Vehicles: Regulatory Initiatives

    Date: Wednesday, June 18, 2014 at 12:00pm EST

    Speaker: Rand D. LeBouvier, Ph.D., CAPT, USN (ret) is the Strategic Communications Director at Bluefin Robotics Corporation. Dr. LeBouvier served for nearly 30 years in the U.S. Navy, retiring from the service as the Director of the Decision Making and Implementation course at the Naval War College. He was the first Head, Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) Section in the Air Warfare directorate in OPNAV where he was responsible for resources and requirements for the Broad Area Maritime Surveillance UAV, the Unmanned Combat Air Vehicle, the Vertical Take-off and Landing UAV, and the Tactical Control System. Previous assignments include Current Operations officer on the SEVENTHFLT staff homeported in Yokosuka, Japan, commissioning Commanding Officer of USS Carter Hall, assistant Surface Commander and Lieutenant Commander Assignment Officer at BUPERS in Washington, D.C., Executive Officer of USS Germantown, where he participated in Operations Desert Storm/ Desert Shield, and J-5 Navy Planner for United States Southern Command in Panama, where he participated in the planning and execution of Operation Just Cause in December 1989.

    Abstract: The presentation will discuss national and international efforts to classify, certify and regulate unmanned maritime systems including both surface and undersea vehicles. Recent efforts to engage the legal and safety ramifications of these technologies operating within territorial waters and on the high seas are similar to those experienced in the unmanned air vehicle industry operating in controlled airspace. Fortunately, lessons learned from the air domain may prevent a recurrence of the issues encountered with regulatory agencies such as the FAA that have caused inhibitive delays and missed opportunities in the development of unmanned air systems. Industry has a duty to ensure it anticipates and addresses safety, legal and even ethical concerns properly before uninformed popular perception drives response. Early mutual engagement between industry and these agencies can eliminate misunderstanding and can inform unmanned systems manufacturers and operators as to best practices and procedures. Adopting a cooperative stewardship approach to the environment in which they operate and with the agencies that watch over it will stand the unmanned maritime systems industry in good stead. This presentation will review key regulatory and standardization efforts currently underway.

    Note: This seminar is sponsored by the International Section of the NOAA Office of General Counsel.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Effects of stormwater management and stream restoration on watershed nitrogen retention

    Date: Thursday, June 19, 2014 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speaker: Tammy Newcomer Johnson, NOAA National Sea Grant Office and University of Maryland

    Abstract: Restoring urban infrastructure and managing the nitrogen cycle represent emerging challenges for urban water quality. We investigated whether stormwater control measures (SCMs), a form of green infrastructure, integrated into restored and degraded urban stream networks can influence watershed nitrogen loads. We hypothesized that hydrologically connected floodplains and SCMs are "hot spots" for nitrogen removal through denitrification because they have ample organic carbon, low dissolved oxygen levels, and extended hydrologic residence times. We tested this hypothesis by comparing nitrogen retention metrics in two urban stream networks (one restored and one urban degraded) that each contain SCMs, and a forested reference watershed at the Baltimore Long-Term Ecological Research site. We used an urban watershed continuum approach which included sampling over both space and time with a combination of: (1) longitudinal reach-scale mass balances of nitrogen and carbon conducted over 2 years during baseflow and storms (n = 24 sampling dates x 15 stream reaches = 360) and (2) 15N push-pull tracer experiments to measure in situ denitrification in SCMs and floodplain features (n = 72). The SCMs consisted of inline wetlands installed below a storm drain outfall at one urban site (restored Spring Branch) and a wetland/wet pond configured in an oxbow design to receive water during high flow events at another highly urbanized site (Gwynns Run). The SCMs significantly decreased total dissolved nitrogen (TDN) concentrations at both sites and significantly increased dissolved organic carbon at one site. At Spring Branch, TDN retention estimated by mass balance (g/day) was ~150 times higher within the stream network than the SCMs. There were no significant differences between mean in situ denitrification rates between SCMs and hydrologically connected floodplains. Longitudinal N budgets along the stream network showed that hydrologically connected floodplains were important sites for watershed nitrogen retention due to groundwater-surface water interactions. Overall, our results indicate that hydrologic variability can influence nitrogen source/sink dynamics along engineered stream networks. Our analysis also suggests that some major predictors for watershed N retention were: (1) streamwater and groundwater flux through stream restoration or stormwater management controls, (2) hydrologic residence times, and (3) surface area of hydrologically connected features.

    Note: This seminar is part of the 2014 Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar series.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    The Next Generation of Legal Research with Lexis Advance

    Date: Tuesday, June 24, 2014 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speaker: Chris Vestal (LexisNexis Group-HBE), Mary Lou Cumberpatch, NOAA Central Library

    Abstract: In this session you will explore Lexis Advance, the next generation in legal research. You will learn how to:

    • Research all available content, including Web sources-with one search.
    • Enter search words in the red search box no source selection needed!
    • Zero in on results you need with powerful, easy-to-use filters.
    • Save documents, selected text, searches, Web links and much more, to Work Folders you manage.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Exploring Labor and Employment Law

    Date: Tuesday, June 24, 2014 at 3:00pm EDT

    Speaker: Chris Vestal (LexisNexis Group-HBE), Mary Lou Cumberpatch, NOAA Central Library

    Abstract: This session will enable you to:

    • Use advanced search techniques in case law, FLRA, and MSPB decisions
    • Limit your search to specific sections of documents to retrieve more relevant results
    • Quickly search in secondary content dealing with labor and employment law
    • Creating custom groups of databases to search in simultaneously
    • Lexis is Available NOAA-wide from your NOAA Library

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Searching for Accountability: Do Efforts Such as GPRA, GPRAMA, and PART Help?

    Date: Thursday, June 26, 2014 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speaker: Beryl Radin, Georgetown University, McCourt School of Public Policy

    Abstract: For the past several decades, performance measurement requirements have become a crucial part of the effort to improve accountability in the federal government. Requirements have been attached to the budget process that seek to link measures of effectiveness to the funding of those programs. While the urge to improve program effectiveness is commendable, the experience with GPRA and PART has not always led to that goal. This presentation will review the reasons for this problem and draw on the NOAA experience with these efforts

    Presentation Slides (pdf)

    Note: This seminar is sponsored by the NOAA Evaluation Committee.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Invasive Blue and Flathead Catfish in the Chesapeake Bay

    Date: Monday, July 14, 2014 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speaker: Bruce Vogt, Ecosystem Science and Synthesis Manager, NOAA Chesapeake Bay Office

    Abstract: Blue and flathead catfish are considered invasive species in the Chesapeake Bay, as they have rapidly expanded into nearly every major tributary in the Chesapeake Bay watershed. Blue and flathead catfish have the potential to comprise a highly valued recreational fishery as well as negatively affecting native species and the Chesapeake Bay ecosystem. The NOAA Chesapeake Bay Office funds research on invasive catfish to help further understand their basic biology and potential negative effects on native species and human health. Research findings will help inform management and mitigation strategies. A report from the Invasive Catfish Task force is currently being drafted to develop recommendations to slow and reduce the spread of invasive catfish populations, minimize ecological and economic impacts, and improve public awareness.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Reflections On My Time Aboard the JOHN N. COBB

    Date: Tuesday, July 15, 2014 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speaker: John C. Bortniak, CDR, NOAA Corps, Retired

    Abstract: As part of the continuing History Roundtable series, John Bortniak will give a presentation of his experiences in Alaska as Commanding Officer aboard the NOAA ship JOHN N. COBB (and MURRE II) from 1990 to 1993. John will cover a bit of history of the COBB and the person it was named after, the mission of the vessel with operational photos, a tour of several points in Southeast Alaska, and of course, lots of beautiful pictures of Alaskan scenery and wildlife.

    Note: This seminar is part of the NOAA History Roundtable Brown Bag Seminar series.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Social Media and Severe Weather: What Do We Know and Where are We Going?

    Date: Thursday, July 24, 2014 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speaker: Joe Ripberger, CIMMS, National Severe Storms Laboratory

    Abstract: According to a recent report by the Department of Homeland Security, "social media and collaborative technologies have become critical components of emergency preparedness, response, and recovery" (2013). These technologies are critical because they provide a centralized mechanism for two-way communication before, during, and after disasters that allows the National Weather Service, Emergency Managers, the media, and affected communities to disseminate and receive information about a hazard in near real-time. As yet, however, we know relative little about who participates in this exchange of information and how it transpires throughout the course of an event. In this presentation, I will address this void by answering three basic yet important research questions: (1) Who uses social media to get information about severe weather and how has this evolved over time? (2) How does social media usage evolve throughout the course of a severe weather event? (3) What do meteorologists and forecasters think about social media and how has it changed the way they approach their jobs?

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Case-Zablocki Act

    Date: Friday, July 25, 2014 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speaker: Hugh Schratwieser, NOAA Office of General Counsel

    Presentation Slides (pdf format)

    Abstract: This brown bag presentation will address the law and policies regarding international agreements and memoranda of understanding between NOAA and counterparts in foreign nations. Hugh Schratwieser of the NOAA Office of General Counsel Weather, Satellites and Research Section will provide an overview of the Case-Zablocki Act and its implementation by the Department of Commerce and NOAA's Office of General Counsel. Authority for making most determinations under the Case-Zablocki Act for NOAA international agreements is delegated to the NOAA General Counsel by the Department of Commerce General Counsel. Additional information on the Case-Zablocki Act and its implementation by the Department of Commerce and NOAA is available online at http://www.gc.noaa.gov/gc_case_zablocki.html. NOAA GC guidance on legal determinations under the Case-Zablocki Act is available online at http://www.gc.noaa.gov/documents/082604-faq-case-act-2p.pdf.

    Note: This seminar is sponsored by the International Section of the NOAA Office of General Counsel.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Title>Hurricane Sandy and SWATH Network

    Date: Thursday, July 31, 2014 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speaker: Robert Mason and Harry Jenter, USGS, John Fulton, NOAA

    Robert Mason Presentation slides (pdf)

    John Fulton Presentation slides (pdf)

    Harry Jenter Presentation slides (pdf)

    Abstract: Understanding the evolution and dissipation of overland storm tides and waves as they move across natural and manmade landscapes is critical to increasing coastal resilience and establishing early warning systems for coastal storm hazards. In the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy, the USGS is building an overland Surge, Wave, and Tide Hydrodynamics (SWaTH) network along the Atlantic Coast from Virginia through Maine to provide more timely storm-surge and wave data to enhance public awareness, help forecasters predict surge impacts, and inform emergency responders. During this brown-bag presentation the presenters will describe plans for implementation of the SWaTH and discuss collaborative opportunities and user needs and solicit input from NOAA scientists and engineers.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Developing Holistic Marine Data Management Solutions

    Date: Wednesday, August 13, 2014 at 12:00pm EDT

    Presentation slides (pdf)

    Speaker: Rob Bochenek, Information Architect and CEO, Axiom Data Science -- Rob Bochenek is an information Architect at Axiom Data Science an Anchorage based data science and cyberinfrastructure technology firm. Rob has over 15 years experience developing data management systems for a wide array of ecological and geophysical data types and user groups. He is also the technical lead for the Central and Northern California Observing System (CeNCOOS) and the Alaska Ocean Observing System (AOOS) which are both regional associations for the Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS).

    Abstract: Data management of marine and coastal research data is particularly challenging because it can include a vast range of subjects and variables. Data relevant to marine scientists may include field, expedition or cruise observations, laboratory analyses, data from remote sensing satellite and observational platforms, model outputs, and various other sources. From a systems-level perspective, model and satellite data are often in standardized data formats and are easier to manage in an automated fashion than project level data (e.g., ad hoc spreadsheets and databases). However, these project data may be complex in nature, large in size (megabytes to terabytes) and packaged in advanced formats. Project data typically require individualized review, and even experts within subfields may have difficulty using data from different sources because of the plethora of data collection protocols. This talk will explore these issues more deeply, discuss strategies and demonstrate several technologies which have been developed to address these problems in a holistic way. The Research Workspace, being actively used by several NOAA research campaigns, will be presented as a solution for researchers to centralize, secure, share, document and publish projects, data and metadata. Additionally, several examples of cyberinfrastructure, developed with funding from NOAA and others, will be demonstrated which enable data resources (GIS, numerical models/remote sensed, sensor networks, time series and research project assets) to be discovered, integrated and visualized. Examples of these types of systems can be accessed online at http://portal.aoos.org/ and http://data.cencoos.org/.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Innovative ways to visualize and analyze environmental time-series data

    Date: Wednesday, August 20, 2014 at 12:00pm EDT

    Speaker: Dr. Richard Koehler, instructional hydrologist with the NWS Training Division and is located in Boulder, Colorado, and a retired lieutenant commander (NOAA Corps) with years of hydrographic, geodetic, and oceanographic data collection experience while aboard NOAA ships. Dr. Richard Koehler is a certified professional hydrologist with 30 years of environmental and water resources expertise. He is a retired lieutenant commander (NOAA Corps) with years of hydrographic, geodetic, and oceanographic data collection experience while aboard NOAA ships. Never satisfied with traditional time plots, he developed an intuitive way to view time-series which became the basis of his dissertation from the University of Arizona. The US Geological Survey has incorporated his techniques into the USGS Water Water website as a visualization tool. He is currently an instructional hydrologist with the NWS Training Division and is located in Boulder, CO.

    Presentation slides (pdf)

    Abstract: An environmental time-series dataset plotted as a "time map" and analyzed in a GIS-like manner offers environmental scientists and professionals an alternative approach to examining multiple types of time-series data. This technique can integrate data from numerous sources such as observations, model output, or other time-based data. Case studies and applications of multi-scale pattern identification and data QA/QC are presented to demonstrate the power of this technique. Important differences between time maps and spatial maps are shown. Specific visualization examples include streamflow, salmon migration, water temperature, drought indices, climate change scenarios, meteorological measurements and SNOTEL snowpack metrics.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Title: Rebels with a cause: engineering diatoms into fuel factories

    Date: Thursday, August 21, 2014 at 12:00-12:30 pm EDT

    Speaker: Emily Trentacoste, NOAA Fisheries Office of Aquaculture, California Sea Grant Knauss Fellow, emily.trentacoste@noaa.gov

    Presentation slides (pdf)

    Abstract: Diatoms are rebels of the microalgae world. They have unique evolutionary histories, bafflingly diverse metabolisms and bizarrely intricate morphologies. Many of the characteristics that make diatoms such oddballs among microalgae also make them excellent candidates as sources for biofuels. Engineering microalgae to produce lipids for fuel is not a new concept; however, all engineering attempts thus far have resulted in organisms with decreased fitness, which thwarts the advantages of using microalgae to produce fuel in the first place. We characterized, identified and targeted a previously ignored pathway - that of lipid catabolism, or the breakdown of lipids - for engineering. By knocking down the function of a specific lipase using targeted antisense RNA techniques, we produced strains that accumulated four times as many fuel-relevant lipids as wild-type strains, but showed no decrease in growth or division. This work showed that contrary to popular thought, growth and lipid accumulation are not mutually exclusive in microalgae.

    Note: This seminar is part of the 2014 Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar series.

    Remote access via webinar will be available. See the General Information section above for details.


    Title: International relations: Exploring global diversity, dispersal, and environmental selection in a marine diatom species

    Date: Thursday, August 21, 2014 at 12:30-1:00 pm EDT

    Speaker: Kerry Whittaker, NMFS Office of Protected Resources, Sea Grant Knauss Fellow, Rhode Island, Kerry.Whittaker@noaa.gov

    Abstract: Diatoms exhibit astounding levels of inter and intraspecific diversity, yet the mechanisms driving their diversification are little understood. I determined global population structure among > 450 isolates of the cosmopolitan, ecologically important diatom species Thalassiosira rotula. A "global snapshot" approach was used to sample isolates throughout a single year (2010) at sites distributed across the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Ocean basins and hemispheres. Isolates were genotyped using six microsatellite markers developed from 454 sequencing of this species. Clonal diversity within sites was as high as 100%, and divergence between sites reached FST values upwards of 0.2. The presence of genetically distinct populations demonstrates that significant divergence can occur despite the high potential for dispersal in these planktonic organisms. Principle coordinates analysis (PCA) and isolation-by-distance measures demonstrated that genetic distance was unrelated to geographic distance, suggesting that distance does not limit connectivity among diatom populations. Instead, genetic connectivity over global geographic space and time was significantly correlated with abiotic (temperature) and ecological (chlorophyll a) factors of the marine environment. These data suggest that geographic distance is not a barrier to genetic connectivity among diatom populations; instead, vast genetic diversity and high genetic structure is maintained and supported by ecological selection occurring over space and time.

    Note: This seminar is part of the 2014 Knauss Fellows Brown Bag Seminar series.


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